Author Topic: bore condition  (Read 1190 times)

Offline web365ster

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bore condition
« on: May 15, 2023, 05:24:58 PM »
I'm curious as to how relevant is bore condition when considering acquiring an antique long rifle? I tried doing a Search on the forum but got many "bore" hits and many "condition" hits and only a few "bore condition" hits.

Offline snapper

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Re: bore condition
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2023, 05:28:14 PM »
For me any gun I buy I plan on shooting it, so bore condition is important to me.

Fleener
My taste are simple:  I am easily satisfied with the best.  Winston Churchill

Offline Fyrstyk

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Re: bore condition
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2023, 05:52:38 PM »
I would ask to run a swab down the bore and then check it with a bore scope.  If serious pitting is revealed, then the gun may not be very accurate.  That being said, I have a 1840's .35 cap lock that the breach area was very corroded.In order to get any accuracy, I have to load with a dry felt wad over the powder then the patched ball.  Without the wad, patches were completely blown apart and accuracy suffered.  With the felt wad, the bore was sealed better under the patch, and accuracy improved to 1.25" at 25 yards with now blown patches.  A slightly pitted bore may surprise you with how it shoots.  It may be a bear to clean however.

Offline JTR

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Re: bore condition
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2023, 06:13:03 PM »
If you plan on shooting it, of course the bore is important if you hope to hit anything.
I don't collect old ones with an eye on shooting them, but do take a look at the bore to see if it's rifled or not..... Maybe stick a finger tip in ;-)

In the end, to me, if the overall gun is looking good, the bore condition is of little importance.

John

PS, It seems to me that most nice rifles have decent/nice bores.
John Robbins

Offline Tanselman

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Re: bore condition
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2023, 10:51:49 PM »
I'd echo John's statements above. Two worlds... those of shooters and those of collectors. I think with plain rifles of lesser value, the bore condition may play a bigger role simply because there are fewer attributes to value the gun by and bore condition is one of them. But as the artistic and historic value of a gun increases and it becomes more of a collectable than a shooter, the bore condition becomes less and less of an issue. Of course, there are always exceptions, and some shooters probably shoot great guns that should be more protected as collectables... and some beginning collectors acquire plainer rifles where bore condition is one of the few factors available to base value on.

We all prefer decent bores in our guns, but as a long-time collector of American longrifles, I'd never pass up a good rifle simply because the bore was rough or heavily worn... and other than looking at the muzzle for any unsightly damage and for traces of rifling [always like to know a gun's bore size and rifling pattern], I pay little attention to what's on down in the bore... other than if it's loaded or empty! In a way, heavily worn bores add character to rifles, showing they were really used and played a role in America's development... and were not just closet queens. 

So as John said, if you shoot, be careful with the bore, but if you collect, look at the entire gun and don't let a poor bore deter your decision to buy.

The one caveat to all this is collecting target rifles. They are a different breed, not made for hunting or protection, but specifically for precise target shooting. Target rifles, in my opinion, should have fine bores, otherwise their value is significantly dimished.   

Shelby Gallien
« Last Edit: May 15, 2023, 11:04:40 PM by Tanselman »

Offline jdm

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Re: bore condition
« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2023, 01:33:57 AM »
I agree with John and Shelby on this one.  If your a shooter it's a big deal. If your a collector it is not a consideration unless as       Shelby stated a target rifle.  I think if your collecting in the four or five figure range and shooting the antique  it could turn into a financial loss and damage a rare piece of history. Of course as with all collecting it's at the owners discretion.  Jim
JIM

Offline Avlrc

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Re: bore condition
« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2023, 03:49:57 PM »
 I never bought an antique longrifle with the intention of shooting; other than checking to see if a load is in the barrel, I have little concern about the condition of the bore. A mint bore on an antique long rifle adds little to no value to me.  Collectors of factory-built cartridge rifles are concerned about bores because they need something to make their rifles stand out, as they all look alike. 

Offline Daryl

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Re: bore condition
« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2023, 06:02:32 PM »
This rifle, made in approximately 1853, shoots GREAT!
It's finish has not been touched, except to add wax, perhaps, to it's micro-cracked finish.




Daryl

"a gun without hammers is like a spaniel without ears" King George V

Offline Shootsoldguns

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Re: bore condition
« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2023, 05:47:42 PM »
I'm curious as to how relevant is bore condition when considering acquiring an antique long rifle? I tried doing a Search on the forum but got many "bore" hits and many "condition" hits and only a few "bore condition" hits.
I've collected & competed with primarily original English & European ML firearms for over 50 years & have found that many of that produced the tightest groups had pitted bores but still retained excellent deep rifling.
That being said, those with pitted bores required some 'conditioning' with abrasives and sometimes lapping to make loading resistance uniform & cleaning easier.
Jeager rifles became my preferred rifle for offhand competition & big game hunting because of their light weight, superb balance & excellent accuracy with their deep rifling averaging typically of of one turn in length of the barrel.
Prior to old age issues preventing me from shooting long guns, this 7.5 lb. .70 cal. Danish Jaeger by I.C. Haugaard in Kiobenhaven became my favorite hunting & competition for many years. It's excellent untouched overall condition & bright bore when I acquired it about 45 years ago indicated it had been well cared for by a long line of shooters.
 






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