Author Topic: Lock polishing  (Read 1412 times)

Offline A.Merrill

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Lock polishing
« on: November 22, 2020, 01:59:19 AM »
   When polishing a lock to leave in the white after a gun is finished, what's the finest gret sandpaper you use ?   Al
Alan K. Merrill

Offline J. Talbert

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2020, 02:20:24 AM »
Thatís a matter of taste and how fancy a gun youíre making.
Iíd say 400 grit would be sufficient for a basic rifle.
Opinions will surely vary.
Jeff

I might add, a fine wire wheel (such as can be gotten from Brownells),  turned in the drill press gives a great burnished finish, eliminating nearly all sanding marks.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2020, 02:27:14 AM by J. Talbert »
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Offline D. Taylor Sapergia

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2020, 03:03:38 AM »
Mr. Talbert is correct.  But I find that the finer the polish, the less chance the lock will have to rust.  So I polish mine to 1200 grit.

Regarding polishing, as you go to finer and finer abrasive, you will find that the time spent at each stage will become shorter and shorter.  Basically, one takes out all of the marks left by the last grade of paper/cloth abrasive material, and the finer marks take less time and effort to remove.  Always change the angle when changing to a new and finer grade of abrasive.
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Offline Mark Elliott

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2020, 03:06:26 AM »
I go to 600 if I am going to engrave it, which I am most of the time.

Offline Bob Roller

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2020, 05:06:14 AM »
Thatís a matter of taste and how fancy a gun youíre making.
Iíd say 400 grit would be sufficient for a basic rifle.
Opinions will surely vary.
Jeff

I might add, a fine wire wheel (such as can be gotten from Brownells),  turned in the drill press gives a great burnished finish, eliminating nearly all sanding marks.

Using the wire wheel in any orientation be it vertical or horizontal requires eye protection like
a face shield.I once had a wire come off a wheel and it was embedded in my chin and was over an inch in length
so please protect your self.
Bob Roller

Offline Fly Navy

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2020, 08:44:54 AM »
I sand to 400 grit and then use green scotch-brite. I'm not a fan of a high polish and like a fine brushed finish.

Offline alacran

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2020, 01:42:04 PM »
Grobet makes a fine wire wheel on a wooden hub. it has 4 rows of bristles .0025 diameter. You are not supposed to spin it above 500 RPM.
It leaves a fine finish that is more satin than glossy. I have used it without wearing gloves and the bristles are so soft that it will not cut the skin. K&G Knife supplies, and Brownels sell them.

[
« Last Edit: November 23, 2020, 02:24:13 PM by alacran »
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Offline Clark Badgett

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2020, 07:32:44 PM »

Using the wire wheel in any orientation be it vertical or horizontal requires eye protection like
a face shield.I once had a wire come off a wheel and it was embedded in my chin and was over an inch in length
so please protect your self.
Bob Roller

Mr. Roller is correct. I've had more little pieces of wire stuck into my skin than I care to admit at work.
Psalms 144

Offline J. Talbert

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2020, 02:10:13 AM »
I checked and the bristles on my wire wheel measure 0.004 inch.  They are so fine that my fingers routinely brush against them in use without any damage to my fingers.  I can also concur that if turned at too high an RPM it will eject wires.
As alacran said, it leaves more of satin finish rather than a high polish.

Jeff
"When the people find that they can vote themselves money, that will herald the end of the republic"  Benjamin Franklin

Offline Eric Kettenburg

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2020, 02:51:59 AM »
I won't claim to have seen some of the finest pieces made (historically).  What I will claim is that I personally have never seen a lock on an original rifle or fowler or whatever that looked finer than a modern *maybe* @ 320 or so.  You can always see fine scratches and always find some polished file work evidence, somewhere. 

Maybe some of the really high art Euro work was taken to a higher level but if so I have not seen it first hand.

And I have seen work at a much lesser level, that's for sure, even on fairly good quality locks.  Once casehardened, I don't think taking it to ridiculously polished levels is going to affect anything from a functional perspective.
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Offline Not English

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2020, 06:03:26 AM »
I use small scotchbrite wheels with a dremel type tool with good results. I'm sure the safety police will chime in, but EVERYONE SHOULD BE WORKING WITH PROPER SHOP SAFETY PRACTICES without the safety police chiming in every time someone suggests using power tools.

Dave

Offline alacran

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #11 on: November 23, 2020, 02:31:51 PM »
I use small scotchbrite wheels with a dremel type tool with good results. I'm sure the safety police will chime in, but EVERYONE SHOULD BE WORKING WITH PROPER SHOP SAFETY PRACTICES without the safety police chiming in every time someone suggests using power tools.

Dave
When I use any grinder, wire wheel , buffer etc. I use safety glasses and an N95 mask. When I use the carding wheel I spoke about in the previous post I usually wear 10mil nitrile gloves to keep the carded rust off my hands. Occasionally I will touch up a small part and I don't take the time to don gloves. That is how I found out that that fine a wire (.0025) wheel spinning at low RPMs will not cut or scratch you.
"From one thing know 10,,000 things" Miyamoto Musashi

Offline Bob Roller

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #12 on: November 23, 2020, 03:10:31 PM »
It ain't about "cutting and scratching"but it is about smaill diameter wires becoming
projectiles.Quite a few of us are used to a well equipped shop and use it frequently
and then there are others who are not.Power too;s can and will eat you alive and no
apologies are offered so caution must be used.
Bob Roller

Offline 577SXS

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #13 on: November 23, 2020, 03:29:42 PM »
I use die maker stones and go to 600 grit. With stones you can keep edges sharp and get into little details.

Offline 577SXS

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #14 on: November 23, 2020, 07:42:54 PM »
Here is where I get the stones. webinfo@gesswein.com

Offline Scota4570

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #15 on: November 23, 2020, 08:00:53 PM »
After filing and getting to about 320 grit paper.  Maroon scotchbrite blends it all to an even satin luster.  It is very fast.  On the parts where it is appropriate, I do use 120 polish-o-ray on a sewn wheel.  This take experience and judgement to not mess up, be careful.

Offline A.Merrill

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #16 on: November 26, 2020, 08:25:51 AM »
   Thank's for the replys.    Al
Alan K. Merrill

Offline Bob Roller

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #17 on: November 26, 2020, 03:37:51 PM »
Look in Shop Made Tools for Feb 2016 and see the remake I did on a common bench
grinder and this may help with some aspects of lock polishing.I still use it in my trigger
making.
Bob Roller

Offline varsity07840

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #18 on: November 26, 2020, 06:52:18 PM »
How about if you're going to give it an aged blue finish, in particular on a Kibler Colonial lock?

Offline Bob Roller

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #19 on: November 26, 2020, 07:23:55 PM »
How about if you're going to give it an aged blue finish, in particular on a Kibler Colonial lock?

If this is a follow up to my posting about the grinder modifications,I have no idea about how to
age any locks including my own.Chet Shoults used to polish locks until they looked like chrome
plating and so did I.After a while he offered bright polished,low luster and file finishes.I settled
for the gray finish left by sand or bead blasting.I would not now even try to dress up a lock or
anything else because the labor intensiveness involved is more than I want to do at my age.
Bob Roller

Offline D. Taylor Sapergia

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Re: Lock polishing
« Reply #20 on: November 26, 2020, 08:00:29 PM »
If you are going to rust brown or rust blue a lock, it depends upon the finish you want, ie:  scaled or polished...that determines how far to take the polish on a lock or barrel, for that matter.  Some folks like the look of flat browning, that is, no shine.  For that, drawfiling and 180 grit will suffice.  But if you intend to card away all the scale, such as when you rust blue, then the higher the polish, the better the brown/blue will look, to my eye, anyway.  I concur that original longrifles that I have examined are not taken to a high polish.
D. Taylor Sapergia
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Art is not an object.  It is the excitement inspired by the object.