Author Topic: Silver inlays, how early?  (Read 1027 times)

Offline ChrisB

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Silver inlays, how early?
« on: October 13, 2020, 09:00:59 PM »
What period during the 18th century did rifle makers start to use silver inlays in the stock, more specificially in the butt, around or on the cheek rest and would they have been elongated stars or half moons  that seem to be popular in the late 18th and in to the 19th century? I have looked through all my books and searched the interweb but it would appear that it was unlikley, in general that is, to be before the Rev. War when you kicked us Brits out ???
Just curious.
Thanks,
Chris  8)
« Last Edit: October 13, 2020, 09:17:53 PM by rich pierce »

Offline Craig Wilcox

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Re: Silver inlays, how early?
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2020, 08:16:05 PM »
Chris, I may be wrong, but IIRC, Richard (aka Pukka Bundook here) referenced several very old snap-haunces and other old, early firearms, were decorated with silver and such.  Gorgeous things, they were.  You might PM him and be able to enjoy the very old firearms.
Craig Wilcox
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Offline WadePatton

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Re: Silver inlays, how early?
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2020, 09:34:22 PM »
You may very well know this but I must throw this in: Silver has been used by man for a very long time-one of the oldest known metals.

"German Silver" has not, don't make that mistake.  ;)
Hold to the Wind

Offline B.Barker

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Re: Silver inlays, how early?
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2020, 04:07:32 AM »
Christian Oerter used silver inlays in the early to mid 1770's.

Offline vanu

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Re: Silver inlays, how early?
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2020, 08:43:43 PM »
If you are talking about American longrifles; with the exception of the thumb-piece on the wrist, you really don't see much in the way of silver inlays until the mid-1780's. There are exceptions of course like C. Oerter, but in general the 1790's seems to be the beginning of the popularization of numerous silver inlays on American longrifles. Further complicating this interpretation is addition of inlays on an early rifle at a later date, such as a silver star added on the cheek piece. Many years ago I owned a rifle that was probably from the around 1780 that had a star added in the 1810 range based on the Federal style of the star and engraving, possibly an attempt at modernizing it? So in my opinion, if you are stocking a rifle, a reasonable date to look at is mid-late 1780's 1790 as rule to guide you on the style of rifle one would feel justified in adding silver inlays.

Bruce

Offline ChrisB

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Re: Silver inlays, how early?
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2020, 01:20:23 AM »
Thanks for your replies and information, very helpful.
Take care all.
Chris

Offline Not English

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Re: Silver inlays, how early?
« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2020, 06:16:27 AM »
There were several laws regarding the destruction of English silver coins in the colonies passed by Parliament. English coin was about the only source of silver in the colonial era. These laws obviously point to the use of silver decoration prior to the US revolution.

Offline JTR

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Re: Silver inlays, how early?
« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2020, 06:34:54 PM »
And if you want to save some money on the silver, most all the early original silver inlays I've seen are thin, like 10 - 15 thousands thin.
John Robbins