Author Topic: Inside diameter of ramrod pipes  (Read 430 times)

Offline Nemovir

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Inside diameter of ramrod pipes
« on: September 01, 2019, 07:37:16 AM »
I have to ask,  are the pipes inside diameter larger as they go up the stock?  Reason I ask is that Iím thinking of changing my ramrod for a one in brass. I have some short pieces of different diameter. Found that the thickest slid down the topmost pipe, but got stuck on the next.

Offline Dphariss

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Re: Inside diameter of ramrod pipes
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2019, 03:37:22 PM »
I have to ask,  are the pipes inside diameter larger as they go up the stock?  Reason I ask is that Iím thinking of changing my ramrod for a one in brass. I have some short pieces of different diameter. Found that the thickest slid down the topmost pipe, but got stuck on the next.

Sometimes the upper one is. I tend to do this, sometimes.

Dan
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Offline T*O*F

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Re: Inside diameter of ramrod pipes
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2019, 04:09:17 PM »
If this is on an existing gun, the pipes are probably inlet slightly cockeyed causing interference.  Wood is more forgiving than brass.
Dave Kanger

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Offline Nemovir

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Re: Inside diameter of ramrod pipes
« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2019, 04:32:20 PM »
If this is on an existing gun, the pipes are probably inlet slightly cockeyed causing interference.  Wood is more forgiving than brass.

That would explain why a stronger material, like metal, is not used.  Of course, there is the additional cost of brass.  Thank you, i will keep the wood rod.

Offline T*O*F

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Re: Inside diameter of ramrod pipes
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2019, 11:29:28 PM »
Quote
That would explain why a stronger material, like metal, is not used.
No, that doesn't explain it.  Guys gripe enough about guns being nose heavy and a brass ramrod would just exacerbate that problem.  Military arms routinely use steel ramrods, but they are very skinny.  Also, grit becomes embedded in a brass rod and leads to more rapid wear at the muzzle.

However, after inletting my thimbles, I have a length of 3/8ths steel rod that I insert into the thimbles and down into the forestock.  This lines everything up straight.  Then I drill my holes for the retaining pins and everything is then pinned straight.
Dave Kanger

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Offline D. Taylor Sapergia

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Re: Inside diameter of ramrod pipes
« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2019, 08:07:31 PM »
I use wooden rods - hickory or osage orange - and taper them all.  So I make my pipes to match.  I often start with a 1/2" blank, even in a .50 cal rifle.  The small end, inside the rod hole, pushes the ball down the bore.  I do not flip my rods end for end.
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Offline Daryl

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Re: Inside diameter of ramrod pipes
« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2019, 08:21:52 PM »
Muzzle weight helps for offhand shooting, which is why the exaggerated Olympic-style of Standing, shooting.
The Olympic Shooters of the 19th, 20th and 21st Centuries have all copied the 18th & 19th century Swiss form
 of holding rifles for standing shooting. The 'offhand' is holding a palm rest, or is positioned just in front of the
trigger guard, thus accentuating the muzzle's weight, in effect increasing the muzzle weight which makes for
steadier "standing or offhand" shooting.
If a rifle is too light for good holding, replacing the ram-rod with a steel or brass one, will help increase the fore
-ward weight. I have done this myself when younger, however now almost 70 yrs old, I find those "too-light" guns
hold much easier and the original wooden rod works just fine. ;D
Back at "the turn", Harry Pope used to say that a woman's offhand rifle should weigh 12 pounds, while a "MAN'S"
offhand rifle should weigh 16 pounds.
My best-ever 100yard offhand target scored 99/100. I used a 22 pound rifle, but, I was only 23yrs. old & considerably
stronger than I am today.
Daryl

"a gun without hammers is like a spaniel without ears" King George V