Author Topic: Researching History of a Gun  (Read 724 times)

Offline Hudnut

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Researching History of a Gun
« on: September 09, 2018, 01:42:40 AM »
This is the engraved silver thumbpiece on a 16ga. double I recently purchased.  It is converted to percussion from flintlock.  32 1/2" barrels, 15" pull to front trigger.  It was made by Barber & Boaler, who were a partnership 1800-1817; proofmarks are pre-1813.

The mark is a crown over a caboshed stag's head, over a coronet.  Research suggests that the crown over stag's head is the crest of the Legge family of Dartmouth, the coronet is the mark of an earl.
William Legge, Fourth Earl of Dartmouth, was born in 1784, died 1853.  He was a young man when this gun was made.

Antique guns are fascinating; being able to associate a person with the gun makes it even more interesting.



Offline Craig Wilcox

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Re: Researching History of a Gun
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2018, 06:08:50 AM »
Lucky guy!  That is a very beautiful shotgun, and to be able to trace it to a specific person is great.

Thanks for showing it.  Is that going to be your duck hunting gun this winter?  It is almost too beautiful to shoot.
Craig Wilcox
We are all elated when Dame Fortune smiles at us, but remember that she is always closely followed by her daughter, Miss Fortune.

Offline Hudnut

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Re: Researching History of a Gun
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2018, 02:23:25 PM »
The bores are shiny.  When a flashlight is shone down the barrels, light reflects off the faces of the breechplugs.  It was carefully cleaned after every use.  I'd love to know where its been the last 210 years...

The dog on the trigger guard has real character.



Note the low top rib and silver blade front sight - early features.



Offline Steve-In

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Re: Researching History of a Gun
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2018, 08:27:05 PM »
Beautiful shotgun.  I have a Birmingham 18 gauge that has a nicely engraved silver thumb piece .  There are no other identifing marks except for the normal proof stamps.
I have often wondered just who L R was.
Steve Neher