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General discussion => Gun Building => Topic started by: Mikecooper on July 25, 2018, 04:43:52 AM

Title: Lehigh style triggers
Post by: Mikecooper on July 25, 2018, 04:43:52 AM
Would a double set trigger be appropriate for a Lehigh style or would those more likely have a single trigger?    I spent some time getting this set trigger adjusted so it works properly but kind of like the idea of a simple single trigger.  When did double set triggers come into use?

(https://image.ibb.co/mgdkuT/lehighsettriggers.jpg) (https://ibb.co/iE1S8o)
Title: Re: Lehigh style triggers
Post by: Eric Kettenburg on July 25, 2018, 04:55:34 AM
You'll find most 'classic' Lehigh guns using a simple single trigger.  Not all but most by a large proportion, and the majority are a simple rearward arced/curved trigger as opposed to something utilizing a scroll aka a Bucks trigger etc.  Just look at the original rifles.
Title: Re: Lehigh style triggers
Post by: Mikecooper on July 25, 2018, 01:44:14 PM
Thanks Eric,   I had a hard time getting this set trigger to work.  The original builder didn't have it adjusted right.  It works now but a single trigger may be better.  I already converted it from percussion to flint and replaced the micrometer adjustable modern sights.  Trying to get it back to something more historically accurate for the time. 
Title: Re: Lehigh style triggers
Post by: Nate McKenzie on July 25, 2018, 04:08:12 PM
While you're working on the trigger, it would look a lot better if you would inlet the trigger guard further.
Title: Re: Lehigh style triggers
Post by: Hungry Horse on July 25, 2018, 06:21:01 PM
I own a Lehigh made on or before 1815 ( thatís when the barrel maker quit making barrels) itís flint, converted to percussion. It has a hand forged brass trigger, with a slightly curled trigger, and a fancy scalloped trigger support. It is unsigned, but research leads me to believe it was made by a smith named  Baer. Hope this helps.

  Hungry Horse
Title: Re: Lehigh style triggers
Post by: Bob Roller on July 25, 2018, 07:28:07 PM
Correct me if I'm off base but I think set triggers were used on cross bows.
Some of these set triggers that came along later were made by watch makers who
took great delight in small,complex mechanisms. The ones found on American guns
were basic simple mechanisms that is easy to make even without power tools if
need be. I have raised the question as to why they show up on guns that were shot with
undersize,easy loading round balls on guns with almost no sights that did not allow
precise shooting.Anyone have any ideas about this?

Bob Roller
Title: Re: Lehigh style triggers
Post by: Eric Kettenburg on July 25, 2018, 07:56:01 PM
I own a Lehigh made on or before 1815 ( thatís when the barrel maker quit making barrels) itís flint, converted to percussion. It has a hand forged brass trigger, with a slightly curled trigger, and a fancy scalloped trigger support. It is unsigned, but research leads me to believe it was made by a smith named  Baer. Hope this helps.

  Hungry Horse

Post some pics if you can.  I'd be interested to see it.  I've seen a piece or two signed by a J Baer, if I recall correctly, but I believe he was working somewhere in eastern Berks as they were more along the lines of that style.  Also - a brass trigger?  Unless a brass trigger pad was brazed or otherwise attached to an iron blade, I can't see how an all-brass trigger would have lasted very long at all without excessive wear.  Very curious.
Title: Re: Lehigh style triggers
Post by: JTR on July 25, 2018, 08:52:26 PM
Anyone have any ideas about this?
Bob Roller

Bob, Precise, as to what? A crossbow? A modern target rifle? I have a high precision pellet rifle that will shoot one hole groups all day long at 10 meters. Makes a difference as to what you're comparing them to.

Get a copy of Dillins old book and read the chapter on accuracy, using original rifles.

John
Title: Re: Lehigh style triggers
Post by: Mikecooper on July 26, 2018, 01:10:05 AM
While you're working on the trigger, it would look a lot better if you would inlet the trigger guard further.



Took the trigger guard off to get to the trigger,  just had it laying up there in place.  Actually even when it was pinned on it still was not inlayed good.  Original builder did good on carving and engraving but failed in some ways. 
Title: Re: Lehigh style triggers
Post by: Mikecooper on July 26, 2018, 01:15:03 AM
Post other Lehigh pics if yall want to. 

    With this set trigger I could not cock the lock all the way back without first setting the rear trigger.  After working on it some I can now cock it all the way back with the trigger unset.  It's still a little tight though so I may tweak it some more or may replace it with a single trigger.   Leaning more to the single trigger,  It doesn't take much to set off this small Siler lock anyway. 
Title: Re: Lehigh style triggers
Post by: Bob Roller on July 26, 2018, 01:22:03 AM
Anyone have any ideas about this?
Bob Roller

Bob, Precise, as to what? A crossbow? A modern target rifle? I have a high precision pellet rifle that will shoot one hole groups all day long at 10 meters. Makes a difference as to what you're comparing them to.

Get a copy of Dillins old book and read the chapter on accuracy, using original rifles.

John

I suppose "minute of attacker" would have been the standard back in the "day"
Dillin's book is one I never had but did and do have Ned Roberts "The Muzzle Loading Caplock Rifle".
I have owned several nice oldies with good bores and got fairly good accuracy but nothing like I
got later with Bill Large's barrels.

Bob Roller