Author Topic: Gun Stock Checkering Question  (Read 11734 times)

newknapper

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Gun Stock Checkering Question
« on: February 23, 2011, 05:39:31 PM »
Hello everyone I am new to this forum but have been lurking for quite sometime learning as much as I can from older post and such. I am looking to build a kit gun soon either from Jim Chambers or TVM and I have been looking at other guns trying to get ideas on how to add a little something extra to it. The one quesion I have is how does one go about checkering like on a fortner gun or others like it? What was used to carve the lines in the wood?
« Last Edit: February 23, 2011, 06:31:27 PM by newknapper »

Offline Dr. Tim-Boone

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Re: Gun Stock Checkering Question
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2011, 07:19:06 PM »

You can get a book and the tools you need right here... I think they are the best on the market.  Very helpful as well.

http://www.dembartco.com/products1.htm

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Offline Tim Crosby

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Re: Gun Stock Checkering Question
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2011, 07:35:13 PM »

Offline whitebear

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Re: Gun Stock Checkering Question
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2011, 08:38:39 PM »
I believe that most of the checkering on longrifles was done as what we now refer to as skip line checkering rather than the close sharp pointed diamond checkering that we use on modern guns.
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Online JTR

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Re: Gun Stock Checkering Question
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2011, 10:57:25 PM »
The link that Tim Crosby included is an excellent example of Fordney/Lancaster wrist checkering! This is a great checkering style whether you use the nails or not.

You could also cut the lines with a 30 degree V tool, although the Dembart ttype tool would probably be easier to keep the lines straight. Most of the originals that I've seen have the lines cut fairly sharply, like maybe they were cut with a knife blade.
Just remember that you are not trying to make sharp pointed diamonds like in modern checkering, like whitebear pointed out. And remember that the initial layout is about 75% of making it look right!

John
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38_Cal

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Re: Gun Stock Checkering Question
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2011, 11:07:02 PM »
Let me add onto this one, the flat top checkering is usually done with a flat bottom tool rather than a V-tool, from what I've been able to examine over the years.  You can get riffler files that edge cut to a flat form to use after laying out your pattern and cutting it to 50% of the final depth, so the finished product looks right.  If you lay out your pattern with a 60 degree V cutter, the line will be narrower and will clean up with the flat riffler much easier.  A Grobet brand #31-921 die sinkers riffler file is a good choice here.  They are expensive, but can often be found on EvilBay at less than retail price.

David

newknapper

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Re: Gun Stock Checkering Question
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2011, 12:28:27 AM »
Thanks for replies and the link guys. The dembart tool looks to be the easiest, the gun in the link looks awsome. I will have to figure out which dembart tools I will need before I start.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2011, 12:35:59 AM by newknapper »

Offline Dr. Tim-Boone

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Re: Gun Stock Checkering Question
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2011, 12:42:06 AM »
Besure to think Skipline checkering on a flintlock.. They have the tools for that.
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Offline Captchee

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Re: Gun Stock Checkering Question
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2011, 04:21:00 AM »
 Yes the skip line , also known as French checkering looks cool . But understand that  modern tools produce  modern  western type  sharp checkering . Not the early English and French flat checkering so make sure you understand what your buying
Also the spacing is different . Your looking at 8-12 . Not  what today we consider as being large , IE 16-18  count   

Offline Dphariss

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Re: Gun Stock Checkering Question
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2011, 05:08:38 AM »

Make the spacing cutter to fit a standard checkering tool handle

One side cuts the other runs in the previous line.




Lay  and cut the outside lines.
Lay out the first lines CAREFULLY and check the that the diamonds are shaped as you want. Double check all this. A thin flexible plastic ruler will help with the line layout as it will wrap around the stock to allow drawing the first line.


I have a single line cutter I use for first lines and cleanup.
Start cutting with the spacer cutter once the first line is laid in. The cut lines are straight sided and square bottomed.



If you want make some square silver pegs for extra decoration. Doing every diamond is more than I feel like doing. The square silver pegs only need be in 3/16-1/4". I cut "teeth" in the edges with a sharp chisel.






Stain and finish




Ignore the feet.

Dan
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Offline KentSmith

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Re: Gun Stock Checkering Question
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2011, 12:49:44 PM »
nice work.  You might contract Larry Luck on this site.  He did a Fortney rifle with very nice checkering and nails with his own process.

Offline smshea

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Re: Gun Stock Checkering Question
« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2011, 04:00:01 PM »
Very Nice!

Offline Tim Crosby

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Re: Gun Stock Checkering Question
« Reply #12 on: February 25, 2011, 04:58:55 PM »
nice work.  You might contract Larry Luck on this site.  He did a Fortney rifle with very nice checkering and nails with his own process.


 That is a link I posted to Larry's tutorial above.

 Tim C.

newknapper

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Re: Gun Stock Checkering Question
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2011, 01:33:28 AM »
Greats info guys. Thanks for sharing.