Author Topic: Woodworking Hand saw  (Read 3094 times)

Offline JCKelly

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Woodworking Hand saw
« on: August 22, 2017, 10:54:07 PM »
An Englishman named Paul Sellers has a fine book and a series of blogs on the use of various handtools - planes, scrapers, &c. I'd say he's the early 20th century version of that early 19th century guy on PBS' Woodworker series.
If you inlet your sliding wood patchbox lid with a milling machine you will NOT find this of interest.
Here is how to sharpen a woodworking handsaw. As I have a couple of Grampa's that have become dull, it is of interest to me.

https://paulsellers.com/2016/04/28348/

Offline mfharper

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Re: Woodworking Hand saw
« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2017, 01:42:11 PM »
I've been following Paul Sellers for a good while. He has lots of stuff posted up on YouTube now as well. Great information there on sharpening chisels too.

Offline burnt

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Re: Woodworking Hand saw
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2017, 04:17:28 PM »
Mr Sellers has a series of videos showing sharpening and selection of spokeshaves. These have opened up a whole new direction for me in shaping the whole front end on rifles/ fowlers. A sharp spokeshave removes thin ribbons of wood from the curliest of maple and splintery walnut leaving a smooth surface. It is faster and does less damage to the wood than rasps and files.
Kevin
PEACE is that glorious moment in history when everyone stands around reloading.  Thomas Jefferson

Offline WadePatton

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Re: Woodworking Hand saw
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2018, 07:30:33 AM »
Me too as well. Paul has taught me lots.

I built the workbench as he did (older series)-the one he did out in the yard.  Will use same techniques for any next one too.  Simple, solid, low materials cost, yet not too difficult to disassemble for moving.

I've been following Paul Sellers for a good while. He has lots of stuff posted up on YouTube now as well. Great information there on sharpening chisels too.
Hold to the Wind

Offline Pukka Bundook

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Re: Woodworking Hand saw
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2018, 01:44:41 AM »
An old friend back home, (Joiner and cabinet maker) always maintained the best hand saw was a Henry Disston D8.   Made in the USA.  :-)
He was a joiner in the days when if you wanted sash windows, you ripped the wood down and planed it before you started.

Ken Roberts. a very fine man.

Offline WadePatton

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Re: Woodworking Hand saw
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2018, 05:55:32 PM »
An old friend back home, (Joiner and cabinet maker) always maintained the best hand saw was a Henry Disston D8.   Made in the USA.  :-)
He was a joiner in the days when if you wanted sash windows, you ripped the wood down and planed it before you started.

Ken Roberts. a very fine man.

Even the Disstons need setting and keeping sharp.  Paul Sellers teaches all that. Even how to set teeth without a setting device. This sharpening and truing/set, methinks, is the most important aspect of hand-saw use, same as chisels and planes and well, anything hand-powered.  It's just that most folks think they know how to sharpen a plane iron or chisel (and plenty can).  Saws and drills are a bit more complicated, but just as important for satisfactory work.

I sharpened an auger in the field one day as I happened into the work (holes in a post) after one hole had been drilled.  As the fresh person, I took over and looked at the bit-woefully dull.  Having no proper file, I pressed a chainsaw file into service and cleaned up the leading edges as best I could.  Then drilled the hole without much thought about it as the bit worked well-enough. It might have taken a minute or so at the most.

I then looked up and there stood two folks with jaws on the ground (full agape). :o ???

AT that point they commented about the first hole taking half-an-hour to drill.    ::)

It was a Kodak moment for sharp tools, no matter the job.   8)

« Last Edit: April 17, 2018, 05:57:26 PM by WadePatton »
Hold to the Wind

Offline Pukka Bundook

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Re: Woodworking Hand saw
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2018, 05:43:58 PM »
Wade,

I didn't say Disstons didn't need sharpening. I said he reckoned they were the best saws.

My own Disston needed to be stripped and re-toothed, as they were all 'cows and calves" when I got it.
Sharpening these saws with a regular saw-set has to be done right, as you can knock the teeth out of them very easily otherwise. Set them from only half way down the tooth, don't set from the base.
I  have set against wood with a cross -peen hammer.  a good even job can be done................. as long as the teeth are big enough to see!

Offline Ted Martens

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Re: Woodworking Hand saw
« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2018, 03:21:42 PM »
"Sharp solves 'most all problems" is an old but accurate truth for hand tools.

http://www.vintagesaws.com/library/primer/sharp.html

This is the best article I've found on filing; good explanations of tooth angles, rake, and fleam, plus file size recommendations.
"I think it an act of prudence to make provision in time of security, for what would be required in time of danger."    R.E. Lee

Offline Tim Crosby

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Re: Woodworking Hand saw
« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2018, 12:18:35 AM »
"Sharp solves 'most all problems" is an old but accurate truth for hand tools.

http://www.vintagesaws.com/library/primer/sharp.html

This is the best article I've found on filing; good explanations of tooth angles, rake, and fleam, plus file size recommendations.

 Maybe I should post this under "get a life" but I thoroughly enjoyed that. Learned how to sharpen a saw as a kid from my maternal Grandfather who was a Millwright for the NYC from the mid 20's to early 60's. Thanks for posting.

  Tim C.

Offline Karl Kunkel

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Re: Woodworking Hand saw
« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2018, 04:41:44 AM »
Dumb luck - the thread above rang a bell. 

A few years ago we were cleaning out my wife's Uncles house, I picked out an old saw, because it looked like a well cared for old saw.  I just looked at it again, it's a Henry Disston D-8 Lightweight Skewback, probably from the 1940's.

You learn all sorts of stuff on this forum.
Kunk

Offline KC

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Re: Woodworking Hand saw
« Reply #10 on: August 14, 2018, 06:14:48 PM »
I've been having fun picking up cheap old saws at flea markets and fixing them up. You can get them as low as $2-$4 many times and even though mid-century Disstons aren't the most collectible, they're better than most modern saws. You only need so many saws, though.
K.C. Clem
Bradenton, FL

Offline Pukka Bundook

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Re: Woodworking Hand saw
« Reply #11 on: August 15, 2018, 07:12:19 AM »
Interesting on the Henry Disston, Karl!  :-)

My only rip-saw is a Joseph Peace. Very fine saw.  Likely made around 1900 at a guess.  Used it to cut out the stock for that snapping matchlock last.