Author Topic: Building a shop  (Read 31022 times)

Offline thecapgunkid

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Building a shop
« on: August 09, 2015, 10:28:32 PM »
That's right, not just tools, but the whole shop...

Part One.  You gotta Love Lincoln Logs.

Unless the Administrator  whacks it, this thread is going to be in several parts because the project was too long to write about in one shot.  A lot of guys can post their workbenches, but not a lot get to build a shop from the ground up.  My daughter bought the new house in Newmanstown, Pa., and we left Connecticut to move in with her.   I didn’t want to just build a gunmaking/leatherworking bench.  I wanted to build and customize the whole shop. Then I wanted it to be portable so some other lunatic could do it just by reading my post, and I did not want it top be too modern.

It was gonna be a cabin,  built indoors until we could scrape up enough money to either build a slab or install pylons in the back yard.  That meant it had to be capable of dis-assembly and transport.  It also meant I could defer the roof, true-ing it up, adding features and details of windows and door  until later.  If I don’t get dead I’ll post that part when I do it.

I got the idea by viewing the riflemakers shop in Jacobsburg in 2013.  Also, I always had a fancy for Lincoln Logs.  I always wanted  a log cabin and Pennsylvania is loaded with historical samples.  Now, with the move,  I had another shot at a shop.  It’d have a bench that would platform everything from Flintlocks to shoemaking to reloading for my BP sixguns and Yellow Boy to household projects.  It’d have plenty of storage and only two  outlets for power tools that could be hidden when stepping out of the century and using hand tools,  It’d also hold my  shop vac.  Every man should have a shop vac.  If they’d a had it, they’d a used it.  Ouch.

Railroad ties or hewn logs were too bulky and expensive.  Pine or Cedar planking was too thin and flimsy.  Drive around historical sites enough and you will see plenty of rough planks and hand hewn timber.  The answer came when I wandered into Home Depot for a drill and tap and dye for the tang bolt on the Jaeger I was working on; Decking Lumber…nice thick planks that were already treated and could be worked with a minimum of tools.  I could notch the ends.  I could make a cabin.  What a concept.

I bought a cheap notebook and started to draw plans.  Each page had one level of  planking  until I had plans for about seven feet of height.  I drew in the cutouts for the windows and the structure of the main, built in bench level by level.   I concocted a numbering system for each plank when it came time to take it down and move it.
Here’s what I started out with;
•   A spiral bound notebook to make notes and plans; one page, one level of planks with notes
•   About $750.00 of decking lumber in the form of 2x4 and 2x8 in 8,10 and 12 foot lengths.
•   A Bow Saw ( with a back up saber saw and rotary saw for true up)
•   A Maul
•   An inch wide chisel to finish cut notches
•   Two templates for notching the end of the logs and for making chocks ( you know…those short little Lincoln Logs you used to throw at your brother when he pestered you) which would be interspersed on the main logs  to hold them together just like Lincoln Log Cabins.  The notches had to be a quarter of the width of the plank  and about a quarter to three eighths inch  wider than the thickness of the plank so they would all seat well.
•   My DVD entitled “Alone In The Wilderness” in which a guy named Dick Proenneke built an 11x14 foot cabin in the middle of Alaska and then lived there for thirty years.  Do the search and buy the DVD.  IT’s worth it.
•   My Rockwell Jaw Horse and Kreg Joiner
•   A bunch of  two to three inch plasterboard screws which would be replaced by wood dowels in the final project to assist in holding the planks together.  I wanted dowels because folks did not use plasterboard screws in the eighteenth century

Here’s what I ended up with;

Looking from the outside ( with my guncart in the foreground).  Once I set the foundation outside, it'll get roofed, trued up, windowed and doored, floored and set up permanently



IN the doorway, looking to the main bench;



IN the door, looking left at my BP reloading




In the doorwqay looking toward the left at some of my tools;




In the doorway looking right at my cordwaining area






Next Post, how to build a cabin without being at all capable.


Offline ottawa

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Re: Building a shop
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2015, 01:38:35 AM »
after looking at this I started rebuilding my Black smith shop thinking this is way cool way to do it . got the frame up then a sign a little ways in town goes up fence post .25cents each. less then 25$ and my shop walls will be up.
 thanks for the Idea
I'm not strange i just like building stuff

Offline ddoyle

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Re: Building a shop
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2015, 08:06:12 AM »
That is alot of fun. I keep wanting to do something similiar on a trailer to reduce the bother involved in chasing my wife's profession around.

Have you given any thought about keeping rust at bay? Unheated buildings are kinda tough to keep the point under control.

Offline Dphariss

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Re: Building a shop
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2015, 04:56:01 AM »
Where I live it would need double walls with 4" of insulation between.
I try to keep the winter time temp in the shop about 65 24/7. But I have gas heat too...
Dan
No, sir, I don't give 'em $#*!, I just tell the truth and they think it's $#*!. Harry S Truman

Offline Daryl

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Re: Building a shop
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2015, 11:44:16 PM »
 

That looks like my old Dillon 450.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2015, 11:44:42 PM by Daryl »
Daryl

"a gun without hammers is like a spaniel without ears" King George V

goinslow

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Re: Building a shop
« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2015, 05:04:40 AM »
Now THAT I like!! Been looking for a neat way to build the misses a out building and think I just found it.
Aaron

Offline heelerau

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Re: Building a shop
« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2017, 02:46:05 AM »
That is a really neat shop ! how did it finish up?  I like that ver early style saddle, who made it?

cheers

Gordon
Keep yor  hoss well shod an' yor powdah dry !

Offline thecapgunkid

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Re: Building a shop
« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2017, 02:38:52 PM »
heelaru...I bought an old saddle tree off e-bay and made the saddle top.  It goes on my Cowboy Action gun cart because I can't stand around for more than two or three stages withoout a back ache and have to sit down.

Daryl...Close but no cigar.  It's a Dillon 550 with Lee Dies because I can cycle Black POwder through their red powder chargers.


A while has gone by since this original post.  I have since re-arranged the shop  ( like I'm the only guy in the world who re-arranges his shop) and left it in the garage.

I scrapped the original plan to move it outside when we could afford a slab because, intending to true up the joints with treated 2X4's and have them support a roof, I saw a neighbors trampoline land on another neighbor's roof because this new neighborhood gets 40 mile an hour winds when everybody else gets 20 mile an hour winds.

I didn't want to end up in OZ, and can control the temperature easier in the garage.  My wife's car gets the other bay.

Capgun

Offline heelerau

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Re: Building a shop
« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2017, 01:45:01 AM »
I would not mind finding a workshop such as that windblown onto our farm !!
Keep yor  hoss well shod an' yor powdah dry !