Author Topic: rough bores  (Read 4657 times)

Offline wildthing

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rough bores
« on: February 28, 2017, 12:11:45 AM »
just how badly will a rough bore effect accuracy of a muzzle loader? wildthing

Offline JBJ

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Re: rough bores
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2017, 02:07:59 AM »
How rough is rough? I know I had an original Ohio .32 half stock years ago that was about as rough as the inside of a brick chimney (a bit of an exaggeration) that was poison on squirrels. The lands were very clear but the whole affair was rough inside the bore. Did not tear patches on loading but it took some effort to really get it clean after a session in the woods. But it shot! You will never know until you try it out. Make sure that the rifle is safe to shoot to begin with!
J.B.

Offline wildthing

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Re: rough bores
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2017, 03:43:54 AM »
The rifle is a TC  .50 caliber Hawkin.  It is a nice rifle on the out side but the bore has some nasty looking pitting in several places.  I picked it up at a trade show for a hundred dollars.  I should have checked the bore but I didn't have my light with me, I figured for a hundred bucks I couldn't loose. If it doesn't shoot I can always have it bored to .54.and still not have much invested.  wildthing



Online bob in the woods

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Re: rough bores
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2017, 04:18:58 AM »
If it was used with the substitute powders and not cleaned well, that pitting might be deeper than you think.

Offline Skychief

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Re: rough bores
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2017, 04:38:52 AM »
Only one way to know for sure.  I had a halstocked .36 with a rough bore.  Named it "Lightning" as it never hit the same place twice.

Hope your luck is better, Skychief

Offline Daryl

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Re: rough bores
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2017, 09:19:29 PM »
Only one way to know for sure.  I had a halstocked .36 with a rough bore.  Named it "Lightning" as it never hit the same place twice.

Hope your luck is better, Skychief

LOL!
Daryl

"a gun without hammers is like a spaniel without ears" King George V

Offline oldtravler61

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Re: rough bores
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2017, 11:04:36 PM »
  Wildthing just a thought. But sometime ago I acquired three barrels that I thought I wasted money on. Because of all the rust inside an out. A tip from KY-flinter about soaking them in Evapor-rust was the trick. They came out looking like New. Might give it a try you got nothing to lose....Oldtravler

Offline wildthing

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Re: rough bores
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2017, 11:36:38 PM »
Thanks for the replys  I PLAN TO DO SOME SH






Thanks for the replys .  I plan on casting some ball this week then trying it out on the weekend. Will bring extra patches for wiping between shots,maybe that will help.  wildthing












Offline Daryl

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Re: rough bores
« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2017, 02:43:07 AM »
If you can round up a mould casting bullets (R.E.A.L. for example) that you can run some 320 grit into the grease grooves with BP Lube, you can, with the help of a steel rod for loading, effectively  fire-lap the bore, to smooth it up some.  It is amazing what 30 to 50 shots will do for your gun's rough bore.
Wade's caution about possibly REALLY deep pits could be a reality if Pyrodex or other perchlorate powder was used.
Daryl

"a gun without hammers is like a spaniel without ears" King George V

Offline Hungry Horse

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Re: rough bores
« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2017, 05:43:57 AM »
The fire lapping works, but I would give it a dose of Evaporust first. Then put a little lapping compound on a piece of steel plate, put a conical bullet of the proper size on the plate, and with another piece of good flat steel roll the bullet back and forth until the abrasive is inbeded in the bullet. Now, load a good stiff load, and fire the bullet. You will have to repeat this several times, and you should mop the bore between shots. You will feel the bore getting smoother, but don't go too far, a T/C doesn't have very deep rifling to start with.

  Hungry Horse

Offline wildthing

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Re: rough bores
« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2017, 03:34:07 PM »
Thanks for the tips.  wildthing

Offline Dphariss

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Re: rough bores
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2017, 11:53:49 PM »
The rifle is a TC  .50 caliber Hawkin.  It is a nice rifle on the out side but the bore has some nasty looking pitting in several places.  I picked it up at a trade show for a hundred dollars.  I should have checked the bore but I didn't have my light with me, I figured for a hundred bucks I couldn't loose. If it doesn't shoot I can always have it bored to .54.and still not have much invested.  wildthing
Junk. Unless recut to larger bore size and then the really deep dovetails might be an issue. Possibly dangerous. Its surely the result of chorate fouling and could this actually EAT into the barrel far enough to vent gas. Its very difficult to get a barrel pitted like this clean.
Any used TC  or other modern percussion ML (and maybe flints too) likely has a trashed barrel due to the widespread availability of a corrosive "replica" powder.

Dan
He who dares not offend cannot be honest. Thomas Paine

Offline Daryl

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Re: rough bores
« Reply #12 on: March 09, 2017, 12:10:57 AM »
Another option is www.trackofthewolf.com for a replacement barrel, if they still have those.
Daryl

"a gun without hammers is like a spaniel without ears" King George V

Offline little joe

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Re: rough bores
« Reply #13 on: March 09, 2017, 06:18:52 PM »
I have a 50 cal with a very bad pitting. It still shoots good but requires wiping every few shots 3-6 depending on the humidity.

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Re: rough bores
« Reply #14 on: March 20, 2017, 03:10:38 PM »
How rough is rough? I know I had an original Ohio .32 half stock years ago that was about as rough as the inside of a brick chimney (a bit of an exaggeration) that was poison on squirrels. The lands were very clear but the whole affair was rough inside the bore. Did not tear patches on loading but it took some effort to really get it clean after a session in the woods. But it shot! You will never know until you try it out. Make sure that the rifle is safe to shoot to begin with!
J.B.

This is encouraging as I am currently resurrecting a .32 with a rough bore.  I hope that the time I am investing in the whole reworking process is worth it but I will not know for sure until I shoot the rifle.

Offline TMerkley

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Re: rough bores
« Reply #15 on: March 20, 2017, 11:45:17 PM »
What caliber is it?  How thick are the walls? 

I have cleaned up a few of the old originals enough that they will shoot center but high and go higher as they smooth out.  I cut the depths of the groove deeper and then reamed with Emery cloth wrapped around a metal rod and went slow to medium with the drill.  After cleaning then shoot some minie Balls to knock the burs down or "slug" it which would probably be the best way to get a good measurement after as well

Offline little joe

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Re: rough bores
« Reply #16 on: March 20, 2017, 11:58:39 PM »
Re breeching a old 32 gun now. Owners GG Grampaw owned it and he wants to shoot it.  Rebuilding lock and triggers new B plug and drum and nipple.I think it will shoot pretty good and be  safe.