Author Topic: Long term storage  (Read 2243 times)

Offline Wil

  • Starting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 19
Long term storage
« on: March 15, 2023, 06:03:11 PM »
I've been in this game for a while but my inquiring mind would like to know what your favorite bore dressing is that you use for long term bore protection is against that dreaded rust.

Offline Majorjoel

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3119
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2023, 06:26:46 PM »
I use RIG grease.  Recommended by Ned Roberts in his book.  Never had any rust issues on guns left for years without use.
Joel Hall

Offline Wil

  • Starting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 19
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2023, 06:49:11 PM »
Was RIG easy to remove before shooting ? It's pretty thick and I'd be worried if I didn't get it all out.

Offline Scota4570

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2116
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2023, 08:17:28 PM »
For really long term I like LPS-3.  It goes on wet and dries like waxy cosmoline. 

Offline Daryl

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13865
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2023, 08:17:40 PM »
After cleaning and drying my gun's barrel, I do a flush with WD40, then patch out the excess from the bore blasting it out the nipple seat or vent, then wipe everything down with that patch and reassemble the gun.  I liberally spray my locks all over with WD40 to blast off any residual moisture, then set them aside while doing the bore. After the bore and outside barrel is finished with
I shake the lock off and wipe it down all over, then put it back in the gun.
Any fouling on the gun's stock of course is wiped off. The lock is cleaned in water with a toothbrush, shaken of and laid in the sun while I clean, dry and oil the barrel.
The gun then sits, muzzle down in the lockup until needed again. For long term storage, RIGG is used.
It is easily patched out with doubled flannelette patch on a jag. I like to double the patch (jag turned to allow) as the extra thickness allows even deep grooves & sharp corners of the land/groove
to be properly & well cleaned.
Daryl

"a gun without hammers is like a spaniel without ears" King George V

Offline JBJ

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 566
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2023, 08:20:34 PM »
I definitely second the choice of RIG. It works! I am sure that there are other greases that would work as well or better. And yes, it is a little bit of a bother to clean it out but that bit of difficulty in removing the product is what contributes to its' effectiveness. I used to have a can of a US mil rifle grease (really dark stuff that reminded me of axle grease) and it worked but was even more difficult to clean up. Although I have not used them for storage, I'll bet that some of the new synthetic wheel bearing greases would work a "treat" as the expression goes.

J.B.

Offline Wil

  • Starting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 19
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2023, 09:53:59 PM »
That'a funny about the RIG. I have had a jar of it in my cabinet for probably 25 years or so and haven't considered even using it in the bore of my muzzeloaders.

Offline Mike Brooks

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12537
    • Mike Brooks Gunmaker
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2023, 09:56:58 PM »
I'm using synthetic motor oil these days.
NEW WEBSITE! www.mikebrooksflintlocks.com
Say, any of you boys smithies? Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?

Offline doulos

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 146
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2023, 07:46:25 PM »
Wll   I would not worry about getting RIG grease out. Use patches with denatured alcohol on them . Ive also sprayed gunscrubber or brake cleaner through my breech of my cap guns.  The RIG is a lot easier to remove than rust.  There is a lot of good stuff out there to prevent rust.  But if I know this gun is not going to be touched for a long while RIG is pretty positive protection.

Offline Wil

  • Starting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 19
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2023, 08:51:13 PM »
I think my arm just got bent enough to where I believe I will try the RIG when I put them to bed for a long time. Thanks a lot for taking the time to reply to my post and adding your experience with RIG.

Offline AZshot

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 536
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #10 on: March 16, 2023, 11:43:59 PM »
I now live in the dry desert, but even when I lived in NC, I just ran an oiled patch down the bore and sometimes left the gun untouched for years.  Like when I went in the Navy.  Never had any rust.  I like CLP breakfree.

Offline Mike Brooks

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12537
    • Mike Brooks Gunmaker
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2023, 04:00:55 PM »
Transmission fluid and power stearing fluid mixed 50/50 is good too.
NEW WEBSITE! www.mikebrooksflintlocks.com
Say, any of you boys smithies? Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?

Offline Daryl

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13865
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2023, 08:59:17 PM »
That would work quite well, Mike. ;D
Daryl

"a gun without hammers is like a spaniel without ears" King George V

Offline Marcruger

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3585
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #13 on: March 17, 2023, 10:56:09 PM »
LONG term, RIG.  Shorter term, I use CLP or Marvel Mystery Oil.  The BPCR guys use that MMO, and it works great in muzzleloaders too.  Store muzzle down so you don't get your stock oiled up and punkish. 

Online MuskratMike

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1943
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #14 on: March 18, 2023, 12:56:54 AM »
How long are you referring to as "long term"?
Most of mine never see more than 60 days without being shot. I use WD40 as the final lube after the barrel has dried. If I was going to store for a longer term simply run a patch with WD40 down every 6 months or so. All the above posts look to me as equally good ideas. Kind of like the forever ongoing patch lube thread. No bad ideas just what works for you.
Happy St. Patrick's day!
"Muskrat" Mike McGuire
Keep your eyes on the skyline, your flint sharp and powder dry.

Offline Daryl

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13865
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #15 on: March 18, 2023, 01:26:29 AM »
Zackly.
Daryl

"a gun without hammers is like a spaniel without ears" King George V

Offline RebelSon

  • Starting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 24
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #16 on: March 18, 2023, 03:13:12 AM »
I used to be a bore butter guy. I don't use it anymore for shooting. I will say that t in the past I've come back to a gun after a year or more and only needed to clean it out of the bore. I also applied it to the lock after heating a little and it coated everything and then dried to a thin paste. A lock could sit that way for long as a lifetime and then be cleaned off and oiled up with something thin to slick things up and likely be as new. Where the fellas are talking about RIG grease is likely pretty similar, but I've not used it. I've been shooting all my guns fairly regular lately so after cleaning I just use a thin oil in the bore and lock and nearly always use Howard's Feed-N-Wax on the wood. I'm a fan. Keeps the wood from drying out-not all stocks are sealed as some are. Often I'll use it on the bores exterior as well.

Offline Wingshot

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 204
  • Brand new NMLRA member
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #17 on: March 18, 2023, 05:34:37 AM »
I used to be a bore butter guy. I don't use it anymore for shooting. I will say that t in the past I've come back to a gun after a year or more and only needed to clean it out of the bore. I also applied it to the lock after heating a little and it coated everything and then dried to a thin paste. A lock could sit that way for long as a lifetime and then be cleaned off and oiled up with something thin to slick things up and likely be as new. Where the fellas are talking about RIG grease is likely pretty similar, but I've not used it. I've been shooting all my guns fairly regular lately so after cleaning I just use a thin oil in the bore and lock and nearly always use Howard's Feed-N-Wax on the wood. I'm a fan. Keeps the wood from drying out-not all stocks are sealed as some are. Often I'll use it on the bores exterior as well.

If Iím putting one away between hunting season Iíll run a patch heavily laden with Wonder Lube. I warm the lock and wipe down the internals as you described. I also remove the nipple or drum screw and gob some in there as well. My GPR flint has a removable vent liner and I gob some in there as well. A thorough wipe down before pre season shooting has yet to show me any corrosion and we get some humidity in western PA. Iíve had guns stored for up to 3 years with zero rust issues.

Offline davec2

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2767
    • The Lucky Bag
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #18 on: March 18, 2023, 07:23:52 AM »
One of the best and most comprehensive tests of gun care and other commercial products for rust prevention, etc.  Long but very informative.

http://www.dayattherange.com/?page_id=3667

Bottom line, out of 46 products EXTENSIVELY tested , Frog Lube and WD 40 Specialist come out at the very top.  I do not use Frog Lube on the internals of any of my modern guns but do use it to wipe down all my muzzleloaders.  It's mostly coconut oil...but smells nice.  If you read through the above post, it eliminates a lot of the advertising hype and gets down to what works and what doesn't.
"No man will be a sailor who has contrivance enough to get himself into a jail; for being in a ship is being in a jail, with the chance of being drowned... a man in a jail has more room, better food, and commonly better company."
Dr. Samuel Johnson, 1780

Offline doulos

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 146
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #19 on: March 18, 2023, 08:08:07 AM »
Good test .. Actually surprised some of them didnt do better.  I have some wd 40 specialist but have not used it much. Maybe I should start.  Ive also used Eezox. But have to order it on line I never see it a gun shops or sporting goods suppliers anymore.  I might have to rethink my long term storage. I used Rig for a long time including when I lived in Florida. And I am surprised it didnt rank higher. But that did seem like a pretty solid test.  But I have seen other salt spray tests where stuff like Barricade and Gunseal scored very high.  I am always open to something better for rust protection.

Offline Wil

  • Starting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 19
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #20 on: March 18, 2023, 02:26:17 PM »
How long are you referring to as "long term"?
Most of mine never see more than 60 days without being shot. I use WD40 as the final lube after the barrel has dried. If I was going to store for a longer term simply run a patch with WD40 down every 6 months or so. All the above posts look to me as equally good ideas. Kind of like the forever ongoing patch lube thread. No bad ideas just what works for you.
Happy St. Patrick's day!
Some of mine don't see any action between hunting seasons and sometimes life gets in the way when I want to fire off a few of my others. But what really got me worried at all about it was when I ended up with my Dad's muzzeloader after he had passed. My bore scope revealed a heck of a mess, rust and pitted bore. He used Bore Butter for storage. That's all we ever used back when we got into this in the late 70s, early 80's.
And about patch lube threads...guilty!  lol

Offline Wil

  • Starting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 19
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #21 on: March 18, 2023, 02:39:23 PM »
That test makes me want to run out and buy WD-40 Specialist. I was very surprised that Barricade didn't rank much higher as I have seen a few other tests where it did come out pretty high up there. In fact, that is what I have been using in all my guns and so far, have been pretty lucky. Here in NE Ohio, I'm not really worried about getting any salt spray off the ocean though. Not yet, anyhow.

Offline doulos

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 146
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #22 on: March 18, 2023, 04:35:43 PM »
I've read tests that rank Barricade and Gun Seal much higher also.  I have some WD40 Specialist but have not tested it much. Actually surprised that RIG didnt place higher in that test. But Ive used it with good results for a long time . Even used it in Florida. But Im always open to something better. Ive also Used Eezox. But not extensively. And that seemed to score very well also.  Good link Dave.

Offline Daryl

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13865
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #23 on: March 18, 2023, 07:46:03 PM »
For those who live in the Eastern part of our Countries, I suggest you use something that ranks highly in any rust-tests. Humidity is your enemy.
Around the Great lakes is VERY bad, humidity wise.
When I lived back there, I just used Hoppe's #9 Solvent. Seemed to work for me in all of my suppository rifles over the years.
Out here in the West, the average humidity is 50%. At rendezvous B.C., the humidity will run from 6 to 8 & up to 70 % or so when it's raining.
We do get humidity upwards of 90% here in a downpour, but back easy in Southern Ontario, the humidity will be 100% with not a cloud in the sky
and over 100F temps. That is hard on rust preventatives trying to do their job.
Again, maybe it will be the last time, but I doubt it, Bore Butter seems virtually chap-stick with camphor oil added for the nice smell. With loose patched
loads, it will actually build up in the bore and be hard/difficult to remove. The stuff that builds up, will have BP fouling under it  = pitting.
Daryl

"a gun without hammers is like a spaniel without ears" King George V

Offline Wil

  • Starting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 19
Re: Long term storage
« Reply #24 on: March 19, 2023, 01:54:16 PM »
For those who live in the Eastern part of our Countries, I suggest you use something that ranks highly in any rust-tests. Humidity is your enemy.
Around the Great lakes is VERY bad, humidity wise.
When I lived back there, I just used Hoppe's #9 Solvent. Seemed to work for me in all of my suppository rifles over the years.
Out here in the West, the average humidity is 50%. At rendezvous B.C., the humidity will run from 6 to 8 & up to 70 % or so when it's raining.
We do get humidity upwards of 90% here in a downpour, but back easy in Southern Ontario, the humidity will be 100% with not a cloud in the sky
and over 100F temps. That is hard on rust preventatives trying to do their job.
Again, maybe it will be the last time, but I doubt it, Bore Butter seems virtually chap-stick with camphor oil added for the nice smell. With loose patched
loads, it will actually build up in the bore and be hard/difficult to remove. The stuff that builds up, will have BP fouling under it  = pitting.
Am I to assume that the Ox Yoke Wonder Lube 1000 is pretty much the same thing as Bore Butter? I have been thinking that it is,myself. I have that stuff laying around also.
edit: on further researching , the consensus out there believes that wonder lube is the same as bore butter,just a different name.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2023, 02:31:42 PM by Wil »