Author Topic: re: Andre J. Roubo: Translation of “L’Art Du Menuisier”  (Read 7994 times)

Offline chrisdefrance

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re: Andre J. Roubo: Translation of “L’Art Du Menuisier”
« on: September 17, 2014, 07:42:18 PM »
The Art of Roubo’s Woodwork Bench
Andre J. Roubo: Translation of “L’Art Du Menuisier” Forgive if this is duplication.

Lost Art Press



http://blog.lostartpress.com/2008/06/07/andre-j-roubo-translation-of-“l’art-du-menuisier”/

Ingenious Design of the 18th Century Roubo Workbench Sees Modern-Day Reincarnation
Posted by hipstomp / Rain Noe  |  20 Aug 2012  |  

Build A Fine Looking WoodWork Bench

http://www.core77.com/blog/tools/ingenious_design_of_the_18th_century_roubo_workbench_sees_modern-day_reincarnation_23222.asp

Chris Schwarz Article that contains a beautiful copy of Andre J. Roubo’s Plate 11.

http://www.popularwoodworking.com/workbenches/schwarz-workbenches/free-wallpaper-of-roubos-plate-11

One of the images is of the workroom. The other is of some of the bench details shown at the bottom of the plate.

Find these beautiful pieces in the site above.
Benchfeatures_1920x1200.jpg (298.36 KB)
Workshop_1920x1200.jpg (807.68 KB)

Inside Roubo’s ‘The Book of Plates‘
by Chris Schwarz will be available in November and sells at $100.00

http://blog.lostartpress.com/2014/09/16/inside-roubos-the-book-of-plates/

Question About ‘The Book of Plates’ This looks to be a great new work.
Posted on September 16, 2014 by Chris Schwarz

http://blog.lostartpress.com/2014/09/16/question-about-the-book-of-plates/
« Last Edit: September 18, 2014, 06:48:40 PM by chrisdefrance »
"These are the times that try men's souls: The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman."

Offline smart dog

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Re: re: Andre J. Roubo: Translation of “L’Art Du Menuisier”
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2014, 08:49:30 PM »
Hi Chris,
Look a little familiar:




dave
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Offline Kermit

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Re: re: Andre J. Roubo: Translation of “L’Art Du Menuisier”
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2014, 12:14:07 AM »
The Ruobo benches have been greeting a lot of play in the woodworking press. For some reason the continental bench designs caught on. Probably because of guys like Frid and Krenov. Currently there is increasing interest in English bench designs. I built one and promptly sold my Scandinavian bench.

http://blog.lostartpress.com/2014/08/13/for-2015-and-this-weekend-the-knockdown-workbench/

http://lostartpress.com/collections/dvds/products/the-naked-woodworker

I like Paul Sellers' video series. He shows you how to build a solid English bench without having a bench already. He starts with a pile of spruce, a pair of sawhorses, and minimal hand tools, and proceeds to build a bench in his back garden. It's a series of eleven videos.

https://m.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD39949332C7FB168

Nothing wrong with a Ruobo/continental bench at all. I just find the wide front apron and holdfast holes better suited to my way of handtool working.
"Anything worth doing is worth doing slowly." Mae West

Offline WadePatton

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Re: re: Andre J. Roubo: Translation of “L’Art Du Menuisier”
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2014, 12:33:48 AM »
frik R sum!


i'm sooo tired of trying to hold wooden stuff with my metalshop type setup.  Time to make a second work table for long wooden stuffs.
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Offline chrisdefrance

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Re: re: Andre J. Roubo: Translation of “L’Art Du Menuisier”
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2014, 12:40:58 AM »
Dave what a beautiful bench. This is something I would like to have in the house, maybe in my old office. You did fantastic work on this.
"These are the times that try men's souls: The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman."

Offline smart dog

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Re: re: Andre J. Roubo: Translation of “L’Art Du Menuisier”
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2014, 02:27:22 AM »
Hi Chris,
Thanks.  Not only is it beautiful, but it is the best gun and furniture bench I've ever used.  It is fabulous.

dave
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Re: re: Andre J. Roubo: Translation of “L’Art Du Menuisier”
« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2014, 03:24:23 AM »
frik R sum!


i'm sooo tired of trying to hold wooden stuff with my metalshop type setup.  Time to make a second work table for long wooden stuffs.

I've got the same problem. I have a planer, a jointer and a wood lathe sitting on my steel layout table. I don't have the lathe set up yet. Heck, I ain't got no room. When I use my torch, I have to feed my hoses around my bandsaw. My blacksmith shop is now doubling as a woodshop. Actually it's quadrupling if you include being used as a garage and a gunsmith shop. Not enough room to swing a cat in there. I'm restoring a 150 year old Swan mortising machine and it has been brutal switching between tools. As soon as I can, I want to build a small wood work table that will sit on my layout table. It includes a Moxon vise that I can use for dovetailing. I simply don't have room for a full-blown work bench and can't afford a whole new shop...yet.

Offline chrisdefrance

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Re: re: Andre J. Roubo: Translation of “L’Art Du Menuisier”
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2014, 07:22:52 PM »
Dave -

You have constructed your bench to last a lifetime. It is complete and it is a beautiful work in wood.

The bench on the right side has two leg vices, one on each end. You placed a vertical holdfast board centered on the right side. What is that called ? Is it fixed or does it slide left or right ?

On the left side of the bench, you have placed two vices. What are these and who are they made by ?

I notice that you have not built a tool tray. I do not want that item either. The table top is sixteen two x fours wide ? Are these alternating pine and fir ? If not what did you use ? 

Now that it is done, would you change anything ?

Thanks, Chris
"These are the times that try men's souls: The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman."

Offline smart dog

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Re: re: Andre J. Roubo: Translation of “L’Art Du Menuisier”
« Reply #8 on: September 22, 2014, 12:19:50 AM »
Hi Chris,
I am sorry that I did not get back to you right away.  I've been gone for the last 3 days to the Eastern PA longrifle show.  I attached more photos showing construction and use of the bench.  As Kermit mentioned, Roubo benches are getting a lot of play for the very good reason that they are superb.  The English "Nicholson" design is also a very good bench and much more economical on wood.  I've not found anything on my bench that I want to change yet.  I am still discovering the many ways I can use it and I have not found any work that could not be anchored to that bench in a very efficient and effective way.  The device between the leg vises is a "sliding deadman".  It serves much the same purpose as the wide apron on the English bench that Kermit described.  The bottom has a "V" groove that slides on the leg stretcher, which has the top shaped as an inverted "V".  The top of the deadman has a shoulder that fits into a groove under the top of the bench.  I can slide the deadman to any position between the leg vises.  I made the leg vises from maple boards and used hardware from Lee Valley.  The other vices on the bench are pattern makers vises that I bought long ago.  The height of my bench is 34".  That height means that when I clamp a stock as shown in the photo, as I gouge the barrel channel, at the bottom of my stroke, my arm is almost straight.  I found that prevents the painful tendonitis that I usually got when I inlet a swamped barrel by hand.  I use the pattern makers vises when I want the work higher.  I mounted an LED lamp on a wooden block with a 3/4" dowel that fits into the holes on the bench top.  I can then move the lamp wherever I need it and with the overhead lights and windows, I have all the light I need.  As the photos show, the bench is held together with drawbored oak dowels, which will never loosen.  I did not include a tool tray because they just collect sawdust and chips.  It will long outlast me.  
dave





« Last Edit: September 22, 2014, 12:22:38 AM by smart dog »
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Offline Rolf

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Re: re: Andre J. Roubo: Translation of “L’Art Du Menuisier”
« Reply #9 on: September 22, 2014, 10:18:26 AM »
 The other vices on the bench are pattern makers vises that I bought long ago.
dave

How are these vices mounted on the bench?

Best regards
Rolf

Offline smart dog

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Re: re: Andre J. Roubo: Translation of “L’Art Du Menuisier”
« Reply #10 on: September 22, 2014, 03:11:31 PM »
Hi Rolf,
They pivot on 5/8" thick threaded rods that fit through any of the holes on my bench top.  A huge wing nut tightens down on the rod locking the vise in place.  I have thin oak squares that sit like washers between the bottoms of the vises and the bench to prevent the vises from marring the bench top.  I can move them wherever I have a hole.

dave
"Flick Lives!"