Author Topic: Priming powder and humidity  (Read 3132 times)

Offline Dennis Glazener

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Priming powder and humidity
« on: October 05, 2017, 03:13:29 AM »
Rather than ask on the topic of priming tools etc I will open a new topic. As I mentioned on the other thread I am positive (as you can be for a 74 yr old man) that I read where someone mentioned Null B powder DID NOT attract humidity like Goex 4F. I was going to buy a can for that reason only. Here in central VA it is nothing for us to have 95-98% humidity early in the morning and often in the 90% range later in the day. Often the pan on my rifle does look like its primed with black soap or soup ;D

Using 3F is a little better but I like using a finner priming powder when just target shooting.

Anyone notice any difference in the brands of priming powders as far as attracting moisture?
Dennis
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Offline smylee grouch

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Re: Priming powder and humidity
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2017, 03:36:42 AM »
I wonder if the Mad Monk is the guy you were thinking of as I'm sure I read that too.

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Re: Priming powder and humidity
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2017, 05:18:12 AM »
In NC just west of Charlotte. We have humidity. Real humidity. Until I actually prime I leave a G-U-M Softpick stuck in the touch hole. When removed, disrupts powered and seems to help ignition. Not PC, but it works.  Once primed, change prime every 30 minutes or so when hunting. Have cows knee over the lock and/or tuck under arm if raining. Last two 'misfires' while hunting occurred with caps. Actually more of a cleaning problem (left moisture in breech area). Have both null-b and ffff for priming. See no measurable or observable difference. Currently only using Swiss. Just don't see myself laying on my deathbed saying, 'gee, wished I'd have used a cheaper powder'.

dave

Offline hanshi

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Re: Priming powder and humidity
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2017, 08:24:26 PM »
I've only used Goex & Dupont 4F and Goex 3F for prime.  While the tiny spring primers often get clogged in high humidity, I can say I've never had (even) 4F go bad in the pan unless the gun has been fired.  Fresh first load has always been reliable in the bush even in light rain.
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Offline smylee grouch

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Re: Priming powder and humidity
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2017, 09:39:20 PM »
I've had the same experience, my first pan charge has mostly stayed dry(I use  a pan sealer like bees wax/tallow mix) but if I fire a shot the fowling seems to pic up moisture quite easy. 

Offline Daryl

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Re: Priming powder and humidity
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2017, 10:06:17 PM »
Been times on the trail, not often, but times, when going to prime for my turn and the pan is full of wet black goop. 

This is wiped out with the shirt tail of someone who isn't watching, or a piece of flannelette carried for the purpose. Then prime, step up to the line and fire - no problem.

I suspect the problems arise when hunting small game like squirrels, bunnies or grouse, where multiple shots are fired and one must wipe and re-prime often.
Daryl

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Offline Dobyns

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Re: Priming powder and humidity
« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2017, 05:19:25 PM »
A glazed powder is less affected by moisture than an unglazed powder.  Both Swiss and Goex ffffg are glazed and Swiss gets the nod for quicker ignition.  Null B is slightly quicker than Swiss ffffg, but my question would be whether it was glazed, or just the fines screened out prior to glazing.  Rather than worry about insignificant differences in ignition time, I would just use the Swiss ffffg for hunting.


Offline hanshi

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Re: Priming powder and humidity
« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2017, 07:21:47 PM »
A few years ago at a "vous" I was on the woods walk with my .40 flintlock; the humidity was about as bad as it gets.  After my first shot the pan got soupy.  I wiped it out each time prior to pouring in the prime.  The only FTF was after my flint broke.  Later after the shooting was over I started to clean the rifle.  The fouling was so affected by the high humidity that black sludge dripped out of the muzzle when the barrel was inverted.
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John Ciccone

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Re: Priming powder and humidity
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2017, 01:41:12 AM »
I live in Maryland and practice at Fairfax Rod and Gun. The humidity can get pretty intense. I find after several shots, I need to wipe off my flint. I use Null B as a priming powder and do not have a problem with the powder itself.

Offline Dphariss

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Re: Priming powder and humidity
« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2017, 09:07:01 AM »
A glazed powder is less affected by moisture than an unglazed powder.  Both Swiss and Goex ffffg are glazed and Swiss gets the nod for quicker ignition.  Null B is slightly quicker than Swiss ffffg, but my question would be whether it was glazed, or just the fines screened out prior to glazing.  Rather than worry about insignificant differences in ignition time, I would just use the Swiss ffffg for hunting.
The purity of the Saltpeter has a great deal to do with the powders resistance to humidity. Pure Saltpeter will pickup very little moisture from the air and will return any excess to the air when the humidity level drops.
Swiss is not graphited.
Its simply polished. as the grains dry some Saltpeter migrates to the surface and  makes a shiny shell, or so I have read.
The British Gov't would not buy powder that had "black lead" glazing. It disguised the powder by making it look more polished that it was, it also increases the fouling slightly and it makes the powder flow better when poured. Most cans of Swiss will have a few loose clumps in the can, graphite prevents this.
An old test back in the day was to rub it on the palm. If  black rubbed off it was lower grade powder with "black lead".

Dan
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Offline Dphariss

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Re: Priming powder and humidity
« Reply #10 on: October 20, 2017, 09:12:03 AM »
Rather than ask on the topic of priming tools etc I will open a new topic. As I mentioned on the other thread I am positive (as you can be for a 74 yr old man) that I read where someone mentioned Null B powder DID NOT attract humidity like Goex 4F. I was going to buy a can for that reason only. Here in central VA it is nothing for us to have 95-98% humidity early in the morning and often in the 90% range later in the day. Often the pan on my rifle does look like its primed with black soap or soup ;D

Using 3F is a little better but I like using a finner priming powder when just target shooting.

Anyone notice any difference in the brands of priming powders as far as attracting moisture?
Dennis

I have been told that some years back, after the last Moosic kaboom, that along with the move to LA that Goex had to get a different supplier for saltpeter and it was a better grade and thus attracts much less moisture. I ran out of Swiss Null B and I am now back to using some old GOEX FFFF, but where I live high humidity is rare unless its raining.
Will have to get some more Null B though......

Dan
He who dares not offend cannot be honest. Thomas Paine