Author Topic: Noobie with Long Gun who is interested in hints to verify authenticity.  (Read 1149 times)

Offline rednosechappy

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Hello, I am the placeholder for a long rifle that has "been in the attic" seriously for 50 years. The backstory isn't very interesting but the gun has recently put into my hands to take care of it.  I am curious if there is anything obvious about this rifle that "yells" replica or authentic. I am not a gun person, but I do appreciate history and so I am curious in terms of about what I have, and perhaps an approximate date of construction and location where it was built. The only things I have sorta figured out from peeking online is that it seems to be a Pa longrifle and that the company stamped on top of the barrel was in Philadelphia , C Bird & Co.  This company was listed on some random website mentioning they were in business from 1812-1820 and that they were lockmakers.  This company was inscribed on some Kentucky rifles and flintlock pistols.
So, I am asking all you enthusiasts.....what do you know about this gun and what would you like to share?

Thanks!

Rednosechappy




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Offline dogbest

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Nice gun!

Offline Tanselman

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Your rifle appears to be a good quality restock of some original parts. The stock appears new as determined by its sharp edges on the side facing [no small dings or scratches from years of use] and no staining from brass oxides rubbing off into the stock wood next to the patchbox and butt plate. The patchbox mimics an older "key hole" design used around Pittsburgh, but it also appears modern. The engraving, while nicely done, is a modern style, not a ca. 1825 style, and the box appears mounted with modern brass screws rather than the iron screws an original gun would have. The inlays also appear modern to me. I believe the barrel may be from an original longrifle with the tang later extended, as well as the guard, and perhaps the triggers and butt plate being original. The name plate on the barrel may have been present on an old, original barrel that was re-used, but I believe the uneven stamping of the "Bird & Co." with individual letter stamps was done when the rifle was restocked, probably in the 1960s. An original rifle of this style would have a darker, more oxidized finish, and a lot more dings and scratches in the wood. The lock is also rebuilt from what appears to be both old and new parts, many not appropriate to the style of a ca. 1825  rifle.  Shelby Gallien
« Last Edit: May 15, 2019, 03:55:32 AM by Tanselman »

Offline JTR

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I agree with Tanselman.
John
John Robbins

Offline Brent English

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I agree with Tanselman too, and would just add that for a circa 1960's restock of a blend of old and new parts, it's better than most.  The overall styling and execution are well done, and the builder chose a nice piece of wood.  In case your wondering, the gun probably has more sentimental value than monetary value, but nevertheless, a nice find.
Done right is better than done fast.

Offline rednosechappy

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Thank you all for giving me some ideas of what this rifle could be and how it was fabricated.  I live in the Northeast, would you suggest that I show this item to somebody live?  I guess I am asking if you have any hints to clubs or museums or private dealers up my way that show your same passion and expertise?  I live in Pennsylvania and I wouldn't mind driving from anywhere between Maryland and New York or even Delaware or New Jersey.  I am curious about how someone would create such a hybrid rifle.  The historical part of recreating this weapon is very intriguing to me.

Thanks for taking your time for educating me...even just a small bit.



Offline wormey

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The opinions you have gotten are right on the money.  In your quest for information, stay away from gun shows and gun stores.  The information you get will be wrong and all over the place.  There are lots of knowledgeable people in Pennsylvania on longrifles and hopefully they will chime in here.  You came to the right place to find answers.  Congratulations on your acquisition.  Wormey

Offline JV Puleo

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It's an inexpensive Birmingham export lock - I suspect "Bird & Co." were importers or, more likely hardware dealers, They certainly weren't lock makers. I have noticed that the British locks found on many American long rifles are virtually always of better quality. A rifles was a relatively expensive item and it simply wasn't done to use a cheap lock - unless that was all that was available. It was no different then than it is now.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2019, 10:35:23 PM by JV Puleo »