Author Topic: Mystery Gun picture heavy  (Read 1526 times)

Offline OLUT

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Re: Mystery Gun picture heavy
« Reply #25 on: January 27, 2019, 07:04:43 PM »
Richard- Pics are from a file I have, part of a "future plans" file
Mike- Swedish, Norwegen or Russian is my understanding
I love the fact that everything is on the outside of the lockplate and the mainspring is also the frizzen spring.
Kevin






Folks, this is a bit far from a typical ALR gun, but .....Years ago I was Director of European Manufacturing for a chemical company and spent considerable time in Soderhamn, Sweden where they once had a royal musket factory. Here's a photo from a booklet on manufacturing, with a spitting image photo of your old Swedish gun lock


Offline Mike Brooks

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Re: Mystery Gun picture heavy
« Reply #26 on: January 27, 2019, 07:36:05 PM »
I have seen a couple of these old Swedish guns come out of Wisconsin. Probably brought over by immigrants. The ones I saw in person had the RR channel drilled full length, completely enclosed in the wood from the muzzle back.
NEW WEBSITE! www.mikebrooksflintlocks.com
Say, any of you boys smithies? Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?

Offline Rambling Historian

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Re: Mystery Gun picture heavy
« Reply #27 on: January 28, 2019, 07:47:49 PM »
In terms of the I.J. Behr marking. Johann Jakob Behr was active around 1690-1740 in Maastricht.
"Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence. -John Adams

*All opinions expressed are mine alone and are not meant to represent any other entity unless otherwise clearly stated.*

Offline Rambling Historian

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Re: Mystery Gun picture heavy
« Reply #28 on: January 29, 2019, 05:40:15 PM »
I'll go with the theory of a repurposed pistol barrel and an 1800's restock of a bunch of old misc. parts. Why you would want a shouldered mounted gun that short I couldn't say.

Mounted use I would assume would be logical reason. The Austrians used flintlock carbines with just over 13 inch barrels for their cavalry.
"Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence. -John Adams

*All opinions expressed are mine alone and are not meant to represent any other entity unless otherwise clearly stated.*

Offline Metalshaper

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Re: Mystery Gun picture heavy
« Reply #29 on: February 01, 2019, 05:47:42 PM »
In the Old 'Guns" magazine I once read an article about the Bavarian "Spirit Guns" large bore, short barreled, flint and percussion guns they kept and fired at
celebrations and especially New Years! they were used to make a loud noise to scare the bad 'spirits' away? the article mentioned at the New Years celebration,
 all the guns in the villages were fired at midnight and the game was to see if you could out power the sounds of  the other villages..  ;D

Not saying this is what this gun is, but in my memories of that article ( wish I had kept it ) this gun looks a lot like what was shown.. Some were plain/simple and of course others
were fancied up from front to back?

anyways,
Respect Always
Metalshaper/Jonathan

Offline Pukka Bundook

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Re: Mystery Gun picture heavy
« Reply #30 on: February 01, 2019, 06:09:40 PM »
Kevin,

Tank you for the additional photos.   Very different and though primitive, these guns have a strong appeal to me!

Offline Niall

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Re: Mystery Gun picture heavy
« Reply #31 on: February 01, 2019, 09:41:58 PM »
I'll go with the theory of a repurposed pistol barrel and an 1800's restock of a bunch of old misc. parts. Why you would want a shouldered mounted gun that short I couldn't say.

Mounted use I would assume would be logical reason. The Austrians used flintlock carbines with just over 13 inch barrels for their cavalry.





RH....Just for accuracy,the short carbine you illustrate was originally an Austrian 1851 Kavalleriekarabiner with the Agustin tube lock.The one above has been converted to flintlock in Liege and sold on the commercial market.A bit of retrospection,I suppose.Quite a few of them were converted to percussion and shipped to the US to serve in the Civil War

Offline Rambling Historian

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Re: Mystery Gun picture heavy
« Reply #32 on: February 01, 2019, 10:23:28 PM »
Fair point! I goofed on not correcting that.  :o I was thinking of flintlocks since it has a flintlock on it in the photo. I've seen a few of those believed to have been used in the Civil War. They certainly seem like they'd be useful on horseback.
"Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence. -John Adams

*All opinions expressed are mine alone and are not meant to represent any other entity unless otherwise clearly stated.*