Author Topic: Muzzle plugs, the proper term?  (Read 1697 times)

Offline WadePatton

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Muzzle plugs, the proper term?
« on: August 17, 2020, 05:38:47 PM »
I can't recall the name of the plugs that were sometimes used in guns BITD, could someone remind me?

Any other comments about those objects, pics perhaps, would be appreciated.  Thanks.
Hold to the Wind

Offline Bob McBride

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Re: Muzzle plugs, the proper term?
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2020, 05:40:44 PM »
Are you talking about Tompions?

Offline Bob McBride

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Re: Muzzle plugs, the proper term?
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2020, 05:42:09 PM »





Offline WadePatton

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Re: Muzzle plugs, the proper term?
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2020, 05:52:10 PM »
That's it!   Thanks. 

Yes, a fellow mentioned dirt dabbers getting into a bore and I thought about all the holey screens and cracks and barrels I have...

Might have to start plugging everything to keep the spiders out dabbers from getting any ideas.
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Offline Bob McBride

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Re: Muzzle plugs, the proper term?
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2020, 05:54:30 PM »
I might use a piece of screen of if was concerned about that. No moisture lock. They are neat though. I have a few.

Offline MuskratMike

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Re: Muzzle plugs, the proper term?
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2020, 06:00:38 PM »
Bob: is there anything you don't have? I believe going through your shop would like being in a museum.
"Muskrat" Mike McGuire
Keep your eyes on the skyline, your flint sharp and powder dry.

Offline Bob McBride

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Re: Muzzle plugs, the proper term?
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2020, 06:12:00 PM »
Bob: is there anything you don't have? I believe going through your shop would like being in a museum.

Well, nothing like some of the guys on here but when I buy a gun I tend to pick up all the little bits used or issued with it. When I sell the gun I canít bear to part with them thinking about the next one I find. Ie, I picked up an original tompion and nipple protector for my old Barnett P53 and still have them though the musket is long gone. I enjoy tracking that little stuff down. Part of my business is importing antiques from EU so I have pretty fair contacts for finding original widgets.

Offline LRB

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Re: Muzzle plugs, the proper term?
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2020, 06:23:17 PM »
Common wood tompions draw moisture. You might want to use horn or something that doesn't.

Offline WadePatton

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Re: Muzzle plugs, the proper term?
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2020, 07:16:00 PM »
Common wood tompions draw moisture. You might want to use horn or something that doesn't.

Thanks for the insight.  Everything must have trade-offs.
Hold to the Wind

Offline Bob McBride

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Re: Muzzle plugs, the proper term?
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2020, 07:30:59 PM »
Common wood tompions draw moisture. You might want to use horn or something that doesn't.

Thanks for the insight.  Everything must have trade-offs.

There were originals made with a compression screw and cork. Iím not sure it worked any better at not trapping moisture.

Offline D. Taylor Sapergia

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Re: Muzzle plugs, the proper term?
« Reply #10 on: August 17, 2020, 08:20:36 PM »
Unless your bore is allowed to breathe, it will rust.  I would be opposed to putting a plug in the muzzle of my muzzle loading gun...ever.
D. Taylor Sapergia
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Offline jdm

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Re: Muzzle plugs, the proper term?
« Reply #11 on: August 17, 2020, 09:51:28 PM »
Store them muzzle down.      That's the way I store the ones in the gun safe.        If hanging on a wall that would not work out so well  be kind of weird  really
« Last Edit: August 18, 2020, 01:09:41 AM by jdm »
JIM

Offline Clark Badgett

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Re: Muzzle plugs, the proper term?
« Reply #12 on: August 18, 2020, 03:18:16 AM »
Common wood tompions draw moisture. You might want to use horn or something that doesn't.

Thanks for the insight.  Everything must have trade-offs.

There were originals made with a compression screw and cork. Iím not sure it worked any better at not trapping moisture.

Those were the English type, usually associated with the P.53 Enfield. Most American military types were just plain ole wood. I don't know if I've ever seen a civilian version, but it could be possible.
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Offline Panzerschwein

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Re: Muzzle plugs, the proper term?
« Reply #13 on: August 18, 2020, 03:22:06 AM »
Bob: is there anything you don't have? I believe going through your shop would like being in a museum.

Have you seen Bobís shop on Black Powder TV?

Just stunning... Bob, you have the best collection of rifles, smoothies, horns and pouches Iíve yet ever seen in my entire life.

I want to be like you when I grow up!  ;D

Offline bob in the woods

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Re: Muzzle plugs, the proper term?
« Reply #14 on: August 18, 2020, 06:30:35 AM »
When out in the woods during the winter, in deep snow, I have used a small square of blanket material attached to a string and feather to "plug" the muzzle and keep the snow out. The string and feather keep me from forgetting to pull it out before shooting. It also helps clear the muzzle if I do fall and get in the snow.

Offline JohnnyFM

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Re: Muzzle plugs, the proper term?
« Reply #15 on: August 18, 2020, 09:15:50 AM »
To avoid dirt Dobbers  and other such critters, clean and shoot often.