Author Topic: Bone Handle Knife  (Read 1106 times)

Offline WH1

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Bone Handle Knife
« on: February 10, 2019, 07:52:26 AM »
Finished this evening. Forged 1084 carbon steel. the knife is 15 inches overall length. The blade is 9 13/16" long x 1/4" thick x 1 5/16" wide, 7" false edge, 3/16" thick file worked iron guard, 5/8" iron bolster, and a 5" handle from a deer leg bone with an 1/8" brass pin. Trying to decide if I should boil the handle in black tea to stain it or just leave it in the white?
V/R
Todd
















Offline Old Salt

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Re: Bone Handle Knife
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2019, 08:06:08 AM »
If it where mine I would leave it in the white and handle it to give it a natural patina.
just my personal preference.

Old Salt
All gave some Some gave all

Offline Bull Shannon

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Re: Bone Handle Knife
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2019, 09:20:41 AM »
I agree with the salty one, leave it to age naturally.

Offline alyce-james

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Re: Bone Handle Knife
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2019, 06:04:57 PM »
Sir; my vote is with "Old Salt". White and the handle will age nicely. Have a great day.  "O", nice knife, well done. AJ.
Turkeyfooter

Offline James Rogers

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Re: Bone Handle Knife
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2019, 06:30:20 PM »
This is the most appealing knife I've seen with that style of handle in 25 years. The one of old was by Jim Hash who was also top shelf.

Offline g.pennell

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Re: Bone Handle Knife
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2019, 07:20:50 PM »
I really like this one, and agree with the others about just letting the  bone age on its own.  Beautiful work!

Greg
“Let your gun therefore be the constant companion of your walks” Thomas Jefferson

Offline msellers

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Re: Bone Handle Knife
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2019, 07:24:28 PM »
I must admit, that I really like this knife and handle. It looks like it will actually be a usable fit in ones hand.
Mike

Offline MuskratMike

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Re: Bone Handle Knife
« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2019, 08:13:31 PM »
Any chance it is for sale?
"Muskrat" Mike McGuire
Keep your eyes on the skyline, your flint sharp and powder dry.

Offline Hungry Horse

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Re: Bone Handle Knife
« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2019, 08:36:20 PM »
Years ago I hafted an antique carving knife blade that had a broken grip, with a deer leg bone. It turned out very similar to yours, although mine has a brass ferrule instead of iron. It has aged beautifully, and is my favorite carving knife. The bone is slick when it gets grease on it from a big roasted turkey, or shoulder roast, and is a little small in diameter for an optimum grip. Very nice work.

 Hungry Horse

Offline WH1

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Re: Bone Handle Knife
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2019, 06:24:06 AM »
Any chance it is for sale?
Mike
I think this one is already sold but I can make another one very similar.  This evening I forged a 7 1/2" blade similar profile.  it can be finished the same way.

Offline Elnathan

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Re: Bone Handle Knife
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2019, 01:55:06 AM »
I made a bracer to protect my arm when shooting a bow out of a bleached dogbone, and ended up melting beeswax onto it to finish it. the rubbed-in wax gave the very white horn a more mellow color without any added dye.
A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying...cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects. -Robert A. Heinlein

Offline Huntschool

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Re: Bone Handle Knife
« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2019, 08:03:58 AM »
Many years ago I made a push dagger out of plain stock (dont know exactly what the steel was) and used the same leg bone.  The butt end fits into your palm just perfect.  I made a long tail,  filed down a brass plate for a bolster and silver soldered it in place on the blade and then drilled a hole in the bone and epoxied it in place.  40 some years later it is still there and works.  The patina is from hand use. Yea I should have pinned it but I was really young and stupid.......  go figure.

I'll try and get  pic up;







Yea, I know......  The point is not pointy enough.......

« Last Edit: February 12, 2019, 08:20:15 AM by Huntschool »
Bruce A. Hering
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Shotgun Team Coach
Southeastern Illinois College
AMM 761
CLA

Offline P.W.Berkuta

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Re: Bone Handle Knife
« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2019, 09:51:43 PM »
Nice knife all around -- if you have a spare bone then I would stain it to see how it would look then decide if you want to stain this one. Yes the handle looks good as is but it just might look even better stained - you never going to know if you don't do some experimenting  ;).
"The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person who is doing it." - Chinese proverb

Offline WH1

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Re: Bone Handle Knife
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2019, 10:32:38 PM »
Bruce I like the look of that push dagger very clean.

I have decided to leave the handle unstained and let it age naturally through time and use.  However I am working on another knife, same profile but a 7 1/2" blade with a 5" false edge and may tea stain that handle.  I have some scraps I can test with before committing.  Thank you all for your input, one of the reasons I really like this forum and its membership.
V/R
Todd

Offline Elnathan

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Re: Bone Handle Knife
« Reply #14 on: February 13, 2019, 01:23:17 AM »
If you do the tea stain, check it often at short intervals. I tried it once and ended up, very quickly, with something that looked like it came out of the La Brea Tar Pits. I ended up sanding it away (and the color was ON the bone, not in it, despite having added vinegar as a mordant) and went with the bees wax finish I mentioned earlier.
A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying...cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects. -Robert A. Heinlein

Offline Huntschool

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Re: Bone Handle Knife
« Reply #15 on: February 13, 2019, 01:45:59 AM »
WH1:

Thanks a bunch.....  I dont do knives any more, leaving it to you guys that can really do it

I really like your knife......
Bruce A. Hering
Program Coordinator/Lead Instructor (retired)
Shotgun Team Coach
Southeastern Illinois College
AMM 761
CLA

Offline aaronc

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Re: Bone Handle Knife
« Reply #16 on: February 13, 2019, 03:10:07 AM »
That has a great look to it to my eye,..really appealing. I like it enough as is that I would hesitate to make any changes to color if it were mine. Very nice work. -Aaron

Offline JohnnyFM

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Re: Bone Handle Knife
« Reply #17 on: February 23, 2019, 10:14:35 AM »
Well done sir.
This knife you have created represents what I had wanted when I ordered a custom from a well-known reputable pro some years ago. It was everything I specified except the bone handle resembled the size and shape of a baby brontosaurus tibia. That ugly absurd handle made that beautiful blade look like a movie prop from “10,000 BC”.  Raquel Welch she was not. Not exactly fitting for my image of a colonial  rifleman, But if I ever want to portray Fred Flintstone it would be perfect.
And that dinosaur bone handle made the blade awkward and clumsy.  The shame of it is that knife will never cut meat or be used in any way that a knife should. It languishes, buried in a drawer somewhere.

That experience swore me off ordering custom “primitive “ knives.  Now I only buy knives that I can pick up and hold before I lay my hard earned money down. IMO, the handle shape and feel is just as important as the blade

Once again your beauty succeeds where mine fails. Kudos.