Author Topic: Antique Kentucky Firearms Resources in print and on the Internet  (Read 9353 times)

Offline Hurricane ( of Virginia)

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Antique Kentucky Firearms Resources in print and on the Internet
« on: December 19, 2008, 08:26:04 PM »
Please use these references for your further study:

1. Click here for <Books in Print and Out of Print>


2. New York Gunmakers

Curt Johnson reported this in the Archives: "five volume set of books that Tom Rowe published. The manuscript was written by the late Holman J. Swinney, who was curator of a museum in Rochester. Swinney spent around 50 years compiling information for this monumental work. It is probably the most thorough study of a single region ever done by anyone. It does contain some information on flintlock period rifles.

3. OWR-CSA Newsletter

This non-profit organization of Kentucky rifle colectors, located in Western,PA has been publishing a news letter since 1997, now 12 volumes...approximately 49 editions, each of which presents articles and pictures of Kentucky Rifles and associated subjects. Bill Vance is the publisher.

4. Good Internet Educational Resources for Gunmaker Information

A. The Kentucky Rifle Association: Founded is 1961-62, it remains today the premiere international organization devoted to "the collection and preservation of Kentucky Rifles, Kentucky Pistols and accessories."

              http://www.kentuckyrifleassociation.org/

B.  "American Historical Services" : Mel Hankla publishes a internet site devoted to colonial American history and though there is a commercial element to his site, there are extraordinary profile and pictures of many major gunsmiths and an example of their Kentucky Rifles.

                http://www.americanhistoricservices.com

      
C. The Association of Ohio Longrifle Collectors also regularly publishes newsletter, profiling Ohio makers and these are reproduced on their internet site.

                      http://www.aolrc.org/home.swf

D. The magazine " Muzzleblasts" often publishes articles of significance to Kentucky rifles. Their online site is:

                            http://www.muzzleblasts.com/

5. There were three volumes of "Acouterments" by Jim Johnson, and a second volume (Behold the long Rifle, Again) by Whisker. There are also numerous paper backs by Whisker on early American arms making.

6. North Carolina: Michael Briggs has published at least three large essays on North Carolina rifles.

         Bill Ivey  published a compendium on North Carolina Longrifles gunsmiths  in October, 2010.

                       http://www.northcarolinalongrifles.com

7. North Hampton area of Pennsylvania ( Lehigh, Allentown, Allemengle):Ron Gabel has published several essays on Gunmakers from this area.

8. ALR Archives:  Be sure to search the ALR Archives. Button is on the "splash" (front page). It is a rich source of facts and discussion on many subjects related to Antique Kentucky Rifles., as well as other subjects of interest to collectors and contemporary gunsmiths.

9. Texas   "The Texas Gun Trade, 1780 - 1899", by Chris Hirsch.

10. Tennessee: William Beals Gunsmith

                  http://americanlongrifles.org/forum/index.php?topic=6693.0

11.  Pennsylvania German Folklore Society publications :
                Volume Vll (1942) and Volume lX (1944)
             are report to have extensive treatises on the Kentucky
              Longrifle.

12.   Moravian Gunsmiths

               http://americanlongrifles.org/forum/index.php?topic=11463.0

13. West Virginia Gunmakers, particularly Hampshire CO. 

                http://hampshirecountylongrifles.blogspot.com/
 
« Last Edit: February 22, 2015, 10:25:00 PM by Hurricane ( of Virginia) »

Offline Hurricane ( of Virginia)

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Flayderman's Catalogues
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2008, 09:46:53 PM »
For many years, these regularly published catalogs had within their pages pictures and descriptions of many Kentucky Rifles that were for sale. Most interesting is the price asked then compared to now. It would seem that $250.00 or less would buy one a very fine signed, carved longrifle in 1960 and 1970s. Contarst that to Edith Cooper and Joe Kendig who bought them for less than $5.00. Today's value  priceless"!  :o
« Last Edit: December 20, 2008, 09:49:11 PM by hurricane »