Author Topic: Poor Man's Beading & Marking Tool  (Read 33517 times)

Offline moleeyes36

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Poor Man's Beading & Marking Tool
« on: May 07, 2016, 05:57:46 PM »
I subscribe to Paul Seller's website, as several on the ALR do, and get a lot of helpful (and free) wood working videos.  I just received this one today and found it to be very applicable to gun making.  It can take a lot of the work out of making simple mouldings.  It won't do all a scratch block will do, but it's pretty versatile.  And it costs a few pennies to make.  Check this video on the website below.



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Offline T*O*F

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Re: Poor Man's Beading & Marking Tool
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2016, 06:20:14 PM »
I have shown this same idea a couple of different times here within the last several years.  It's an idea I came up with independently a long time ago whilst working on moldings.  He probably stole it from me.
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Offline moleeyes36

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Re: Poor Man's Beading & Marking Tool
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2016, 06:58:42 PM »
I have shown this same idea a couple of different times here within the last several years.  It's an idea I came up with independently a long time ago whilst working on moldings.  He probably stole it from me.

I guess he just knows a good idea when he sees one.
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Offline jerrywh

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Re: Poor Man's Beading & Marking Tool
« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2016, 07:48:10 PM »
 What impressed me is how sharp the guys chisels are.
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Offline Candle Snuffer

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Re: Poor Man's Beading & Marking Tool
« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2016, 03:08:26 AM »
I can set and (have) watched his videos for hours on some evenings rather then hanging out on the TV or computer.

I watched one where he restored old block planes - he can really sharpen a tool for sure.
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Offline thecapgunkid

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Re: Poor Man's Beading & Marking Tool
« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2017, 12:49:08 PM »
What a great idea.  Now I gotta start a project just so I can run my forearm moulding with a piece of Oak and filed wood screws.

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Offline gusd

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Re: Poor Man's Beading & Marking Tool
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2017, 04:06:06 PM »
Great Video, loved the little gauge to hold drill square both ways!
gus 8)

Offline thecapgunkid

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Re: Poor Man's Beading & Marking Tool
« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2017, 01:11:15 PM »
tried this, and it worked.  The only issue arising is that the video uses pine, whereas the harder maple stock needs a light and repetitive stroking.  Also, I would recommend several of these where the woodscrew is cemented in place so it does not turn and guide the line off the desired track.  I made two, one for upper and one for lowed molding on the forestock.

I'd go so far as to make one for each project to ensure desired positioning. 

Don't shoot yore eye out, kid

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Offline WadePatton

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Re: Poor Man's Beading & Marking Tool
« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2017, 05:32:59 PM »
What impressed me is how sharp the guys chisels are.

There's only one sharp, the edges of the bevel meet crisply or they don't. 

And then there's the polish-which he (Paul Sellers) shows in a planing video where a 250 sharpened iron is no less effective that those polished many grits higher.  The only difference is in the finish left on the work surface.

and this is the battle in sharpening shaving razors.  You get them fully sharp, and then refine the edge with finer grits and strop variously and it's never exactly the same, and comfort is not a function of sharp.  I ramble.




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