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|-+  General discussion
| |-+  Gun Building
| | |-+  stain advice
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Author Topic: stain advice  (Read 2258 times)
WadePatton
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« Reply #15 on: December 18, 2012, 12:17:34 AM »

Wow,

now that is a cartoon carrot stage eh?  making order now for more colors.  Dark brown by itself doesn't give any other-than-cocoa hues in my current wood...but then i've not AF'd any yet either.  AF solution is in route as well.
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Dphariss
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« Reply #16 on: December 18, 2012, 01:20:19 AM »

I,m ready to stain the stock, tried lmf nut brown on a scrap piece and on this stock it is very dark and very RED. would like to tone down the red and get a little more of a golden brown on this stock. anything I could mix with the nut brown or should I go with a different stain completely. suggestions please!

I do not believe these stains are completely color fast. I might be wrong but doubt it.
Different stain?
It boggles my mind the hoops people will jump through to to use this stuff (3-4 coats or more) then not have it hold its color when ferric nitrate is easy to use and will remain the same color as long as anyone is likely to want to look at it. HOWEVER, the builder must then accept the natural color that is produced by the individual piece of wood rather than coloring it with this dye and that to get the color he thinks it should be.
Much the same thing can be said about stock finishes.
By buying into the "newer is better" mantra of the industrial revolution people have convinced themselves that hard is easy and easy is hard. One coat is harder than 4. 20 coats over the course of a month is easier than 2 over 3 days.
That elastic is not durable and brittle is. Or that stocks can be "waterproofed".  Just because the can says its fast and easy does not mean its the fastest or the easiest or the best for the purpose in the short or long term. In stock finish I have never seen a thin petroleum solvent based (usually 70%+) finish that was as easy to use as traditional oil based finishes and few look as good or are as durable in real life.

Dan
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JoeG
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« Reply #17 on: December 18, 2012, 02:53:00 AM »

I'm with you Dan

I'll stick with an  acid stain and oil finish

Aqua fortis leaves a nice reddish under tone with a dark stripe  

 a 10 % solution of straight nitric acid and a coat
of potassium permanganate  gives you a yellow undertone with dark brown stripe

neither one fades with age

add an oil finish and what more could you ask
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FL-Flintlock
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« Reply #18 on: December 18, 2012, 05:58:20 AM »

In stock finish I have never seen a thin petroleum solvent based (usually 70%+) finish that was as easy to use as traditional oil based finishes and few look as good or are as durable in real life.
Dan



That stuff is sold by Brownells with the statement, "resist scuffs and scratches but provide the look and feel of traditional, hand-rubbed oil finishes, without all the hard work."  C'mon Dan, it's from Brownells and every claim made by Brownells is taken on blind faith as absolute fact, science and physics be damned.  Why waste time with anything when you just spray this stuff on and not even have to rub?
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WadePatton
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« Reply #19 on: December 18, 2012, 11:13:39 AM »

hey who has time left for rubbing and buffing after all those hours of inletting and shaping and carving? 

spray and play!

 Wink Shocked Huh Roll Eyes
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John Tygart
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« Reply #20 on: December 18, 2012, 11:57:59 AM »

I do agree that tradition oil finishes are best and I'm using Chambers product on this rifle.  The last time I did this was 40 years ago and that was BLO.  As to the choice of acid vs stain, I chose the later because I've seen comments here about variable or inconsistent results with acids and for someone with my level of experience, or lack there of, stain seemed to offer more controllable results.  I'll worry about the color fastness 20 years from now.  Ok, maybe AF for my next rifle, I plan on sticking with this hobby and it's a constant learning experience.
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WadePatton
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« Reply #21 on: December 18, 2012, 09:31:59 PM »

Hey John, I don't see it as either/or on the staining.  I see too many fine examples of mixed product-where AF was used and then stain(s).  Won't know until the scrap pieces tell me what works...and as i unnerstand it, the next one will be different.
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