Author Topic: Moisture in the pan  (Read 892 times)

Offline Bobcat

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Moisture in the pan
« on: January 17, 2022, 06:51:36 AM »
I am picking up some moisture in the pan of my flintlock, enough that it will coat the pan and the flint itself. Is this coming from the priming powder, or the main charge? Seems a bit oily, could it be cleaning residue? Puzzling. Thanks guys!

Offline flinchrocket

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Re: Moisture in the pan
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2022, 07:06:21 AM »
I thing it’s more to do with the humidity in the air.

Offline Daryl

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Re: Moisture in the pan
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2022, 07:43:35 AM »
After cleaning your gun, do you store it muzzle down? This way, all excess after-cleaning oils will drain out the muzzle, onto a cloth or board & not plug the vent.
If the gun is cleaned, dried and oiled, then stored butt down, or perhaps flat on a gun rack, it is most probable that the vent or maybe the flash-channel in a cap gun will be plugged with oil.

Usually in very high humidity, we will get moisture/water in the pan on the fouling from the or a shot just taken.
In those circumstances, many of us carry a rag or bit of cloth to wipe out the pan and underside of the frizzen, between shots, before priming anew.
It is not normal for moisture/water to form on any surface just from the humidity, unless the gun has been fired or bringing a cold gun into a warm house, for instance.
Daryl

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Offline Jim Evans

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Re: Moisture in the pan
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2022, 12:44:02 PM »
I like to wipe the pan,  flint  and frizzen  with an alcohol pad after each shot.The alcohol air dries real fast. In humid weather you may want to prime with 3F also.
US NAVY 1963-1985

Offline Dphariss

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Re: Moisture in the pan
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2022, 06:17:47 PM »
I am picking up some moisture in the pan of my flintlock, enough that it will coat the pan and the flint itself. Is this coming from the priming powder, or the main charge? Seems a bit oily, could it be cleaning residue? Puzzling. Thanks guys!
BP fouling sucks up water from the air like a sponge if the humidity is high. But under about 30%RH it will not. Properly made BP will not absorb significant water from the air unless there is fouling in contact with it.
As Daryl indicated you MUST store the gun muzzle down for at least 24 hours or so to prevent oil from pooling in the breech and/or running out the vent into the stock.
Crisis is the rallying cry of the tyrant”. James Madison

Offline Brokennock

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Re: Moisture in the pan
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2022, 06:22:06 PM »
I too wipe the pan and flint with an alcohol pad between shots.
Post cleaning muzzleloading are stored on a horizontal rack that angles then slightly muzzle down. While I try hard not to over oil, and usually use a thick product like mink oil or a beeswax and fat/oil blend, I put a small bit of rag in the muzzle to catch any possible drips. Even my unmentionable guns are muzzle down in the safe or wherever they happen to be leaning.

Offline Bobcat

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Re: Moisture in the pan
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2022, 01:22:15 AM »
I think I am guilty. Will start storing the rifle muzzle down. Like the idea of wiping with alcohol pad too. I am also going to try to cut down on the quantity of patch lube. Thanks guys, appreciate your ideas!

Offline Brokennock

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Re: Moisture in the pan
« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2022, 02:01:02 AM »
I think I am guilty. Will start storing the rifle muzzle down. Like the idea of wiping with alcohol pad too. I am also going to try to cut down on the quantity of patch lube. Thanks guys, appreciate your ideas!
If you are storing with oil in/on the bore post cleaning (as opposed to animal fat like mink oil) you really should at least swab with alcohol prior to loading the gun.

Offline Daryl

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Re: Moisture in the pan
« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2022, 03:53:53 AM »
Or not.  Since 1972, I've flushed the bore with WD40 AFTER drying it, then patched that out, then stored the rifle/gun.  Prior to loading, I've never run a patch into the bore and out. I've
never had trouble loading that first one, nor the next 50 or more.
I clean the barrel of every one of my guns with the breech submerged in 'cold' water (bucket), flushing water in and out, then drying the barrel in a towel, then drying the inside with successive
patched until dry.  This usually takes 3 to 5 patches depending on whether I reverse them for another pass. Usually cleaning the gun takes 4 to 6 patches all together. They get used several times
(cleanings) as well.

Am I saying this is the only way? - not at all. IT works for me.  Do what works for you!
« Last Edit: January 18, 2022, 07:22:58 AM by Daryl »
Daryl

"a gun without hammers is like a spaniel without ears" King George V

Offline bones92

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Re: Moisture in the pan
« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2022, 04:58:50 PM »
I understood the question to be about why the pan seems to get wet while firing.   I have this happen often when the humidity is high.  I attribute it to BP and the fouling attracting moisture.  On even moderately humid days, I sometimes wipe the pan, frizzen and flint with a dry, cotton cloth to remove the moisture. 
If it was easy, everyone would do it.

Offline Dphariss

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Re: Moisture in the pan
« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2022, 05:14:41 PM »
Or not.  Since 1972, I've flushed the bore with WD40 AFTER drying it, then patched that out, then stored the rifle/gun.  Prior to loading, I've never run a patch into the bore and out. I've
never had trouble loading that first one, nor the next 50 or more.
I clean the barrel of every one of my guns with the breech submerged in 'cold' water (bucket), flushing water in and out, then drying the barrel in a towel, then drying the inside with successive
patched until dry.  This usually takes 3 to 5 patches depending on whether I reverse them for another pass. Usually cleaning the gun takes 4 to 6 patches all together. They get used several times
(cleanings) as well.

Am I saying this is the only way? - not at all. IT works for me.  Do what works for you!

I use G96 Gun Treatment which leaves little to no "oil" in the bore if stored muzzle down on a paper towel for a time, 12-24, hours after cleaning. I never wipe it out before matches just load and shoot. If its middle of hunting season and the rifle might remain loaded for a time then I will wipe the bore with alcohol. Not sure its needed but do it anyway.

Dan
Crisis is the rallying cry of the tyrant”. James Madison

Offline Marcruger

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Re: Moisture in the pan
« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2022, 07:42:34 PM »
Humidity is rarely our friend.  I have had "soup" in the pan on humid days.  If I have time I always wipe the pan, frizzen and flint between shots.  I minimize the time between putting powder in the pan and a shot.  Part and parcel of our fascinating old sport. 

God Bless,   Marc

Offline utseabee

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Re: Moisture in the pan
« Reply #12 on: January 21, 2022, 02:26:48 AM »
I've found that switching to 3F or even 2F in the pan greatly reduces or eliminates the moisture/ fowling problem in the pan. Not sure why it works out that way, but for me it makes a big difference.
The difficult we do at once, the impossible takes a little longer.

Offline Prairie dog shooter

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Re: Moisture in the pan
« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2022, 07:32:50 PM »
When that happened to me, I discovered I wasn't getting all the fouling out of the vent liner.   

Offline EC121

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Re: Moisture in the pan
« Reply #14 on: February 05, 2022, 08:16:54 PM »
I use small pipe cleaners to clean the vent and G96 or Barricade on the barrel and lock.  Muzzle down overnight.  I bought a case of G96 many years ago, and I am finally down to my last can.  I used to tuck a strip of patching in my belt for wiping the pan moisture during a match.  When it got dirty, I loaded with it and got a clean strip. If I am hunting, I plug the vent with a round toothpick and don't prime until I see game.  The pan stays dry.  I don't take snap shots at game and usually have time to prime.