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| | | |-+  Ferric Nitrate Staining photos
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Author Topic: Ferric Nitrate Staining photos  (Read 6239 times)
Ephram
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« on: July 15, 2011, 09:14:52 PM »

Here are step by step photos of the staining process with Ferric Nitrate. I don't really understand why some people insist on making their own with nitric acid (aqua fortis) and iron. Purchasing Ferric nitrate is much safer, and cheaper. I've used Ferric Nitrate on various woods many times (Furniture), though this is the first time I use it on a gunstock. I mixed 30 grams with about 2 cups of water. The ferric nitrate is slightly purple salt that turns a clear yellow when dissolved in water

This is the stock before staining



This is the stock after the ferric nitrate has been generously applied, and allowed to dry. A single application is sufficient.  Notice how the wood takes on a greenish grey color.



This is the stock after it has been heated with a heat gun.



This is the stock after the first application of boiled linseed oil.



I use some coarse steel wool to highlight some of the carving.


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Nate McKenzie
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« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2011, 11:02:05 PM »

Do you neutralize it and with what?
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Richard Westerfield
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« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2011, 11:26:46 PM »

thank you
 for posting this tutorial the pepole on this forum are the greatest i have learned a lot
 thank you
Richard Westerfield
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Ephram
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« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2011, 02:15:55 PM »

I do not neutralize it. Ferric nitrate is a bit corrosive. Allow a few days for the wood to dry out completely, and apply several coats of linseed oil before you mount the barrel and any other steel hardware, or you might get a bit of surface rust.  I have not noticed any significant darkening of the wood over time.
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Glenn
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« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2011, 12:38:50 AM »

This method has produced a beautiful brown that I really do like.  I'm more interested in trying this as opposed to using nitric acid.  Where can I get this same chemical?  I have no idea who sells stuff like this.

How long do you leave the heat gun on any given part of the stock, do you pass all over quickly keeping it moving, or what?

Thanks for sharing these photos and the process with us.   Grin
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brokenflint
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« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2011, 07:45:28 AM »

Glenn   Radio Shack or any electronics supply house in your area is usually the best place to look.
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Brokenflint
Glenn
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« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2011, 09:59:31 AM »

Glenn   Radio Shack or any electronics supply house in your area is usually the best place to look.

OK ... thanks.   Grin   I'll drop by one here in the area in a couple of days.
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G. Elsenbeck
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« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2011, 12:31:00 PM »

Ephram, excellent method and if you forgive me for a couple of questions: I assume you show this on maple.  Correct?  Also, have you used this on other wood species and got similar results?  Specifically cherry, ash or walnut? 
Thanks for sharing with us. 
Gary
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Karl Kunkel
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« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2011, 09:53:59 PM »

Glenn,
 
 http://www.sciencecompany.com/

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Kunk
Glenn
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« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2011, 10:56:04 PM »


Thanks for the link Karl.  I checked it out and I'll order a bottle.  Now I just have figure out how to measure or determine "grains" or grams from a teaspoon.   Grin
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longcruise
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« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2011, 11:34:37 PM »

I've found it to be very easy to work with and the results are very pleasing. 

Have followed any number of various instructions to make my own aqua fortis, and for the most part it's just a noxious mess! 

I neutralize it thourougly, just in case!
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Mike Lee

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Glenn
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« Reply #11 on: July 18, 2011, 12:16:21 AM »

I went in to the website that Karl provided and the company must be longrifle enthusiasts themselves because they give all the formulas and compounds that are popular to produce different types of "browns" on metal.  One of the formulas uses the same Ferric Nitrate to produce and brown on steel.  Seems like the same stuff can be used on the stock and barrel both.  I might try that.  1 bottle is only about $10.00 plus UPS shipping.  I'll order some tomorrow.

Thanks again for all the information.  Now I also got a reason to make tracks to Sears and buy a nice heat gun.   Grin
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Many of them cried; "Me no Alamo - Me no Goliad", and for most of them these were the last words they spoke.
Ephram
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« Reply #12 on: July 20, 2011, 08:27:26 PM »

Ephram, excellent method and if you forgive me for a couple of questions: I assume you show this on maple.  Correct?  Also, have you used this on other wood species and got similar results?  Specifically cherry, ash or walnut? 
Thanks for sharing with us. 
Gary

The stock on these photos is Maple.  I only use this method on light woods like maple, ash, pine and basswood, hickory, etc...  I find that darker woods like walnut, mahogany or cherry come out almost black.  You should definitely do a test on a scrap of wood.
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Dr. Tim-Boone
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« Reply #13 on: July 21, 2011, 11:35:40 AM »

You can mix it with denatured alcohol instead of distilled water and it will not raise as much grain.... colors seem to be just the same..... beware of tap water chemical contamination.

I agree this stuff is the only way to go for this type of stain... you can modify the color wit dangler stains as well...  have fun
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kutter
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« Reply #14 on: July 24, 2011, 07:04:55 PM »

Becareful if you have silver furniture or inlays on the rifle in place when you stain with ferric nitrate,,as it will etch silver and any alloys containing silver.
Jewelers & engravers used to use 'iron nitrate' as a silver etchant quite often. Mostly in decorative matted backgroundwork.

It's slightly acidic on the Ph scale IIRC,,about like ferric chloride.

It will also put a decent dark patina on some brass alloys,,but not all of them for some reason unknown to me.
Some experimentation needed there if that's what you're after.

Sure makes a nice looking stain for maple!
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