Author Topic: Virginia?  (Read 5383 times)

Offline nord

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Virginia?
« on: April 03, 2009, 07:34:55 PM »
Flintlock Musket that according to Wallace Gustler, is from Virginia. I have to take his word for it since I am in no way an expert. There are no markings on it so should probably go into the "unknown" category.

Addendum 01/15/09:



This piece is in its original flintlock condition with the only repair made to the toe of the stock. The original piece of wood was used for the repair and nailed into place with two small nails. The full stock appears to be made of Walnut in excellent condition and still retains the original finish. The butt of the gun is 1 3/4 inches thick with a length of pull of 13 inches. The lock functions perfectly, and as stated earlier is in its original configuration and is unmarked as to the maker. The barrel is 44 1/8-inches long with no markings or visible proof marks. The first 12-inches of the barrel are octagon with a transition “ring” to round for the remainder of its length. The .60 caliber barrel is rifled for the first couple of inches into the bore and is smooth the rest of the way. I have been told that this is sometimes called “Paradox” rifling and could be used for both patched ball and shot. There was enough rifling at the end of the barrel to give a patched ball some spin for better accuracy. Any thoughts or opinions on this would be appreciated since I have never ran across a barrel rifled in this manner before and really have no idea why it was done this way. In response to reply #6, the front finial on the trigger guard doesn't have a "tit" as found on New England guns. When shown to Wallace Gusler at the 2004 show at Knoxville Tenn., he felt that it was Virgina and from what I remember of the conversation, the guard may have been the main reason, along with the cheek rest. It seems that there were other reasons, but I don't recall what they were. I have based the attribution on his information as I really don't know. I appreciate the opinions and information given and welcome them all.

Trigger Guard - This piece is in its original flintlock condition with the only repair made to the toe of the stock. The original piece of wood was used for the repair and nailed into place with two small nails. The full stock appears to be made of Walnut in excellent condition and still retains the original finish. The butt of the gun is 1 3/4 inches thick with a length of pull of 13 inches. The lock functions perfectly, and as stated earlier is in its original configuration and is unmarked as to the maker. The barrel is 44 1/8-inches long with no markings or visible proof marks. The first 12-inches of the barrel are octagon with a transition “ring” to round for the remainder of its length. The .60 caliber barrel is rifled for the first couple of inches into the bore and is smooth the rest of the way. I have been told that this is sometimes called “Paradox” rifling and could be used for both patched ball and shot. There was enough rifling at the end of the barrel to give a patched ball some spin for better accuracy. Any thoughts or opinions on this would be appreciated since I have never ran across a barrel rifled in this manner before and really have no idea why it was done this way. In response to reply #6, the front finial on the trigger guard doesn't have a "tit" as found on New England guns. When shown to Wallace Gusler at the 2004 show at Knoxville Tenn., he felt that it was Virgina and from what I remember of the conversation, the guard may have been the main reason, along with the cheek rest. It seems that there were other reasons, but I don't recall what they were. I have based the attribution on his information as I really don't know. I appreciate the opinions and information given and welcome them all.











Posts: 781


Comments:   
   
Re: Unknown (Ref. 090111-2)
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2009, 03:34:11 PM »    Reply with quote
Fascinating gun! It might look like a musket, but I see six rifling grooves peeking out of that muzzle. How about calling it "Unknown - Virginia?"
XXXX    
   
Re: Unknown (Ref. 090111-2)
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2009, 06:12:12 PM »    I concur with "Unknown--Virginia," if we feel confident enough about the Virginia attribution.
XXXX
    
   
Re: Unknown (Ref. 090111-2)
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2009, 08:47:05 AM »    
I suggest with posting as unknown with possible VA attribution. Wonder what  Doug and Gary think ( both Virginians).
XXXX.


   
Re: Unknown (Ref. 090111-2)
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2009, 11:21:56 AM »    Maybe I'm missing something, but what about ths gun points to VA?
Maybe the cheekpiece?
I think I need some 'learnin' on this one.
XXXX
   
Re: Unknown (Ref. 090111-2)
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2009, 06:55:43 PM »    Interesting Rifle,........ I'm with XXX on what makes it Virginia? (not that maybe it couldn't be) I see traits that remind me of New England.  The stock architecture, the lock panels, cheek piece. and the long RR pipes.   Contrary to the New England concept is the trigger guard.  I owned a Mass rifle that was very similar down to the rifling.  Just some thoughts. XXXX
   
    
   
Re: Unknown (Ref. 090111-2)
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2009, 11:30:04 PM »    Nice gun with straight rifling, or so it would appear. Good lines, but it has an ususual cheek rest. It looks more like a New England piece than anything else, but to prove it? The tang is similar to NE guns and the triggerguard has the front reinforcing lug. Would like to see the TG full on, to find out if it has the tit on the front finial. If wood isn't walnut, it could be cherry.
It's a nice atticky lookin gun and would look good on the Library in the unlocated and unknown deptartment.
XXXX
   
In Memory of Lt. Catherine Hauptman Miller 6/1/21 - 10/1/00 & Capt. Raymond A. Miller 12/26/13 - 5/15/03...  They served proudly.