Author Topic: A whatzit gun  (Read 1035 times)

Offline Lucky R A

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A whatzit gun
« on: July 23, 2020, 03:43:52 AM »
         A gentleman brought the below pictured gun into the shop to see if i could tell him anything about it.  There are no markings of any kind on the gun.  Obviously it is late percussion period, but the architecture is rather distinctive as it the  trigger guard.   there are some mother of pearl inlays, along with the horse shoe inlay and two stars.  so, if anyone has seen anything like this or could put a location or maker to it I would be appreciative. 











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Online P.Bigham

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Re: A whatzit gun
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2020, 04:20:34 AM »
No clue Iíll guess Texas.
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Offline Hungry Horse

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Re: A whatzit gun
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2020, 03:56:52 PM »
 This looks to be a gun build from parts scavenged from at least one old wrecked rifle. I love the triggerguard and triggers. I had a chance some years ago to examine a SMR of unknown origins that had a similar hand forged iron version of this guard and wide spaced triggers very similar to these.

  Hungry Horse

Offline Mike Brooks

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Re: A whatzit gun
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2020, 04:26:00 PM »
Didn't they do trigger guards similar to that in Georgia?
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Offline Craig Wilcox

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Re: A whatzit gun
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2020, 07:33:13 PM »
I wish we  could find a location for it based on the baling wire used to hold the trigger guard on, but that would have to include almost every country in the Western Hemisphere.  Probably NOT from NYC or Philadelphia, tho I am sure they did use hay bales back in the day.

No, my money, based on the overall look of the longrifle, would be Kentucky or Eastern Tennessee.  Has a comfortable, useful look about it.
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Offline Lucky R A

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Re: A whatzit gun
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2020, 09:32:21 PM »
Craig, 
     Funny you should mention the wire, it isn't bailing wire, but copper similar to the bare two wire electrical systems that used to be used in houses.
     I forgot to photograph it, but it has a long breech tang ending in a point and is held in place w/ three screws.  The wire reinforcement doesn't seem to serve any purpose.

Ron
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Online flinchrocket

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Re: A whatzit gun
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2020, 09:56:33 PM »
I thought it looked like the wire was holding the trigger plate up.

Offline JTR

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Re: A whatzit gun
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2020, 10:05:02 PM »
So what is the little flower thing inlet in the cheekpiece side, inside the horse shoe?
I'd bet the flower is native to the region of the gun?

A guess, horse shoe, stars = Texas
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Offline WadePatton

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Re: A whatzit gun
« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2020, 10:06:35 PM »
Yeah, I was going to say that I'd never seen copper bailing wire.  Point covered.  What does the lockplate side look like? The sights?  The barrel straight, tapered, or swamped?

Is the wrist as slab-sided as it appears in your pics?  Looks dreadfully flat and with no panel on the rear of the lock (or much panels at all), and that spacer at the front of the guard, I'd be inclined to agree with the old parts re-build thinking. The mishmash of adornment and flatness make me think it's a redo. Maybe late guns were all slabby? I don't know. Overlook me.  ;)
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Online flinchrocket

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Re: A whatzit gun
« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2020, 10:24:22 PM »
So what is the little flower thing inlet in the cheekpiece side, inside the horse shoe?
I'd bet the flower is native to the region of the gun?

A guess, horse shoe, stars = Texas
Maybe,Yellow Roses

Offline Levy

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Re: A whatzit gun
« Reply #10 on: July 23, 2020, 11:13:42 PM »
I bought a modern manufactured/investment cast iron trigger guard at one of the Shows I attended that follows the basic shape of the one on this rifle, only plainer without the decorative filing.  the bow is very shallow and it would be difficult to fit a Davis #4 trigger in it without shortening the triggers.  James Levy
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Offline Tanselman

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Re: A whatzit gun
« Reply #11 on: August 04, 2020, 01:05:15 AM »
I've seen a couple of guards rather similar to this one. That, plus the oval inlay in the cheek and butt profile (but not cheekpiece), suggest to me a Carolina origin, perhaps more South Carolina than North Carolina. I see no connection to Kentucky gunmaking. Shelby Gallien

Offline redheart

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Re: A whatzit gun
« Reply #12 on: August 04, 2020, 03:48:05 AM »
So what is the little flower thing inlet in the cheekpiece side, inside the horse shoe?
I'd bet the flower is native to the region of the gun?

A guess, horse shoe, stars = Texas
I'm guessing it's a button that came off of his favorite sweetheart. :)