Author Topic: Wednesday Eye Candy!  (Read 6728 times)

Rasch Chronicles

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Wednesday Eye Candy!
« on: September 07, 2011, 12:13:37 PM »
Alright guys!

Here is a little something that maybe you might want to try your hand at if your bored of building single shots...








Image Credit: Czerny's Intl

If no one has any objections, I'll add an occasional "Eye Candy" post whenever I find something out of the ordinary, spectacular, or just plain out of this world!

I'm not sure who suggested or directed me to the auction houses first, but you have my gratitude for pointing me in that direction. The work I have seen is incredible!

Best regards,
Albert “El Matamoro” Rasch
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
Hunting Merriam’s Turkey: Tips and Technique
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Offline Old Ford2

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Re: Wednesday Eye Candy!
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2011, 02:13:57 PM »
Thank You Albert!
Great idea!
Although at first the idea of "Eye Candy" brought forth a slightly different thought.
But yes beautiful guns like this will do.
That revolving rifle is a masterpiece of metal work, and woodwork as well, but how did they do that type of metalwork in that time era? Amazing!
I would like to see a blow-up picture of that rifle.

Best regards
Old Ford
Never surrender, always take a few with you.
Let the Lord pick the good from the bad!

Rasch Chronicles

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Re: Wednesday Eye Candy!
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2011, 02:31:58 PM »
Old Ford,

I wish I could oblige! Unfortunately the pictures on Czerny's are of modest size, unlike Hermann's.

Here is the picture link for the rifle: http://www.czernysonline.com/images/oggetti/G42214_2a.jpg

I'll tell you what, they must have been far more patient and exponentially more skilled than even the best among us!

Best regards,
Albert “El Matamoro” Rasch
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
Tracking and Trailing Tips!
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dannybb55

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Re: Wednesday Eye Candy!
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2011, 02:49:20 PM »
I met a retired blacksmith from Denmark 20 yrs ago who spent WW 2 making American built truck parts because the NAZIs wouldn't let Detroit parts in. He said he used a forge, a square and lots of files. I remember he told me " I Denmark we were taught to file correctly." If you want to get an idea of what blacksmiths were capable of during a peacefull, strong economy read: Practical Blacksmithing by Richardson. It is a late 19th century book but the tooling drawn and described is pretty basic and traditional. My friend David Stone has many forging instructions that seem to start with:" First get a new file..."  He ran an 18th century shop and turned out Mauser parts, repaired old radios, and even turned out a Panzefaust 60 and a Panzerschreck in the shop when the tourists were not looking. Anything is possible with time and money.

4ster

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Re: Wednesday Eye Candy!
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2011, 05:06:11 PM »
Thanks for posting pictures of this amazing gun!  It took a minute to get my head around the basics of its construction.  The way the frizzen springs are shaped to function in the limited space is really interesting.  I wish there was a picture looking from the barrel towards the stock.  It looks like it could be a "Middle Loader"  ;D , or a Muzzle Loader.  

And as I think about it, it would take some courage to pull the trigger if all cylinders were loaded.  I wonder how many owners sold the piece after serious injury to their left hand while holding the fore stock?
« Last Edit: September 07, 2011, 05:26:33 PM by 4ster »

Rasch Chronicles

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Re: Wednesday Eye Candy!
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2011, 05:31:25 PM »
4ster,

You mean like this?



Always happy to oblige!

Best regards,
Albert “El Matamoro” Rasch
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
Cold Weather Camping Tips!
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Offline alyce-james

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Re: Wednesday Eye Candy!
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2011, 05:34:12 PM »
Each time I view this posting I find something new and very interesting to digest. Thanks Albert for the pictures.-- AL
« Last Edit: September 07, 2011, 05:35:10 PM by alyce-james »
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Offline Dennis Glazener

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Re: Wednesday Eye Candy!
« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2011, 05:49:21 PM »
Quote
If no one has any objections, I'll add an occasional "Eye Candy" post whenever I find something out of the ordinary, spectacular, or just plain out of this world!
While I, like others, enjoy an occasional look at European firearms, I would be more in favor of traditional American Longrifles which is the main focus of our board.
Thanks
Dennis
"I never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy, as cause for withdrawing from a friend" - Thomas Jefferson

Rasch Chronicles

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Re: Wednesday Eye Candy!
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2011, 05:50:39 PM »
Danny,

Same thing my dad told me. He said anything can be made, given enough files.

When I was pretty young, he gave me a block of steel and had me file it square. Trust me, I wore out a file doing it, and I managed to reduce that block by a good third before it met his satisfaction. That's also when I learned to draw file, and how to flatten on a piece of glass. If I recall he had me using valve grinding comound, and what I seem to remember is a greenish can with cloverleafs...

I have to call him and remind him of that, he will be tickled!

Best regards,
Albert “El Matamoro” Rasch
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles
Hunting Fallow Deer
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Rasch Chronicles

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Re: Wednesday Eye Candy!
« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2011, 05:51:34 PM »
No problem Dennis.

Albert

Offline Robby

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Re: Wednesday Eye Candy!
« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2011, 06:59:09 PM »
Dennis, I understand the main thrust of the board, but I think it is refreshing to see these wonderful guns on occasion. Without them, its like going to a family reunion and not be allowed to talk about your Grandparents, geeze! My opinion, for what is or isn't worth, keep posting them Albert!
Robby
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Leatherbelly

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Re: Wednesday Eye Candy!
« Reply #11 on: September 07, 2011, 07:40:58 PM »
Cool gun!~ I'll put this one on my "to do" list once I master the single shot,LOL!!~

Buffalochip

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Re: Wednesday Eye Candy!
« Reply #12 on: September 08, 2011, 06:19:55 PM »
Albert,
If you think back, that can of valve grinding compound opened on both sides--course and fine. I still use it to polish out mildly rusted smoothbores using a bore swab slathered with compound, cleaning rod, and electric drill. Does a very nice job--but this is way off topic.

Rasch Chronicles

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Re: Wednesday Eye Candy!
« Reply #13 on: September 08, 2011, 08:12:24 PM »
Buffalochip,

That's right! I remember that!

Thanks amigo!

Best regards,
Albert “The Afghan” Rasch
The Rasch Outdoor Chronicles™
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Offline Ken Prather

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Re: Wednesday Eye Candy!
« Reply #14 on: September 08, 2011, 09:46:40 PM »
I cannot get my brain around what keeps the barrel and forearm secured to the rest of it... the breech side would be like any winder type gun I am thinking, but the barrel......
Galations 2:20

Offline JTR

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Re: Wednesday Eye Candy!
« Reply #15 on: September 08, 2011, 11:03:33 PM »
Ken,
I'm thinking that the barrel/forearm fastening would be similar to a Colt Percussion pistol or revolving rifle. Probably a wedge in the forearm someplace that goes through the same pin that the cylinder rotates on, which in turn holds the barrel and forearm in place.
Cool pistola, and it would certainly take so doin to make one!
John
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Offline Bob Pearl

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Re: Wednesday Eye Candy!
« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2011, 04:04:58 PM »
Check out Torsten Lenk's, The Flintlock: its origin and development, for the height of European extravagance. I think the study of the American longrifle starts in Europe.