Author Topic: cleaning and ballistol  (Read 18061 times)

Online hanshi

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cleaning and ballistol
« on: April 21, 2009, 08:39:37 PM »
Cleaning up after shooting has been discussed a lot and I have my own methods, as well.  I've heard a lot of mention of Ballistol in the cleaning regimen.  I was thinking of trying it out but would like to know something about it, first.  Exactly what is it,  how is it used and what does it do compared to, say, other oils & cleaners?
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Offline Eric Fleisher

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2009, 09:09:27 PM »
I have never used it myself yet.  I have friends who do.  Here is a link to the Ballistol web site.  http://www.ballistol.com/

Offline Roger Fisher

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2009, 09:19:24 PM »
Works for me after cleaning and drying the bore as antiruster; but not in the lock innards seems to get 'gummy' a bit.

Scott Semmel

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2009, 11:12:31 PM »
It is water soluble oil of that, I’m told and also believe, is of a higher quality than run of the mill machinist water soluble oils. My belief, mistaken or not, is that if I’m going to clean that long narrow hole in my barrel with water I’m not going to put anything in the barrel that does not dissolve in water. That is why I use it for last step in cleaning. When I played around with the dry patch system of shooting I felt that it out performed regular machinist water-soluble oil but that is not a scientific finding just an impression. Gave up on dry patches, that wipe after every shot thing got old after a bit and skill deficit is more of an issue with my shooting than patch lubes.

Offline ChipK

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2009, 08:45:00 AM »
About ten years ago or so when I first learned about this stuff I called a distributor, I believe out of Colorado, and talked with him about it.  He passed on the story that it was a coal oil product developed in Germany as an all in one lube that would help to preserve metal, oil, wood, and even serve as an antiseptic aid for minor cuts.

Ever since then I have used it on my rifles, clean with it straight for the first time and start counting the patches, you swear you will never get a clean one to come out.  Of course, eventually you do.  I have used it on my leather bags, stocks and all metal surfaces on my rifles and pistols, on my own cuts, and even used it to cure ear mites in my Springer Spaniel and yes it worked super for that.

I love the stuff and although I generally clean with just straight cold water in my rifles now they always get a Ballistol soaked patch run through to protect the bore and a final wipe on the outside.  My bores are clean and protected with the stuff, simply put, it just works.

Online hanshi

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2009, 06:18:33 PM »
ChipK, Sounds a little like an old pine tree oil called "Astyptodyne".  I haven't seen it in many years so don't think it's still being manufactured.  Being from Georgia, originally, and Georgia being the naval stores capital of the world; I remember the reverence accorded it.  It was used, as you mention, for everything from cuts & bruises to wood finishing.  I'd love to find some and try it as a patch lube.  It ought to work plus it smelled like a pine tree. 
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Wyoming Mike

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2009, 06:38:02 PM »
I have been using it to protect the barrels in my muzzleloaders for the last four years.  It is a water soluble mineral oil that smells like a pair of well worn socks left on the radiator.

Using it straight for cleaning won't work anymore than any other oil.  If you mix it with water you get a kind of moose milk that will clean about as well as any other moose milk.  I know some people who use the water-Ballistol mix for a patch lube.

I use TOW's Bore Cleaner mixed 50-50 with water to clean my BP stuff.  It is kind of a super soap that I really don't want to leave in the barrel even after drying so I run a Ballistol-water mix to kill the soap and clean out some residual graphite left in the barrel.  After a couple of dry patches I run a patch sopping with Ballistol to protect the barrel.

I used to use 10 wgt motor oil for barrel protection.  One thing I did notice when I switched to Ballistol is that I can shoot all day without cleaning.  I use a spit patch and some of my rifles needed to be cleaned after five shots or so.  Now I have no problems with it.

BYW Dutch Shultz in his systems recommends soaking shooting patches in Ballistol and water solution and drying the patches to leave them impregnated with Ballistol.  I don't use a greasy patch lube so never have tried it but just passing it along.

Offline Mad Monk

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2009, 07:30:54 PM »
It is a form of mineral oil extracted from coal.  Most likely lignite coal.

E. Ogre

chuck-ia

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2009, 01:39:00 AM »
I bought some a couple years ago, all I heard was good things about it. The only thing I have noticed is after swabbing the bore I have a hard time getting the patches to come out perfectly clean, allways have a light brown color on the patch, I can't imagine it is rust. Pretty much have switched to break free, don't get the brownish patch anymore. I actually kinda like the smell of it. To be honest, I think plain old 10 wt motor oil would work just fine for preventing rust and lubing the lock, or any weight motor oil. Hmmm, I wonder what would happen if a person was to drop the oil and filter in a new f-150 (or similar) and fill it back up with ballistol, or a favorite gun oil? Just kidding. chuck-ia

Daryl

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2009, 01:49:16 AM »
In the day of pure petroleum oils, auto oils were poor at preventing rust. Just have a look at engines at an autowrecker's yard. They will actually rust underneath the oil as it sits on top and doesn't stop moisture from getting between the surfaces.

I don't think I'd use anything with silicone or Teflon.   WD40 works for me as a preservative - has year after year since the early 80's.  ML's stored for up to 8 years with no more protection than the last cleaning with cold water, the drying with patches then WD40 flush and wiped thin inside and out with a patch have not rusted in the least, anywhere.
I haven't tried Balistol, but have some Taylor gave me from a bottle someone gave him.  He tried it as an after-cleaning oil and his rifle rusted in 1 week.  Perhaps the stuff he was given was contaminated - it didn't look like it.  I'll stick with what has worked all these years, I guess.

Offline Jerry V Lape

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2009, 04:06:10 AM »
I tried Ballistol with Dutch's dry patch method and didn't like it as it was too hard loading that way after a couple shots.    However, it does work for me as a cleaner diluted about 5 to one in water. It is satisfactory for short term rust protection undiluted and doesn't seem to hurt stock finish if it gets on it.  I use the 5 to 1 milk as patch lube wet for target shooting so the same stuff works as patch and cleaner. 

Online hanshi

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #11 on: April 23, 2009, 06:25:33 AM »
Thanks for the information, all.  My question is pretty much answered.  I think I'll stick with what I've been using, including WD40, which I really like.
!Jozai Senjo! "always present on the battlefield"
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Offline Dphariss

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #12 on: April 23, 2009, 08:30:55 AM »
I have been using G-96 Gun Treatment and in over 30 years of use in Iowa, SE Asia, Alaska and Montana not once has it given me a reason to cuss it.
Its mostly silcone.
Its not a metal fouling cleaner. But its a great cold weather lube and wonderful rust protectant.
In 1970 WD-40 would not keep a gun from rusting over night indoors in SE Asia.
Or it was removing the blue from a Colt Commander slide, it was red in the AM in any case.
Dan
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Offline JCKelly

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #13 on: April 23, 2009, 04:41:24 PM »
mastgeneralstore.com  sells 2oz bottle of Astypodyne, the original Pine Oil Liniment from 1906 . . . cure everything but a broken heart. . . made from the resinous wood of the Long Leaf Pine

Me, because water kinda rusts my guns and soap appears to guarantee rust, I've done some swabing with rubbing alcohol. For the sole & subtle reason that the bottle was handy on my workbench. Tnen finish with the Magic Gun Oil of choice.

WD-40 is great for the WD guys profits. Wouldn't put it on a machine of mine. Except to help loosen frozen threaded stuff. For which I prefer Kroil anyway. Kroil being more expensive, hard to find & with some really nasty warnings about its effects on heath just gotta be better.

Silicone has the property (virtue = vice) of staying on forever. Get it on the stock, hope you like your stock finish because I think it would be quite a chore to refinish it. Or, on a more positive note, no uneducated fool in the future will ever be able to paint that stock.

Daryl

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #14 on: April 23, 2009, 04:57:27 PM »
Interesting! To oil, or not to oil - that's the question - and of course, what oil to use - snake, fish or fowl? I do know that marmot oil (off the innards) is superb for staying power, hard to get of the hands , very useful as a warm or cold weather patch lube, boot waterproofer, etc, etc.

Online hanshi

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #15 on: April 23, 2009, 07:51:55 PM »
My experience with WD40 as a rust preventative has been mostly negative, as well.  I stopped using it for that purpose long ago.  It does work well for me in the cleaning phase and I normally WD40 the dry bore prior to applying my usual protective oil.  I often use a combination of quality oils on a patch to protect the bore.  Being OCD (according to my wife) I re-oil with a patch the next day and the next and periodically after that.  Unnecessary but comforting.  My fear of rust is exceeded only by my arachnophobia. 

Interestingly, contrary to some other reports, I've found the various bore butters & such left much to be desired.  Tried them a few times and noticed the beginnings of rust within a day or two.  I would think as long as one monitors one's barrels carefully, most any quality oil will suffice.
!Jozai Senjo! "always present on the battlefield"
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William Worth

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #16 on: April 23, 2009, 09:58:13 PM »
Sounds a little like an old pine tree oil called "Astyptodyne".  I haven't seen it in many years so don't think it's still being manufactured.  

There's this outfit:

Astyptodyne Chemical Co.
PO Box 15278
Wilmington, NC

Linda Sistrunk,Contact
910-392-8110

It's marketed as tick repellent.

Online hanshi

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #17 on: April 23, 2009, 10:19:02 PM »
William, many thanks for the info.  Back when the earth's crust was cooling the oil was a staple at our house.  Glad to know it's still available.  Marketed as a tick repellent?  I'd definitely prefer Astyptodyne to Deet as long as it works.
!Jozai Senjo! "always present on the battlefield"
Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.

William Worth

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #18 on: April 23, 2009, 11:49:59 PM »
Get some and let us know how it works, for all of it's many uses. 

Offline bob in the woods

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #19 on: April 24, 2009, 01:53:00 AM »
I have always used WD-40 for rust prevention on my firearms. Use it as a patch lube as well.
Lately, I changed to bear oil, and reallyl ike it. I think the bear oil is superior for anti rust. Doesn't seem to gum up either. If the bears co-operate I'd like to stay with it!

Daryl

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #20 on: April 24, 2009, 02:23:27 AM »
Bob - if you can get some late or mid season woodchucks, strip the fat from the internal organs, not the outside fat and try that. It's got to be close to marmot oil - which surpasses bear's oil - in my humble opinion, that is.  It is surprising how much oil comes from the guts of an adult marmot- the fat being so rich is oil in comparrison to the outside fat, which makes more of a shortening.  I've rubbed raw fat clumps into my boots as a waterproofer - there is nothing that beats in from a comercial  product.  It also makes a great cold weather patch lube, the patches remaining pliable to -20 or so.

Offline Brian

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #21 on: April 24, 2009, 05:19:05 AM »
I’ve used Ballistol and don’t mind it.  Been there with WD-40 as well.  Good stuff, but perhaps over rated.  I use a variety of products to clean with, but what I’ve been using as a “preservative” lately is something called “Fluid Film”  The manufacturer describes it as follows:

A superior lubricant which is also an unparalleled rust & corrosion control system.  Always active, once in place non-evaporating, non-drying, fluid film stays put forming a continuous, durable, protective barrier.  Utilizes the unique molecular action from wool-wax along with other corrosion inhibiting ingredients.  Not water proof, it displaces moisture.  Apply over damp or dry surfaces.  Repels water, resists washout.  Fluid Film penetrates through rust, stopping all metal deterioration on contact. Excellent bonding properties.  Migrates to inaccessible areas by capillary action.  Impregnates pores of exposed metal.  Keeps moisture and oxygen out.  Terminates both natural and industrial atmospheric corrosion.  Eliminates the destructive corrosive effects of harsh chemicals such as salt, acid, calcium chloride, fertilizer, herbicide and pesticide.  Stops steel from rusting, aluminum magnesium & copper from oxidizing, chrome and brass from pitting.”

What can I say.  Probably cures cancer as well.   :D

But it DOES seem to work as a preservative.  Dunno.  This whole "what to use as a preservative" thing is kind of like which is best - Chevy or Ford.

Smells like bubble gum.  Mind, I liked the smell of Ballistol as well.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2009, 05:22:21 AM by Brian Dancey »
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Daryl

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #22 on: April 24, 2009, 05:25:59 PM »
Sounds great, Brian - even better than WD40 - where to get it?????

William Worth

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #23 on: April 24, 2009, 05:46:17 PM »
Marine supply, ag supply, John Deere dealers, etc., have Fluid Film.  Or you can look up their web site.

Daryl

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Re: cleaning and ballistol
« Reply #24 on: April 24, 2009, 06:26:44 PM »
tks