Author Topic: Tang Shaping  (Read 985 times)

Offline Eric Smith

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Tang Shaping
« on: October 20, 2020, 11:22:18 PM »
I am anticipating doing some saw work on a breech plug tang soon. I noticed I am down to my last three jewelers saw blades. I thought I might buy some more from Rio Grande. Then I got to thinking I should upgrade to the Knew Concepts saw. I did some perusing in the search feature but got confused with it all. There are so many KC saw with this feature and that feature. What are ya'll using, or recommend currently? Also, if cutting on a tang, what blade, etc, number, etc. Same for cutting .4 brass. Also, what blade for .125 brass? Many thanks, in advance.

Eric Smith

Offline Acer Saccharum

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Re: Tang Shaping
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2020, 11:51:38 PM »
Thick steel is tough going with a jeweler's saw. If it's .4 thick, get the coarsest blade you can get. If you're cutting 1/8" brass, you want 3 teeth at any given time to be in the material to avoid catchting, and breaking, the blade.


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Online rich pierce

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Re: Tang Shaping
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2020, 12:11:26 AM »
Hacksaw and files work for me.
Andover, Vermont

Offline J. Talbert

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Re: Tang Shaping
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2020, 02:15:25 AM »
Hacksaw and files work for me.

I'm with Rich when it comes to the tang.  If I spent all that time cutting it with a jewler's saw I'd still need to finish it with files.

Jeff
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Offline smart dog

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Re: Tang Shaping
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2020, 02:20:12 AM »
Hi,
Don't use a jewelers saw on a steel barrel tang. Use a hacksaw and files.  I know of what I speak.  For other thinner metals, the Knew Concept saws are very good.  get one with a deep throat.

 









dave
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Offline flatsguide

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Re: Tang Shaping
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2020, 04:59:15 PM »
All done with files, just take you time and not rush it.
Good luck Richard







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Offline Eric Smith

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Re: Tang Shaping
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2020, 06:59:23 PM »
Thanks for the advice and the photos.
Eric Smith

Offline john bohan

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Re: Tang Shaping
« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2020, 10:13:40 PM »
I did my last one with a burring tool in a battery powered drill then finished with files.

Offline jerrywh

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Re: Tang Shaping
« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2020, 10:16:39 PM »
I use a #3 blade for 1/8" brass or steel. For .4 steel I use a hack saw.  I have a half dosen jewelers saws -- which ever works best.  Never buy cheap blades. chinese blades are good if your cutting fried shrimp.
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Offline T*O*F

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Re: Tang Shaping
« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2020, 11:49:04 PM »
I drill the inside curves with the correct sized drill bit, then finish with a hack saw, files, and sometimes a belt sander.
Dave Kanger

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Offline Craig Wilcox

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Re: Tang Shaping
« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2020, 11:54:13 PM »
Eric, I currently use a KC with a 5" throat.  My "go to" blades are generally 2/0 to #3, but I keep 6/0 and 8/0 on hand for really fine cutting, and #3 and #5 for the thicker stuff.

The jeweler's saw, for me, is a lot more accurate than a hacksaw - never been good with one.  Consequently, I built several airplanes, cutting the majority of the 4130 steel and various grades of aluminum with my trusty old jeweler's saw.  I think that the thickest I cut was 1/4" and 1/8", but almost all the other stuff was .032 to .062.  With that saw, it was very easy for me to cut to the center of a red sharpie line, and eliminate a whole lot of filing - couple passes was all it took to eliminate the saw marks.

I generally buy my blades from Rio, and buy a gross at a time.

Best of luck with your project- don't cut your thumb as Idid!
Craig Wilcox
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