Author Topic: David Rose II  (Read 3438 times)

timM

  • Guest
David Rose II
« on: July 26, 2008, 03:30:05 AM »
















tim

northmn

  • Guest
Re: David Rose II
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2008, 02:36:13 PM »
Fascinating rifle.  I cannot say one thing about its history but appreciate the posting as this forum is my educational channel.
Is the trigger a set trigger where on pushes the fron forward to set it?

DP

Offline Tom Currie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1215
Re: David Rose II
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2008, 05:25:22 PM »
Well that is unique for sure. That trigger alone is something I haven't seen before. Can't wait till somebody takes a guess at where it was made. Probabaly 1830 ish somewhere.

Thanks for posting it.

Offline Dan'l 1946

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 569
Re: David Rose II
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2008, 12:49:07 AM »
  I've seen a few similar rifles that were made in northern New England, mostly Vermont. I wonder if rocking the trigger forward releases the barrels and lets them rotate for a follow up shot? My newly made swivel breech has a small release lever inside the trigger guard so that I don't have to drop the rifle from my shoulder to rotate the barrels. Works very well.

Offline Ken G

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5048
  • F & AM #758
Re: David Rose II
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2008, 02:06:36 AM »
Tim,
What a unique rifle!   Thanks for posting the pictures.  The trigger is really something special for sure. 
Ken
tnken@windstream.net
Failure only comes when you stop trying.

flintman-tx

  • Guest
Re: David Rose II
« Reply #5 on: July 27, 2008, 05:14:25 AM »
Thanks for showing it to us..very distinctive.

ironwolf

  • Guest
Re: David Rose II
« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2008, 11:48:22 AM »
  I think rocking the tricker frontwards sets the rear tricker for firring ???

  Kev

timM

  • Guest
Re: David Rose II
« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2008, 06:13:37 PM »
This swivel does have a unique trigger mechanism. This trigger works the same as in my last post "Ohio I & II"  When the trigger is in the fired position it is to the rear. The center position allows the hammer to cock. With the hammer cocked you have the option of rocking the trigger forward till it clicks, then it rebounds to the center position at that point you have a "hair" trigger.

In Donald Hutslar work "Gunsmiths of Ohio" he shows David Rose in Liverpool Ohio in 1853, then in Rawsonville Ohio in 1859 and finally Grafton Station Ohio in 1860.

Ned Roberts book "The Caplock Rifle" lends me to believe that percussion doubles were popular in the post Civil War period. I think that this swivel is probably a later build than the rifle in my previous post "Ohio I   & II"  and it is marked Grafton Station.

Over the years I have seen a lot of percussion double rifles (not swivels) that were New England products. Just the ticket for black bears?

Thanks tim

Offline JTR

  • member 2
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3228
Re: David Rose II
« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2008, 06:30:06 PM »
That's a cool gun, Tim!
Thanks for posting it, and all the others. You have quite the collection!
When I get my red car back on the road, maybe Dick and I can make a sprint up your way.
John
John Robbins