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| | |-+  Staining a Sycamore stock
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Author Topic: Staining a Sycamore stock  (Read 3481 times)
40Haines
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« on: February 21, 2009, 03:07:52 PM »

Sorry guys, there used to be some info here on this subject.

Can't seem to find it now.

In a couple weeks I will be staining a Sycamore stock on the current project.

I just wanted to see if there was anybodies experience to build on before I start my test strips.

This would be good - Maybe a little darker

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Metalshaper
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« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2009, 07:11:08 PM »

THAT is my Buddy's Gun.. Search for posts by MRW, to find his profile and send him a PM.. IF you have trouble locating it.. hit me a note offline,, and I'll give you his e-mail addy.

and to up the ante a bit.. I'll send him a note, to come in here and find you!  Wink

That should do it, I think???

Respect Always
Metalshaper
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Eric Kettenburg
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« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2009, 08:13:19 PM »

I'd be curious to know what your thoughts are on working sycamore, and which type of sycamore it was.  American sycamore - the big flaky white trees along streets and riverbanks?  Or Euopean 'sycamore' which is something a bit different I think?  Have seen some wild english 'sycamore' which is also sold as curly english maple.  Huh
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Acer Saccharum
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« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2009, 09:08:31 PM »

Sycamore and maple are related, I believe. American Sycamore is also called buttonwood, for its delicious woodturning attribute. I think the English variety is called Plane tree, or something like that. http://www.2020site.org/trees/plane.html
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Tom Curran's web site : http://tcurran.com/
40Haines
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« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2009, 12:38:46 AM »

I have had this blank for 30years or more and it was old when I got it.

It is infact American Sycamore, 1/4 sawn

I believe some call it lacewood but I think that is a western US variety.

The wood cuts really well (Bandsaw-Router).

Your hand tools need to be very very sharp and you work pretty slowly.

Splintering has not been a problem.

I tried a little carving on a scrap piece and the wood goes from hard to soft to hard very quickly and I am afraid of a lot of chipping with the detail work so there won't be much carving going on, I wish I was a better carver, but, have learned to live with my short cumin's

I was thinking of using tea (source of Tanic acid) and then fuming the wood with ammonia but I don't think it will bring out enough pop in the wood.

I have been told AF will make it to dark and vinegar/iron is just about perfect.

I think first I will just try a sample with 4-5 coats of Tung oil and use that for a base line and go from there.

I like to use 5-6 coats of highly diluted LMF stains and have had good results going that route, but to be honest, you really don't know how that will end up - although it always looks pretty.

With some help from the members, a little luck and some crossed fingers it will turn out just fine.

The next project I plan to see what happens when you use a 400 year old piece of elm - but first things first.

Thanks guys !

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George F.
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« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2009, 08:06:46 PM »

I was told at a lumber yard that deals with just about all species of wood, both exotic and domestic, that Lacewood was a sort of Austriallian oak.   ...Geo.
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Stophel
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Chris Immel


« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2009, 03:41:27 PM »

American Sycamore wood doesn't look like English sycamore, which looks all the world like maple.

On a TV show, the guy was turning a wooden bowl.  He said the wood was sycamore, and I thought, "That ain't sycamore, that's curly maple, sycamore is orangey with zillions of rays", but then he said it was English sycamore, which is something else.
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I'm sorry, I thought we were building flintlocks...not fiberglass stocked, tactical bolt action sniper rifles.
Acer Saccharum
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« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2009, 05:05:46 PM »

I looked up in my tree book, and then forgot almost everything except that: English sycamore has 'acer' in its Latin name, because the leaves look like maple leaves. So it's not a relative, just a look-alike in the leaf department.

Stoph, you going to Dixon's? I'll share a sixer of Yueglings with ya. Oh, please say yes.

(here we go again)

Dixon's......huzzay! Hurrah!

Acer
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Stophel
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Chris Immel


« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2009, 05:17:54 PM »

I really don't think I'm going to be able to this year.  I would like to, though.
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I'm sorry, I thought we were building flintlocks...not fiberglass stocked, tactical bolt action sniper rifles.
MRW
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« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2009, 10:10:02 AM »

Ok finally had the cyber police get this site unblock , they installed a new filter and it got all of my BP sites blocked, you know how it is in schools we sure wouldn't want kids to be able to research a worthwhile hobby and develop interests in something other than Xbox games. Anyway that pic is of my UH rifle and the stock is plain old Kansas sycamore that is 1/4 sawn. I have made two stock from this plank the first one was for a mule ear rifle for my son which i stained with a tar paint thinner stain which looked ok but I then redid somethings on the rifle and the second time used aqua fortis on it which is what the UH has on it as well I'll try and post some more pics of the stocks as soon as I can acess photobucket which is also blocked where I have the pics stored
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Robert Wolfe
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« Reply #10 on: February 25, 2009, 10:10:17 AM »

OK. In England "sycamore" or "sycamore maple" is Acer pseudoplatanus (a true maple). American sycamore is Platanus occidenatlis. In Europe, the genus Platanus (our sycamore) is called "plane tree." Note the species name of the sycamore maple is "false plane tree".

This is why scientists use fixed latin names rather than variable common names. I know, more than you wanted to know!
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Robert Wolfe
Mike R
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longrifles and living history


« Reply #11 on: February 25, 2009, 11:22:28 AM »

I have used american sycamore on a knife handle and stained it with Feibings leather dye--worked for me. 
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Mike Roberts, Louisiana Territory
T.C.Albert
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« Reply #12 on: February 25, 2009, 01:32:57 PM »

I have seen where traditional hand tool makers refered to "plane tree" wood (American Sycamore) as an "unfortunate" choice of wood to make wood planes out of...that scared me out of ever trying it for much...but what gives? Why the name if it wont make suitable planes? Sure would like to know the deal...( no pun intended...I know "deal" is English pine right?)
TCA
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MRW
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« Reply #13 on: February 25, 2009, 01:59:56 PM »

I am guessing here but plain probably means what it looks like plank sawn. Unless you 1/4 saw it  straight grained sycamore has about zero grain pattern just look at the inside of a old set of dresser drawers and look how plain that wood is most of it is sycamore
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Stophel
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Chris Immel


« Reply #14 on: February 25, 2009, 03:22:47 PM »

Pallet makers around here use Sycamore a good bit.  Pretty much it ain't used for anything else.  Light orange-ish color, FULL of rays and rather gaudy.
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I'm sorry, I thought we were building flintlocks...not fiberglass stocked, tactical bolt action sniper rifles.
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