Author Topic: Little late horn, “Pennsylvania Dutchy”  (Read 375 times)

Offline rich pierce

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Little late horn, “Pennsylvania Dutchy”
« on: May 04, 2021, 12:28:10 AM »
This tiny horn weighs like a feather. It’s less than 0.025” thick and is bug-damaged but a good example of a late percussion period scrimmed horn. It has a fish, several “hex signs”, a date of 1872, oak and other leaves, a shield, and so on.

















St. Louis, Missouri

Online Tim Crosby

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Re: Little late horn, “Pennsylvania Dutchy”
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2021, 12:59:56 AM »
 Neat find, the carving is well done.

    Tim

Offline Robert Wolfe

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Re: Little late horn, “Pennsylvania Dutchy”
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2021, 04:53:14 PM »
Nice. What is the plug made out of? Almost looks like cork?
Robert Wolfe
Northern Indiana

Offline rich pierce

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Re: Little late horn, “Pennsylvania Dutchy”
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2021, 05:45:12 PM »
Nice. What is the plug made out of? Almost looks like cork?

BINGO WE HAVE A WINNER!
Yes, improbably, the plug is cork. I was trying to figure it out. Thanks!
St. Louis, Missouri

Offline Robert Wolfe

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Re: Little late horn, “Pennsylvania Dutchy”
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2021, 08:30:51 PM »
Well, cork would certainly make for a light horn.....
Robert Wolfe
Northern Indiana

Offline mr. no gold

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Re: Little late horn, “Pennsylvania Dutchy”
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2021, 09:58:32 PM »
Nice little horn with some interesting engraving. Cork is not unheard of for end plugs especially for salt horns or horn containers not heavily used. This is the first powder horn I have seen with a cork end, however. Rather unique, I would say. The holes are unfortunate, but are all too common as the beetles seem to be almost everywhere.
I have always thought that dental bonding material could be used to close up small to large holes. It can be easily shaped and colored to whatever is called for. It hardens to about the same density as the horn itself. I have suggested this to some horn restorers, but they all seem to prefer other substances. Kits are available at dental supply houses if anyone wants to give it a try. Let us know how it works, if you please.
Dick

Offline Shreckmeister

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Re: Little late horn, “Pennsylvania Dutchy”
« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2021, 03:41:22 PM »
I’ve used resin mixed with horn filings and didn’t have to color it for small to medium hole repair. Turns out well.
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Offline Kevin

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Re: Little late horn, “Pennsylvania Dutchy”
« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2021, 04:05:52 PM »
Rich,

That's a really nice horn.  I noticed that on the "petals" of the one "hex sign" some have a line of 5 dots and some have 6 dots.  It's neat to see such "freeform" work, intended or not, on old horns.

Thanks for sharing,
Kevin

Offline mr. no gold

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Re: Little late horn, “Pennsylvania Dutchy”
« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2021, 08:24:11 AM »
If I am not mistaken, the dental bonding material is also a resin which may require a harder. It is light cured and is colored with additives. I am wearing some on my teeth as I write this. It seems to be easily mixed and worked to do the job.
Dick