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| | |-+  TVM Southern "poor boy" rifle kit.
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Author Topic: TVM Southern "poor boy" rifle kit.  (Read 3568 times)
FRJ
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Posts: 370



« on: April 27, 2011, 08:06:06 PM »

I really like "Poor Boys" and this one from TVM seem to be a quality kit. Question is how hard a kit is this to build? Would it be a good choice for a first time kit builder with limited tools? I'm thinking of 58cal R/H flintlock. Any comments would be greatly appreciated even if its just to tell me I'm nuts. Frank
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Better to die on my feet than to live on my knees!!
Long Ears
Sr. Member
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Posts: 395



« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2011, 08:35:30 PM »

I started with one of their kits. It was the Lancaster. Matt and Toni are great people to deal with and if you run into a question just call them and they will talk you through it. You really need to get the books suggested here on the forum, they really help. I got Peter Alexanders book that is out of print now I believe. The one Chuck Dixon wrote is almost as good. I had never built any type of kit before the Lancaster and the books really helped. I had to read it about 4 times to learn Canadian but it finally made good since. Good Luck, Bob
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Tommy Bruce
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Posts: 311


« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2011, 07:29:08 AM »

Frank,
I think they do a lot of the work for you, everything is inlet and I believe even the lock bolt is drilled.  Call Matt & Toni and ask them any questions you have.  They are pretty good folks to deal with.  They usually go to the Ft. Fredrick Market fair this weekend, so I'd try next week.
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T*O*F
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WWW
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2011, 09:08:59 AM »

Once again, people leap to conclusions without enough information.  There are two TVM's and he hasn't specified which one he is talking about.
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A dedicated person with just a pocketknife can accomplish more than a lazy person with an entire toolbox.
FRJ
Sr. Member
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Posts: 370



« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2011, 10:25:37 AM »

I'm sorry for the misunderstanding about the TVM initials. I too dislike the use of initials in place of words. In fact I find it offensive. Anyhow the company I'm talking about is Tennessee Valley Muzzleloaders and the kit I'm looking at is the southern rifle poor boy. Just to quench my curriousity, what is the other TVM? Again please forgive my ignorance, I'm really new to this facinating segment of firearm history and have a LOT to learn. Frank
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Better to die on my feet than to live on my knees!!
Jim B ( no, another one)
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Posts: 189


« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2011, 10:33:28 AM »

Tennessee Valley Manufacturing.  More geared towards muzzleloading parts.  No matter which I'm lookng for, I still always go to the wrong TVM first. 
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You know, I just don't know.  The more I know, the more I know I just don't know.  You know?

"When the 'sh-tuff' really hits the fan, will my i-phone tell me where to go?" my 18 y-o niece, after watching one of those 'Doomsday Preppers' shows.  I think (hope) she was kidding!
bob in the woods
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« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2011, 12:52:42 PM »

TVM, [ Muzzleloaders] was owned by Jack Garner, and he sold it to Matt and Toni.  I did a lot of business with Jack over the years. He later was involved with the other TVM until his recent retirement.
They sell components, but also sell a lot of kits. Usually pretty basic.
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runastav
Sr. Member
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Posts: 331



« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2011, 03:15:37 PM »

Hi
I bay my Poor-Boy Tennessee Rifle cal 50 whit 42" barrel from Tennesse Valley Muzzleloading in 2003, and I am very satefide.
Runar
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FRJ
Sr. Member
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Posts: 370



« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2011, 04:55:52 PM »

Runar, thats one good looking rifle. I like simple and functional and while all the engraving and carving etc surely have their place I prefer a working rifle as I'm a hunter and not a collector. Your rifle is exactly what I want. Frank
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Better to die on my feet than to live on my knees!!
Tommy Bruce
Sr. Member
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Posts: 311


« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2011, 11:02:16 PM »

Once again, people leap to conclusions without enough information.  There are two TVM's and he hasn't specified which one he is talking about.

Ben a while since Jack has advertised anything though.  Are they even in business anymore??
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Kermit
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Posts: 1950


« Reply #10 on: April 29, 2011, 08:33:20 PM »

Jack's outfit, Tennessee Valley Manufacturing:
http://tennesseevalleymanufacturing.com/

Matt's outfit, Tennessee Valley Muzzleloading:
http://www.avsia.com/tvm/

 Tongue Roll Eyes Tongue
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shortbarrel
Jr. Member
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Posts: 76


« Reply #11 on: May 04, 2011, 05:31:49 PM »

Why don"t we get rid of this poor boy thing, call them what they were "working rifles". Most of the folks back then were poor and they didn't even own a  rifle.
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Jim Kibler
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Posts: 2167


« Reply #12 on: May 04, 2011, 06:48:02 PM »

Why don"t we get rid of this poor boy thing, call them what they were "working rifles". Most of the folks back then were poor and they didn't even own a  rifle.

Then the assumption might be made that decorated rifles weren't "working rifles" or commonly used.   By the condition in which many remain, this does not appear to be true.  What a plain rifle is is just that and nothing more.  Romanticism causes people to associate other titles.
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Ron Brimer
Guest
« Reply #13 on: May 04, 2011, 11:29:33 PM »

Jim  That has always been one of my peeves, people assume the decorated guns are not " Working Guns " They don't research the time period of the Southern Iron mounted gun. The " Poor Boy" is 1820s into the 1930s In the Southern Mountains . If you go to Southern States ,you will find lots of photos taken in the 1920 to 30s . You would think people would research. They for the most part Blacksmith Guns .  
RON B. Director of Exhibits Ga Dept of  Natl Resources. Museums and Historic Sites .  Retired, and gun builder for 35 years.
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Glenn
Sr. Member
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Posts: 463


« Reply #14 on: May 04, 2011, 11:36:08 PM »

I like to refer to the "working rifles" as "hunters".  I prefer something more subdued as opposed to flashy/shiny when I'm hunting.  This of course is just my personal preference and way of doing things.
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Many of them cried; "Me no Alamo - Me no Goliad", and for most of them these were the last words they spoke.
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