Author Topic: Bear pistol  (Read 2405 times)

Offline gibster

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Re: Bear pistol
« Reply #25 on: October 10, 2019, 12:31:47 AM »
Just speculating. Maybe there was a lanyard through it to some type of cap/nipple protector so that the pistol could be carried with a cap on the nipple when going through the woods to help prevent an accidental discharge. Once the hammer was pulled back, it was pulled off and the pistol fired. The lanyard kept them from loosing the protector. It would be quicker than trying to cap it after catching up to the dogs. Would be dangerous running through brush after the dogs with a pistol with a cap on the nipple. Brush snags the hammer and kaboom.

Offline chilehead

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Re: Bear pistol
« Reply #26 on: October 11, 2019, 06:54:24 AM »
...when the dogs treed the coon he would shoot the coon out of the tree trying not to kill it while holding the dogs back. If successful the coon would hit the ground running, he would then turn the dogs loose and have another chace.

What an appalling and nauseating story.

Offline Bob Roller

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Re: Bear pistol
« Reply #27 on: October 11, 2019, 03:12:05 PM »
Probably a gun used to blow your own brains out with instead of being eaten alive
by an injured bear. If a man used a rifle on inadequate caliber and power to put a
bear down with one shot then why would he consider a pistol?
These are good looking handguns and I recently furnished a semi finished double set
trigger to a man that's making one. Also saw some superb European pistols in 1980
at the ML International Shoot in Quantico Va.that had double set triggers made by watch makers
with more parts than some of their watches. I think the weight of a shadow on the front
trigger would fire the gun ;D

Bob Roller

Online Bob McBride

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Re: Bear pistol
« Reply #28 on: October 11, 2019, 05:05:33 PM »
...when the dogs treed the coon he would shoot the coon out of the tree trying not to kill it while holding the dogs back. If successful the coon would hit the ground running, he would then turn the dogs loose and have another chace.

What an appalling and nauseating story.

 At the risk of being so crass as to ‘virtue signal’, may I just say barking a coon out of a tree instead of simply shooting it also gives the coon a chance of finding a tree with a hole in it, or a den, and surviving, instead of just dying. So, that’s gotta be a good thing, yea?
« Last Edit: October 11, 2019, 08:31:04 PM by Bob McBride »
-Bob

My Highland ancestors were sentenced to ‘Transportation’ in lieu of death by King George after the Battle of Culloden. Serving time in Dixie since 1746.

Offline Hungry Horse

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Re: Bear pistol
« Reply #29 on: October 11, 2019, 09:08:58 PM »
Another scenario that hasn’t been mentioned here as to the reason for hunting bear with a pistol, is the hunting of bears in their dens in the early spring. This was quite common, and a long gun wasn’t convenient in the close quarters of a bears den.

  Hungry Horse

Offline bama

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Re: Bear pistol
« Reply #30 on: October 12, 2019, 12:31:35 AM »
Chilehead - Sorry you are offended, that was not my intention. I was merely stating a fact that is part of the sport of hunting here in the South. We live a tough and hard life here in the South and we also play hard. To us the chase  more important than the kill, if you kill all of the critters you have very few chases. Many people have admired a good Coon Hound and many a good men have listened to and hunted behind them. There have even been many of our past Presidents that have had their turn behind a pack of good hounds.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2019, 02:13:23 AM by Dennis Glazener »
Jim Parker

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Online Bob McBride

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Re: Bear pistol
« Reply #31 on: October 12, 2019, 01:50:04 AM »
When he said “trying not to kill it” he didn’t mean wound it. He meant knocking it out of the tree. Making it jump out. Barking it. The chase won’t be back on if it’s dragging a leg. Good grief.
-Bob

My Highland ancestors were sentenced to ‘Transportation’ in lieu of death by King George after the Battle of Culloden. Serving time in Dixie since 1746.

Offline okawbow

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Re: Bear pistol
« Reply #32 on: October 12, 2019, 01:56:44 AM »
When he said “trying not to kill it” he didn’t mean wound it. He meant knocking it out of the tree. Making it jump out. Barking it. The chase won’t be back on if it’s dragging a leg. Good grief.

Absolutely right!
We would try and hit the branch the coon was on, and if that didn’t work, someone would climb the tree and shake him out for another run.
As in life; it’s the journey, not the destination. How you get there matters most.

Online WESTbury

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Re: Bear pistol
« Reply #33 on: October 12, 2019, 02:38:08 AM »
I believe that Davy Crockett could "grin" coons down from a tree.  ;D
"We are not about to send American Boys 9 to 10 thousand miles away from home to do what Asian Boys ought to be doing for themselves."
      Lyndon B. Johnson Oct 21, 1964

Offline chilehead

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Re: Bear pistol
« Reply #34 on: October 12, 2019, 06:20:27 AM »
When he said “trying not to kill it” he didn’t mean wound it. He meant knocking it out of the tree. Making it jump out. Barking it. The chase won’t be back on if it’s dragging a leg. Good grief.

Good grief, indeed.