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| |-+  Gun Building
| | |-+  Making a gunlock
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Author Topic: Making a gunlock  (Read 4988 times)
pushboater
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« Reply #30 on: June 13, 2013, 02:12:14 PM »

What a great tutorial!  Looking forward to the next installment.  Thanks for sharing Jim.

Capt. David
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Those who would give up essential liberty, to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.  (Benjamin Franklin)        Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch.  Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote!  (Benjamin Franklin)
James Wilson Everett
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« Reply #31 on: September 03, 2013, 07:50:46 PM »

Guys,

Now that I am back in the USA, it is time to resume making this gunlock.  At the Fair at New Boston I spent some time shaping the rough pan to the rounded shape I want for the lock.  Here is how it looks after the rough shaping.



You wait until after the frizzen is installed to do the final shaping and to make sure that the pan/frizzen fit is good and tight.

Now for the job of installing the frizzen.  For this lock I am using a ready made firzzen, maybe later I will show the process of forging a frizzen, but I felt lazy.  It is difficult to clamp the frizzen and pan together to drill the frizzen screw hole correctly, especially with the rounded surfaces as with this lock design.



I use super glue and just glue the frizzen in its proper place on the pan.  Yes, I know that this is not historically correct!



With the firzzen glued in place on the pan, check to be sure everything is aligned properly, then drill the frizzen cam hole using the existing lockplate hole as a guide.  I am sure that you understand that these two holes will be in perfect alignment.  This hole is the size for the screw thread tap.



Finally, you ream the frizzen cam hole to the body diameter of the frizzen screw and leave the lockplate hole the size to be later tapped for the frizzen screw thread.  A gentile rap with a hammer will break the super glue joint apart.  This technique will give a really good and tight fit of the frizzen to the pan.



Jim
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Long John
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« Reply #32 on: September 05, 2013, 10:10:56 AM »

Jim,

I am anxiously waiting for the next installment.  When this thread is done I am going to print it out and put it in a safe place for future reference.  I would love to do what you are doing!

Many Thanks and Best Regards,

John Cholin
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Acer Saccharum
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WWW
« Reply #33 on: September 05, 2013, 10:28:34 AM »

Shall we make a tutorial out of this?

By the way, once a thread is posted to the tutorial section, it can no longer be added to. It can be modified, or edited by a mod, or the original poster.
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Tom Curran's web site : http://tcurran.com/
Rolf
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« Reply #34 on: September 05, 2013, 11:06:39 AM »

Yes, please make it a tutorial. But wait until the lock is finished so all the info is collected in one thread so we don't lose anything.

Best regards
Rolf
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James Wilson Everett
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« Reply #35 on: September 28, 2013, 08:29:03 AM »

Guys,

I was able to do a little more work on the gunlock.  I do the really hand made work as a show-n-tell for the visitors at the Fair at New Boston and the Somerset Mountain Craft Days.  Here is the next installment.  After the frizzen is installed the next step is to file the pan outline to match the frizzen.  I leave the pan a bit oversize until after the frizzen is installed so I can get a good alignment.  Not a whole lot of difference from the last photos as the metal removed from the pan is about 1/16 inch.



Next I install the partially completed frizzen spring, check out the entire process in the tutorial section.  Notice that the cam nose on the frizzen is much too long, it will be trimmed back later.



Also, the pan bolster holding screw has been installed.  The bolster has been trimmed back just until there is clearance for the tumbler bridal screw to pass.  Later it will be final shaped to give clearance for the tumbler bridal and for the mainspring when at full cock.  Remember, you can always cut things smaller, but making them bigger is a chore.



Jim
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KLMoors
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« Reply #36 on: September 28, 2013, 10:36:14 AM »

Very cool. That has very graceful lines.
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Bob Roller
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« Reply #37 on: September 28, 2013, 03:21:27 PM »

Good looking lock.With no pan bridle,how many times can the lock be
fired before the pivot screw gives a bit and upsets the fit to the pan.
I made a couple of small ones about 50 years ago but have no strong
memories beyond the fact I did make them.

Bob Roller
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James Wilson Everett
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« Reply #38 on: September 28, 2013, 03:56:46 PM »

Good comment, Bob, and it is a bit of a concern when making the pan without the bridal/support arm.  What I do is make the frizzen pivot screw from steel instead of wrought iron.  This pivot screw is made from W1 drill rod and hardened and tempered like a spring.  On this one I heated the screw to bright cherry, brine quenched and tempered to just beyond blue, probably about 700F or so.  You can see the heat treat color on the frizzen pivot screw and not on the frizzen spring screw.  This seems to give good results and I have seen no loosening of the fit over time.

Thanks for the comment.

Jim
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Acer Saccharum
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« Reply #39 on: September 28, 2013, 04:29:35 PM »

I suspect that 250 yrs ago, on locks without frizzen bridles, the screw hole wore quickly when made of inferior fit/finish/materials. The bridled frizzen could be made with little more effort, and a lot less precision on the fitting and materials.
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Tom Curran's web site : http://tcurran.com/
Mark Elliott
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« Reply #40 on: September 29, 2013, 04:50:10 PM »

Tom,

Having worked on English trade locks of various types,  I can tell you that there was not much consideration given to how well they were made or would last.   These things were obviously slapped together for a market that either didn't matter or didn't care.    I really wouldn't give our 18th century English bretheran too much credit.    There was the good stuff they made for the elite among themselves, and the junk they made for the unwashed masses and to send to us.    Wink
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