Author Topic: 1st attempt at a shot pouch  (Read 3241 times)

Offline Brokennock

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1st attempt at a shot pouch
« on: December 06, 2017, 05:30:14 AM »
Couldn't find a thread on posting pictures so we'll see how this goes.
This is my 1st attempt at construction a shot pouch for use with my smooth rifle. I used a bag I already own as a basis for size of the bag, and for my reasoning in making the flap a little oversize. I used an old MuzzleBlasts article about an original bag as basis for my strap attachment.  I have very limited tools and more limited work space so did the best I could with what I have.
Using this pigskin from Tandy,



I came up with this,
















So the "preview" feature isn't giving me a preview and I have no idea if the pics are working so I'm going to hit post and see what happens.
I'll continue if it works.

Offline Brokennock

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2017, 05:43:47 AM »
Okay, so I'll post the rest. Comments, questions, advise for next time, are all welcome. I did sew cotton mattress ticking to the strap to fight stretching.








I used that nasty Tandy "buckskin tanned" leather for the trim piece folded over the flat sewn edges at the top of the bag and flap. This was dyed with diluted Eco-Flo dye and then heavily oiled with mink oil on both sides and the outside then treated with Sno-Seal. Tandy's thinner waxed linen thread was used for all sewing except the button, their thicker thread was used there. I purposely cut the flap oversize with the intention of trimming it to final size once I saw how the bag sized out when full, the. I screwed up and trimmed the two vertical edges out of square with eachother.
Definitely some things I would/Will do differently if I do another one, but all in all, it works.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2017, 05:46:09 AM by Brokennock »

Offline Brokennock

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2017, 06:01:06 AM »
Not all shown here is in the bag for every outing, things are switched out depending on what is being hunted or if just target shooting. It will all fit, tightly, but would not be usable with it all in there. Cleaning/maintainence stuff is kept to a minimum and is in the less accessible rear section, what I need to reload and shoot is all that's in the front section. Alchohol prep wipes, toothpick halves/grilling skewer ends, and a flannel patch are in the little flat front pocket.















Thanks for looking

Offline Mike from OK

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2017, 06:51:01 AM »
I like it.

When you make something with your own hands you tend to be overly critical of your work. You know where each and every tiny mistake, crooked stitch, etc... is located. Most of it is stuff that no one will ever notice. Of course our own criticisms are what drive us to do better on subsequent attempts.

Thank you for sharing.

Mike

Offline Cory Joe Stewart

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2017, 06:57:19 AM »
Well done. 

Offline Brokennock

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2017, 08:02:11 AM »
Thank you gentlemen.
Mike,.i completely agree, we are usually our own harshest critics.

Offline Clark B

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2017, 08:12:39 AM »
Looks great. I'll offer only 1 critique. Those buttonholes. Learn to sew them by hand and the overall appearance of the bag will be much upgraded. (yes I know other parts are machine stitched, but those buttonholes catch the eye fast.

And where did you find that awesome ticking.
Psalms 144

Offline Brokennock

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2017, 07:21:22 PM »
Clark, not sure if you're being sarcastic, or if I should take your reply as a comliment,,,,,, nothing is machine stitched. I did use two different stitching wheels, poorly, to layout where the holes should be punched. I used closer spacing (big mistake) for the top trim piece, and, I think, the from flat pocket. Holes were punched with an awl found in an old tool box and slightly reshaped while sharpening.

I found that ticking at a Jo-Ann's fabric store many years ago. I'm calling it mattress ticking just from the best of my ability to remember. I bought it when I was buying some pillow ticking for patch material and for experimentation with fabric "shot cups."  It is much stiffer than pillow ticking, both due to being thicker and the way the stripes/color is applied, I think.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2017, 07:26:17 PM by Brokennock »

Offline Clark B

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2017, 08:31:05 PM »
Brokennock, in that case your hand stitching is excellent. From the pictures some of the areas look machine done. You have skill. Google up the buttonhole stitch. Pretty simple to master and makes any copy of an old styled item look even more outstanding.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2017, 12:40:03 AM by Clark B »
Psalms 144

Offline ddoyle

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2017, 09:01:44 PM »
Sure looks like alot of fun. I like the way the flap is arranged at it's bend it looks like it would keep the bag's shape and help to keep the weather out. My only critique would be that two or more tins in a bag is like carrying car keys or pocket change when hunting- might not make a difference but an ounce of prevention-------

Offline hanshi

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2017, 09:23:28 PM »
It's quality work, alright.  I like it all.
!Jozai Senjo! "always present on the battlefield"
Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.

Offline Brokennock

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2017, 05:10:01 AM »
ddoyle, I had the same concern over multiple tins creating noise, it's part of why I made the bag just barely big enough to hold both. That and being sewn flat with no gusset makes them stay put and not rattle.

Too tight it turns out, I had a tough reload this evening when I missed a shot at a for and she only ran 15 yards further away, and the other doe and the buck she was with didn't even move off, just changed position looking where that bad sound came from. Making the bag in late September, I haven't had a chance to hit the range and practice with it.

Offline KC

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2017, 05:00:12 PM »
That's a nice bag, I like it. You did a nice job on the stitching and I like the lining material, the colors look good with the leather. In fact, I like the whole kit.
K.C. Clem
Bradenton, FL

Offline Brokennock

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #13 on: December 09, 2017, 04:51:09 AM »
Thank you KC.

Offline thecapgunkid

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #14 on: December 21, 2017, 01:51:09 PM »
Mike from OK...When you make something with your own hands you tend to be overly critical of your work. You know where each and every tiny mistake, crooked stitch, etc... is located. Most of it is stuff that no one will ever notice. Of course our own criticisms are what drive us to do better on subsequent attempts.

He's dead right.  Don't overstate your flaws and keep going. Your best  efforts will get better each time you work and the grace of the people in this forum cannot be overstated.

Offline n stephenson

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #15 on: December 21, 2017, 05:01:19 PM »
I can see how your stitching could be mistaken for machine work. NICE JOB!!! look forward to seeing more of your work. Nate

Offline Hungry Horse

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #16 on: December 21, 2017, 06:35:16 PM »
A cure for the chrome tanned buckskin that is yellow as a school bus, and slick as a salamander, is to stitch it up smooth side in ( because brain tanned buckskin has no slick side)wash it in your wife’s washing machine with Rit dye remover. And, then hang it in the shade until it is just damp,  and rebrake it. I tumbled mine in the wife’s dryer with a couple of pairs of tennis shoes on the air cycle.
 Thirty years ago I was given a bunch of bright yellow buckskin. I tried everything to get it to look like braintanned. Finally I tried the dye remover in the washer with warm water, and it worked. My buckskins looked for all the world like braintanned, and have lasted longer than I did. I gave them to the local Order of the Arrow group in the local Boy Scout council.
 Also, fringe them before you wash them and the fringe will come out looking fantastic. Good luck.

  Hungry Horse

Offline Candle Snuffer

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #17 on: December 29, 2017, 03:25:58 PM »
Looks good Brokennock.  I enjoy making shooting bags myself.  My approach is the I don't want fancy, I want workable, and as long as those bags are workable - you've done a great job!  :)
Snuffer

Offline JohnnyFM

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #18 on: December 31, 2017, 02:14:34 PM »
You have talent my friend.  Pigskin makes an excellent bag, thin and strong.

Offline Brokennock

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2018, 12:41:22 PM »
Thank you.

Offline Black Hand

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Re: 1st attempt at a shot pouch
« Reply #20 on: January 01, 2018, 05:26:18 PM »
A cure for the chrome tanned buckskin that is yellow as a school bus, and slick as a salamander, is to stitch it up smooth side in ( because brain tanned buckskin has no slick side)wash it in your wife’s washing machine with Rit dye remover. And, then hang it in the shade until it is just damp,  and rebrake it. I tumbled mine in the wife’s dryer with a couple of pairs of tennis shoes on the air cycle.
 Thirty years ago I was given a bunch of bright yellow buckskin. I tried everything to get it to look like braintanned. Finally I tried the dye remover in the washer with warm water, and it worked. My buckskins looked for all the world like braintanned, and have lasted longer than I did. I gave them to the local Order of the Arrow group in the local Boy Scout council.
 Also, fringe them before you wash them and the fringe will come out looking fantastic. Good luck.

  Hungry Horse
Household bleach works too. I have a pair of winter moccasins I made over 15 years ago from yellow Elk that I still wear. After bleaching, the color was a light tan.