Lock inletting

<< < (2/7) > >>

bob in the woods:
Inlet the plate all the way. If it is sinking too much into the wood, I plane down the lock panel, but that usually doesn't happen much any more, cause I eye ball it better than I used to. I also make sure that the lock panel is square to the barrel before I inlet the plate...makes it easier.

J Shingler:
Inlet the plate fully or you are going to go back and reinlet every part .030 deeper after you think you are finished. You will have the outside lock panel all shaped and then realize you forgot to final inlet that plate. Go back and curse yourself for not doing it right the first time. Reinlet all the parts again and then sand the lock panel wood down to final depth and watch that lock panel grow! All your hard work was for nothing as now you have to cut the lock panels again.  Ask how I know ..... :-[

tbailey:
GREAT INFORMATION ON LOCK INTLETING, I HAVE SOME TROUBLE DOING IT ALSO. I WILL HAVE GAPS AROUND THE LOCK,  ONE THING I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW,  DOSE EVERYONE ALWAYS FILE A DRAFT ON THE LOCK.

Acer Saccharum:


I do as Taylor does. Inlet the lock right down to the barrel. You can file the bolster a little to get a perfect fit, or file the barrel flat a little. A tight fit between barrel and lock keeps water from entering the lock cavity. A little dab of grease on the lock bolster before final assembly seals the joint.

Once the lockplate is down in place, mark the holes for the bridle through the lockplate with a pencil or a tight fitting drill. Then pull the lockplate and locate the bridle over your marked hole locations, trace the outside of it with a pencil. Drill holes in the wood within the borders of the bridle, but just shy of full depth. put a depth stop on the drill bit, or wrap the bit with a piece of masking tape as a depth gage. Then chip out the cavity and start fitting the bridle completely, screwheads and all.

Jim Filipski:
Quote from: tbailey on July 29, 2008, 09:41:48 AM

GREAT INFORMATION ON LOCK INTLETING, I HAVE SOME TROUBLE DOING IT ALSO. I WILL HAVE GAPS AROUND THE LOCK,  ONE THING I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW,  DOSE EVERYONE ALWAYS FILE A DRAFT ON THE LOCK.


Tbailey,
Are you referring to a slight draft filed on the bolster ( to throw the tail of the lock out). I have only done this a few times when I had used straight sided oct.barrels. Also on two of my Northampton guns ( with swamps) to get the wider wrist width usually seen on that type of rifle. Other then that I won't because the swamp barrel has the angle already.

But I do lay the lock plate on it's bolster (after it is stripped of the guts) on a large machinist parallel and eye ball it to make sure it is parallel to the plate itself.
More often then not ( especially recently on a number of different brands of locks I have noticed this) the bolster needs some filing because it may cause the lock plate to pitch backward (at the tail ) or inward or outward (at the bottom)This is an important thing to do before inleting a lock plate
If your lock panel is parallel with your side barrel flat it makes life easy to inlet the plate square to the barrel flat
Jim

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page