Author Topic: RESTORATIONS OF OLD LONGRIFLES-ADDED OBSERVATION  (Read 689 times)

Offline WESTbury

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RESTORATIONS OF OLD LONGRIFLES-ADDED OBSERVATION
« on: October 28, 2021, 05:45:52 PM »
I try to spend time periodically reading old threads which cover a variety of topics related to longrifles. I found one yesterday from 2009 centered around restorations that newer members of this forum like me may find enlightening.

 https://americanlongrifles.org/forum/index.php?topic=3805.msg36231
« Last Edit: October 31, 2021, 03:51:14 PM by WESTbury »
"We are not about to send American Boys 9 to 10 thousand miles away from home to do what Asian Boys ought to be doing for themselves."
President Lyndon B. Johnson October 21, 1964

Offline WESTbury

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Re: RESTORATIONS OF OLD LONGRIFLES-ADDED OBSERVATION
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2021, 03:49:50 PM »
I think the most interesting statement Wayne Heckert made in the 9th paragraph of his initial statement of the thread is "Most Kentucky Rifles were not artistically carved."

Conversely, 98% percent of the published rifles in all of the books are carved. That would lead newcomers to collecting, or antique rifle students, to believe that artistic carving was the norm.
« Last Edit: October 31, 2021, 04:05:24 PM by WESTbury »
"We are not about to send American Boys 9 to 10 thousand miles away from home to do what Asian Boys ought to be doing for themselves."
President Lyndon B. Johnson October 21, 1964

Offline rich pierce

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Re: RESTORATIONS OF OLD LONGRIFLES-ADDED OBSERVATION
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2021, 04:37:39 PM »
I think the most interesting statement Wayne Heckert made in the 9th paragraph of his initial statement of the thread is "Most Kentucky Rifles were not artistically carved."

Conversely, 98% percent of the published rifles in all of the books are carved. That would lead newcomers to collecting, or antique rifle students, to believe that artistic carving was the norm.

I think his statement could be close to accurate IF we don’t stretch it to mean that was the case during all timeframes. Carving was “out” during the percussion era and there were probably 5 times as many “Kentucky rifles” made from 1830-1880 as were made in the 50 years encompassing 1750-1800.

I don’t agree that 98% of published longrifles are carved unless one only has books on early and Golden Age longrifles.

Here is a plain plain plain Lancaster smooth rifle. There’s a big knot in the comb. No curl. Tang is nicely carved. Probably 15 minutes work there.












Andover, Vermont

Offline WESTbury

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Re: RESTORATIONS OF OLD LONGRIFLES-ADDED OBSERVATION
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2021, 05:44:37 PM »
Rich,

Great observations and photos. Pat Hornberger, to his credit, included some "plain" rifles in his book, as did Shumway in RCA Vol 1. I do not have RCA Vol 2 so I cannot comment on it.

I do have a copy of Heckert's book on the way so hopefully, I'll have another point of view.

Kent
"We are not about to send American Boys 9 to 10 thousand miles away from home to do what Asian Boys ought to be doing for themselves."
President Lyndon B. Johnson October 21, 1964