Author Topic: in Search of...Smithsonian "transitional rifle" pics  (Read 947 times)

Offline backsplash75

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in Search of...Smithsonian "transitional rifle" pics
« on: May 06, 2020, 05:40:00 PM »
This rifle was in the Smithsonian's "Price of Freedom" exhibit over a decade ago, and the photography is limited (Smithsonian database has only one), I am pretty sure it was published elsewhere, does anyone have better images?



American Long Rifle
Date: about 1760
Catalog #: 1979.0516.01    Accession #: 1979.0516
Credit: Division of Military History and Diplomacy, National Museum of American History

Dimensions / Weight
Dimensions: 8" H x 60" W x 2.5" D
Physical Description
American long rifle, .54 caliber with wooden patchbox.
Specific History
This early example of the American long rifle reflects its Germanic origins. It has a wooden patchbox for storing patches to load and clean with; a flared muzzle and thick shoulder stock which are like that of the German Jaeger rifle.





« Last Edit: May 06, 2020, 05:48:53 PM by backsplash75 »

Offline Eric Kettenburg

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Re: in Search of...Smithsonian "transitional rifle" pics
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2020, 05:54:50 PM »
I can't get the pics to open up larger, for some reason.  Isn't that the "tulip rifle?"
Strange women lying in ponds, distributing swords, is no basis for a system of government!

Online rich pierce

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Re: in Search of...Smithsonian "transitional rifle" pics
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2020, 05:55:14 PM »
Looks like rifle 110 in Rifles of Colonial America volume 2. Iím basing that on guard shape and architecture.

Some think 110 may be Scandinavian. Itís stocked in birch. Itís a smooth rifle. Carving is crude and the cheekpiece is round.

Just read Ericís reply. Could be the tulip rifle.
St. Louis, Missouri

Offline backsplash75

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Re: in Search of...Smithsonian "transitional rifle" pics
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2020, 07:14:20 PM »
The lock looks different than the Tulip rifle's lock with the filed line on the tail. Looks REALLY close to RCA 110 and has a similar OAL, but the Smithsonian object info for the gun says .54 and RCA110 is listed as .51", of course one of those might be a typo.
 

« Last Edit: May 06, 2020, 08:13:22 PM by backsplash75 »

Offline Eric Kettenburg

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Re: in Search of...Smithsonian "transitional rifle" pics
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2020, 08:06:09 PM »
Oh yeah, I think you're right - it's 110.  I think I was merging that one and the tulip rifle together in my mind because quite a number of folks think both of them may be Scandinavian.  It's an interesting hypothesis, and very possibly accurate.
Strange women lying in ponds, distributing swords, is no basis for a system of government!

Offline backsplash75

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Re: in Search of...Smithsonian "transitional rifle" pics
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2020, 08:50:56 PM »
thanks for the input fellas!  :)

Offline smart dog

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Re: in Search of...Smithsonian "transitional rifle" pics
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2020, 12:39:24 AM »
Hi,
Another interesting note about the Smithsonian display is the matchlock gun in the case (the "Newtown gun") is a 20th century fake. 

dave
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Offline backsplash75

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Re: in Search of...Smithsonian "transitional rifle" pics
« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2020, 08:36:36 PM »
Hi,
Another interesting note about the Smithsonian display is the matchlock gun in the case (the "Newtown gun") is a 20th century fake. 

dave

One can get in a good bit of trouble pointing out such things in certain crowds. That isn't the only funky inscribed/branded gun is suspicious at that institution.  :o

Offline mr. no gold

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Re: in Search of...Smithsonian "transitional rifle" pics
« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2020, 08:44:14 PM »
And speaking of the Smithsonian, it is surprising how few Kentucky Rifles they have when compared with all of the other weapon types. I had an opportunity a number of years ago to go 'inside' for a tour and had expected to see some spectacular things, but the best I saw was Koons Maryland rifle which had a brass sun shield on the barrel. I think that the powder horn collection they have may be a different story.
Dick