Author Topic: Fisher Rifle - Lynchburg, VA  (Read 857 times)

Offline Sawfiler

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Fisher Rifle - Lynchburg, VA
« on: June 13, 2018, 03:08:02 PM »
Found in an attic I was helping a family friend clean out. Not mine but I have permission to post photos. I expect it was stored in that attic in the 1960's or 70's and untouched since. The barrel is stamped "Fisher Lynchburg VA" and is .40 caliber, 41 inches long 7/8" straight. No markings on the lock. Ramrod is clearly a replacement. I am guessing 1840's, and assume this to be a mid to upper quality gun with the curly maple stock and patch box with hunters star inlay. Any input would be welcome.









































« Last Edit: June 13, 2018, 03:37:20 PM by Sawfiler »

Offline Molly

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Re: Fisher Rifle - Lynchburg, VA
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2018, 07:01:21 PM »
From what I have read, backlocks are more like 1860 right up to just beyond 1900. Whisker names Cyrus Fisher (b 1820) working in Lynchburg from 1850 to 1877.
Elkans Fisher of Lynchburg (b 1834) working in Lynchburg from 1850 to 1888.  John Fisher, Lynchburg 1850.  Levy Fisher in Lynchburg "before the civil war" as well as an O.S. Fisher of Strausburg and Lunchburg.  Oh yes, how about William B. Fisher, b 1814 d 1892.  William and Cyrus Fisher operated as the Lynchburg Gun and Pistol Emporium!!
« Last Edit: June 13, 2018, 07:16:20 PM by Molly »

Offline Sawfiler

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Re: Fisher Rifle - Lynchburg, VA
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2018, 07:09:51 PM »
You may be totally correct. I was basing my assumption on the full stock, buttplate style, checkering style and some of the other features based on my limited knowledge. If you can point me to further documentation I would appreciate it.

Offline Molly

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Re: Fisher Rifle - Lynchburg, VA
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2018, 07:18:11 PM »
Comment added to my original post.  This is all straight from Whiskers book but maybe you can check some of these names out.

Offline mbriggs

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Re: Fisher Rifle - Lynchburg, VA
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2018, 08:38:10 PM »
I have also seen the Fisher name with Lynchburg , Va. stamped on the barrel of a Colt pistol.  I believe the family owned a hardware store in Lynchburg and had their name stamped on weapons they sold.

Michael
C. Michael Briggs

Offline Molly

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Re: Fisher Rifle - Lynchburg, VA
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2018, 12:13:31 AM »
Yep, that's sort of the way I see it too.

Offline Tanselman

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Re: Fisher Rifle - Lynchburg, VA
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2018, 01:43:08 AM »
Back-action locks were in use well before 1860; I have a high grade rifle from Kentucky with a back-action lock that is dated in the signature "1837." In my experience, the early back-action locks were often stocked with a small side facing in front of lock, on both the lock side and on the reverse. The small side-facing disappeared within a few years, leaving the back-action gun smooth ahead of the lock on both the front and back sides, as yours is. Your inlays and box are not engraved from what I can see. I would date your back-action rifle to the late 1840s, maybe into the early 1850s. It's guard doesn't look later than that to me.The gun has a lot going for it with the forestock inlays, box, etc., plus decent bore size.  It would be nice to see larger photos of the rifle, the more "standard" half-shot views of each side from the butt out to about 10 inches past lock plate, to get a better feel for the overall gun. All the small photos are good for details, but not to get a good idea of the whole rifle.  Shelby Gallien

Offline Sawfiler

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Re: Fisher Rifle - Lynchburg, VA
« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2018, 03:52:02 AM »
The gun is currently in my dads safe, but I have easy access to it. I will try to get the more standard photos you are asking for this weekend. I also want to acknowledge Mr. mbriggs post about the stamping. The Lynchburg, VA is very clearly is a stamp as opposed to an engraving. I could very easily see this being a rifle made in one place and simply stamped at the retail store. In person it almost looks as if the stamp was struck twice and the second stamp did not quite line up as it appears to shadow itself. Also, you are correct, there is no engraving on any of the brass that I could discern. The only engraving I could see was on the lock which was almost obscured by the rust, most of it being on the hammer itself. In any event, it was not elaborate. I just wanted to share as this had obvious Virginia connections as so many folks seem to be attempting to emulate a rifle with true Virginia provenance. I can't say for sure this was made in VA, but I can sure say it was sold/used in VA. It was found and currently resides about 15 miles due south of Lynchburg. All comments and recommendations as to true origin are still welcome. This site is an awesome resource.

Offline David R.

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Re: Fisher Rifle - Lynchburg, VA
« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2018, 04:25:43 AM »
Wish there was one like it in my attic
I would have no quarrel with thee if thou be a friend of liberty.

Offline D. Buck Stopshere

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Re: Fisher Rifle - Lynchburg, VA
« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2018, 04:33:55 PM »
My Fisher rifle that I bought at the Greensboro Gun Show is in superb condition. The barrel is stamped "Wm & C Fisher  Lynchburg VA" for William & Cyrus Fisher. According to my research, William & Cyrus did most of the conversion work on the 1795 & 1816 flintlocks to percussion for arms in Virginia armories during the War Between The States

A family history page on the internet shows a near twin to my percussion .38 caliber, flame walnut stocked rifle. The family home was in Pembroke VA. The removal of the lock displays some adherence to English gunmakers. The mortise is smooth as if it were milled out with a fine bit. All the channels are smoothed out. The lock looks quite new for 160+ years. A bar-lock action, coupled with a single lever set trigger. All in all, a well-preserved rifle.

Adding to the beauty of the architecture, the rifle furniture is stocked in German Silver, and virtually, every piece, including the buttplate and triggerguard are superbly engraved. It makes me think that William or Cyrus had some training by an experienced gunsmith. It's also possible the engraving was done by someone in their employ.

I'll take some photos to add to this post or start a new post
I'd give my right arm to be ambidextrous.

NMLRA Field Rep- North Carolina