American Long Rifles Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
April 21, 2014, 08:34:37 AM
Home Help Login Register
News:

View the Most Recent Posts
View the ALR Mission Statement
View ALR Rules and Policies
Donate to ALR via US Mail or PayPal

+  AmericanLongRifles Forums
|-+  General discussion
| |-+  Contemporary Longrifle Collecting
| | |-+  Hawken Rifle by T. K. Dawson
« previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Hawken Rifle by T. K. Dawson  (Read 6474 times)
hawknknife
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 279



WWW
« on: May 22, 2012, 06:33:33 PM »

Gentlemen,
with the postings as of late on the subject of Hawken rifles, the name TK Dawson has been frequently mentioned. I want to post these pictures of a big rifle that Tom built in 1968. It is a .54 cal 36 inch tapered barrel.  It is engraved on the bottom flat of the barrel in the forearm "Thomas K. Dawson, Jan. 31, 1968 #75 Barrel by Bill Large"  The rifle weighs just under 12 lbs.

Dawson's name is stamped inside the lockplate and some of you may know better than me but I think he made the lock and triggers.  There is an old simulated brass strip repair on the wrist similar to the original Hoffman & Campbell Hawken that Dawson owned.

This rifle is pictured four times in John D. Baird's book, "Fifteen Years in the Hawken Lode."  I have owned this rifle for a number of years and have yet to burn any powder in it.

Thanks for lookin'
Carl
www.hawknknife.com
hawknknife@hotmail.com


























Logged

rich pierce
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*
Posts: 7156



« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2012, 06:51:24 PM »

That's a dandy, looks real, has lots of character, and appears to be a near bench copy.  I'd rather not see the name engraved on the barrel but I understand the intent at the time was not to fool anyone but rather build one like Sam did.
Logged

St. Louis, Missouri
Bob Roller
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1638


« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2012, 11:33:40 PM »

I am glad to see an example of Tom Dawson's work here for all to see. We were friends for many years and how well do I remember the night in March of 1989 that his son in law called me and told me that Tom had a fatal heart attack that morning. Getting to the rifle. Tom did make that lock and showed it to me before he built the gun.Notice the intense and dedicated inletting of that lock,no shingle hatchets or termites there. The triggers are mine and so is the rear sight. Tom had a big influence on a lot of us and his contempt for junk was a fierce as his dedication to quality work. I think those triggers are shown in Baird's first book on Hawken rifles along with a Bill Large barrel.These were special triggers and I think I made perhaps 4 sets of them. Tom's brother in law may still have a set made in 1966 or thereabout.
You have a valueable rifle and certainly one to be proud of.
Could you send those pictures to me at<wvgzr@webtv,net>?? I would like to put them in a dedicated folder.

Bob Roller
Logged
Bob Roller
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1638


« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2012, 11:51:05 PM »

At one time,Tom Dawson had the original barrel stamp that marked "S.Hawken St Louis" on the barrels.

Bob Roller
Logged
Jim B ( no, another one)
Full Member
***
Posts: 189


« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2012, 10:32:09 AM »

Thanks for posting such detailed pics of this rifle.  Its great to see some work from the earlier days of the ML resurgence.   Its easy to see how Mr. Dawsons work would have influenced anyone who paid attention.  Mr. Roller, your description of 'intense and dedicated inletting' is very accurate.  Great work!

I do have a couple of questions about a couple of details of this gun that someone may be able to answer.

1.  The nipple appears to be recessed into the hammer further than most percussion guns I've seen, and I don't think the nipple is shortened(if anything, it appears longer).  Was this something found on the original this was based on?  Looks like it would really contain any cap shrapnel (crapnel?).

2.  The ramrod has 3 grooves that look like they could be for indicating 'loaded', or perhaps different loads?  Also, there appears to be a small hole near the end of the ramrod.  Would this have been for purchase, or grip, while maybe using a ball puller, or...?

Thanks
Jimb
Logged

You know, I just don't know.  The more I know, the more I know I just don't know.  You know?

"When the 'sh-tuff' really hits the fan, will my i-phone tell me where to go?" my 18 y-o niece, after watching one of those 'Doomsday Preppers' shows.  I think (hope) she was kidding!
hawknknife
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 279



WWW
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2012, 11:57:18 AM »

Jim, Yes, there is a deep recess on the face of the hammer, it allows the hammer to go down to the shoulder of the nipple.  Maybe Mr. Roller can answer the question as I don't know if Mr. Dawson made the hammer as well as the lock.
   
Logged

Ray Nelson
Starting Member
*
Posts: 43


« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2012, 12:58:57 PM »

Thanks for posting the pictures of such a prized rifle. T. K.'s craftmanship and guns by others like him very much influenced me during the 70's. I've pretty much worn out John Baird's Hawken Rifle books and article's over the past 40 some years which showed and explained the details of original hawken rifles.
 
Like Mr. Roller, I appreciate the memories seeing a gun like yours bring back.

By the way Mr. Roller's locks and triggers are second to none. I had the chance years ago to examine his quality efforts and they are indeed proudly mentioned by these gun owners as the very best components to be had in their firearms.

Sincerely,

Ray


Logged
Bob Roller
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1638


« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2012, 01:10:45 PM »

Yes,Tom Dawson did make that lock and I made the triggers and the rear sight. I still have that sight sketch Tom sent me to work by.
The deep hammer cup has a reason for being. It enshrouds the nipple and in case of a burst cap.the rubbish will follow the path of least resistance and exit out the slot in the front of the hammer. This feature was not uncommon on high end American target rifles like the N.Whitmore made for General Grant after the Civil War.
I hope this answers your question.

Bob Roller
Logged
Jim B ( no, another one)
Full Member
***
Posts: 189


« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2012, 05:48:14 PM »

Thank you Mr. Roller.  I knew the reason for the recess, it's just the first time I've seen, or noticed, one so deep as to allow the hammer to rest on the shoulder of the nipple.  Another interesting detail.  Thanks again. 
Logged

You know, I just don't know.  The more I know, the more I know I just don't know.  You know?

"When the 'sh-tuff' really hits the fan, will my i-phone tell me where to go?" my 18 y-o niece, after watching one of those 'Doomsday Preppers' shows.  I think (hope) she was kidding!
Bill Ridout
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 79


« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2012, 09:20:24 PM »

Dang, Carl. You have a prize there for sure. Thanks for sharing with us.
Bill
Logged

If the noise does not improve upon the silence, then let the silence prevail.
Thomas Jefferson
Hungry Horse
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1045


« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2012, 12:04:04 PM »

Bob;

  I have been asked by the widow of an old friend to help her evaluate the parts her late husband had saved up for a Hawken project. The long bar triggers are yours. What is the current value of these beautiful triggers.

                        Hungry Horse
Logged
Bob Roller
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1638


« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2012, 01:16:56 PM »

If the triggers are like the ones shown on the
Dawson rifle or in Baird's first book,about $125 in today's weak currency.If they are the regualar style,about $60-65.

Bob Roller
Logged
Hungry Horse
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1045


« Reply #12 on: May 24, 2012, 05:37:04 PM »

I think they are the standard triggers. I don't have them here to examine. But, I don't recall them having a straight front trigger, or a curl. Thanks Bob. It is a pleasure to handle parts that don't make one think "is there some way to make this junk work" I applaud your craftsmanship.

                            Hungry Horse
Logged
TKsdaughter
Starting Member
*
Posts: 2


« Reply #13 on: January 03, 2013, 06:56:10 PM »

My father made this gun and I remember it very well. I also remember the original that he copied it from. I saw a post by Bob Roller whom I remember as well . I'd like to catch up with him. My son had followed in his Grandfathers footsteps and is also an accomplished gun maker. He  makes long rifles entirely all handmade from welding and forging the barrels to making the triggers and locks.
Logged
Clowdis
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 87


« Reply #14 on: January 03, 2013, 08:54:46 PM »

In the 6th and 7th photos down it looks like the wrist really was broken at some time and the repairs aren't just for looks. Still, overall a great rifle. I envy the owner!
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!