Author Topic: Scratch Stock Planes  (Read 9197 times)

Offline Bill-52

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Scratch Stock Planes
« on: August 22, 2011, 01:05:36 AM »
In Acer's recent post on the stabbing technique for relief carving, scratch stocks were mentioned as often being used for forearm molding.  I've viewed the Fine Woodworking videos on scratch stocks that come up when using the search function and have a fairly good idea of the cutting plane.  But what shape block is used for a scratch stock specifically for forearm molding?

Shumway's Recreating the American Longrifle illustrates a device that rides in the ramrod channel.  But I was wondering about a block that rides along the forearm?  Anybody use such a tool?  Any pictures?

Bill

Offline BillPac

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Re: Scratch Stock Planes
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2011, 05:08:57 PM »
The tool you are talking about is pictured in JHAT Book 1 I believe.
BillP

Offline Bill-52

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Re: Scratch Stock Planes
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2011, 02:44:30 AM »
Thanks, Bill.  I found a reference in Alexander's Gunsmith of Grenville County: "Making and Using a Scratch Stock for Forearm Mouldings" in JHAT, Vol 3, June 1987.  Now I just have to find that.  NMLRA has only Vol 4, Amazon and eBay want an arm and a leg, the library consortium doesn't have it....

Offline Ky-Flinter

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Re: Scratch Stock Planes
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2011, 05:19:01 AM »
Here's my scratch-stock.  I posted this back in 2009.







And here's how I finished off the front end of the moulding...





-Ron
Life is too short to hunt with an ugly gun.
-Nate McKenzie

Offline Bill-52

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Re: Scratch Stock Planes
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2011, 10:47:10 PM »
Thanks, Ron.  The pictures are very helpful.  After reviewing scratch stocks designed for beading on cabinets, I was having a hard time visualizing modifying the block for forearm molding.

Bill

Offline Kevin Houlihan

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Re: Scratch Stock Planes
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2011, 02:33:52 AM »
Maybe I'm missing something, but... when using a scratch stock on a stock with a swamped barrel, as you scratch the flute in the waist area doesn't the scratch stock make the ramrod groove wall real thin?
Kevin

Offline alyce-james

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Re: Scratch Stock Planes
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2011, 02:48:48 AM »
Thanks Ron; This posting will help me alot and I'm sure it will helps other builders, also make this task of rifle building somewhat easier. AJ 
Turkeyfooter

Offline Kermit

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Re: Scratch Stock Planes
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2011, 05:35:22 AM »
I've come 'round to making my scratch stocks with two pieces of 1/2" maple sandwiched and attached with flat head machine screws and square nuts opposite, with both the heads and nuts countersunk. I used wing nuts early on, but found I was clumsy enough to make unwanted divots with those dang wings. Unless your saw kerf and the thickness of your steel cutter are pretty well matched, the cutter can slip and make mismatched cuts. I just recently made one as a trial with both legs of the "L" the same length so the cutter can be perpendicular to either leg. One leg stays squared and the other gets chamfered down to about 1/32" on either side of the cutter. I oriented the grain direction of the two pieces of maple at 90 degrees to one another in what may have been an unnecessary attempt to keep one leg from being more susceptible to splitting off. It seems to allow me more options for uses. So far it seems to work fine, but may be over engineered for versatility when the dang things are so quick and dirty to make that single use stocks are quite practical.
"Anything worth doing is worth doing slowly." Mae West

LehighBrad

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Re: Scratch Stock Planes
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2011, 07:57:26 PM »
I gotta say Thank You also...especially for posting the picture of how your scratch stock rides along the forestock in relation to how the stock itself is oriented. I was having a terrible time trying to picture that in my mind.  :)