Author Topic: Trio of Interesting old horns  (Read 736 times)

Offline G. Elsenbeck

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1046
Trio of Interesting old horns
« on: July 04, 2020, 08:58:16 PM »
Other than their size they seem to have been made for some purpose, but may have been started and then stopped?  All three little gems have 1/8" holes drilled in the spouts, perhaps some funnels for filling their storage horns??
 

 

 
Journeyman in the Honourable Company of Horners (HCH) and a member in the Contemporary Longrifle Association (CLA)

There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness."

Offline Cory Joe Stewart

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1511
    • My etsy shop
Re: Trio of Interesting old horns
« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2020, 10:13:19 PM »
That would be my guess, a funnel of some sort.

Cory Joe Stewart

Offline Tim Crosby

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 12503
  • AKA TimBuckII
Re: Trio of Interesting old horns
« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2020, 11:26:39 PM »
 Neat. I'd give them a new lease on life and flatten them out, some Brass or Tin on the base, maybe an applied antler tip and a couple of bands each.

   Tim

Offline G. Elsenbeck

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1046
Re: Trio of Interesting old horns
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2020, 11:58:20 PM »
Tim, you're getting scarier, I was thinking of doing that to just one of them, lol.  Or, is your name Karnac?
Journeyman in the Honourable Company of Horners (HCH) and a member in the Contemporary Longrifle Association (CLA)

There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness."

Offline Notchy Bob

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 122
Re: Trio of Interesting old horns
« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2020, 05:43:20 AM »
I think they may be "cupping horns."  The practice of "cupping" supposedly reduced pain and improved circulation.  It was pretty widespread in times past, and I think it may be enjoying a resurgence of interest.  The larger, open end of the horn is applied to the bare skin, usually of one's back.  A vacuum is created within the horn to create a suction.  This may result in induration or even bruising, but it was (is) supposed to be beneficial. 

"Cups" are now often made of glass.  I understand they can be heated, applied to the skin, and rapidly cooled to create the vacuum.  However, I have read that folk healers using horns like these would put a little wad of something gooey in their mouth, something like strands of sinew chewed and formed into a little ball.  They would then put their lips to the small end of the horn and suck on it to create the vacuum, then manipulate the wad of sinew or whatever with the tongue into the small hole in the end of the horn to plug it.  I think the horns or cups are left on until the vacuum decreases and they fall off.

Sound wierd?  You bet!  However, I saw a bison horn tip that was formed just like these pictured in a book published by the Buffalo Bill Historical Center some time back.  It was identified as a cupping horn used by some unidentified Native American healer.  I didn't know what a cupping horn was, so I looked it up.  You can do the same.  Google "cupping horn" and take a gander at some of the images.

I think I'll stick with Ibuprofen.

Notchy Bob
"Should have kept the old ways just as much as I could, and the tradition that guarded us.  Should have rode horses.  Kept dogs."

from The Antelope Wife

Offline 577SXS

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 137
Re: Trio of Interesting old horns
« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2020, 06:30:56 PM »
If the hole is counter sunk, beveled they may be fox horns.