Author Topic: Sitting Fox Stamping?  (Read 1047 times)

Offline Panzerschwein

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Sitting Fox Stamping?
« on: June 07, 2023, 05:17:49 PM »
Does anyone know who could add the famous ďsitting fox inside a circleĒ stamp to the lock plate and barrel of my new northwest trade gun?

I see this stamp is available from Track:

https://www.trackofthewolf.com/Categories/PartDetail.aspx/1045/1/STAMP-FC

I am asking because it is very pretty and the red fox is also my spirit animal. Would this be something I could do myself? The lock is already finished in a brushed patina look. Would it need to be refinished or touched up with cold blue after stamping? Thank you!


Offline rich pierce

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Re: Sitting Fox Stamping?
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2023, 06:33:14 PM »
Stamping requires practice. Itís easy to get multiple hammer blows off just a bit. The bigger the stamp, the more challenging. If you do it yourself, practice on mild steel plate. Sometimes necessary to lean it, get an edge established, then straighten it up.
Andover, Vermont

Offline Hungry Horse

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Re: Sitting Fox Stamping?
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2023, 08:35:21 PM »
Green River Forge used the sitting fox on their tradeguns. I have two old Lott lock that they removed the Lott signature and added the sitting fox. One is acid etched, and the other is engraved. Stamping a lock plate is tricky at best.
 As the red fox being your spirit animal, you do realize the red fox is an introduced species to America not native.

Hungry Horse

Offline bluenoser

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Re: Sitting Fox Stamping?
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2023, 10:04:44 PM »
I recently put the sitting fox stamp on the rust blued Davis lock on a NW trade gun I built.  It was an after-thought of the owner and I cautioned him that there might be some damage to the finish.  Aside from letter stamps, it was my first stamping experience and I learned two things:
First - practice and then practice some more before tackling the parts.  I tried multiple hits on 1075, including straight-on and angling into it and found it impossible to completely avoid some misalignment.  For me, a single strike was the answer and the required weight of the hammer was surprising.  I started with a good swing on a 12 ounce hammer and didn't get consistently good results until I had graduated to a hammer weighing about 2 pounds.  You also need the part sitting on  good solid surface having some mass.  I used a small anvil.  In my experience, a bouncy work bench won't cut it.

Second - there was very little damage to the finish and what damage there was was limited to the bottom of the imprint.

Being the cautious type, I declined to stamp the barrel.

Thanks HH, I was unaware the red fox is an introduced species.

Offline MeliusCreekTrapper

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Re: Sitting Fox Stamping?
« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2023, 10:13:57 PM »
Green River Forge used the sitting fox on their tradeguns. I have two old Lott lock that they removed the Lott signature and added the sitting fox. One is acid etched, and the other is engraved. Stamping a lock plate is tricky at best.
 As the red fox being your spirit animal, you do realize the red fox is an introduced species to America not native.

Hungry Horse

Not to sidetrack the discussion, but the red fox IS native to the North American continent. There were some introduced from Europe, but recent studies have found no genetic trace of the introduced foxes in current US fox populations.

https://www.fs.usda.gov/research/treesearch/40806

Offline Mike Brooks

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Re: Sitting Fox Stamping?
« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2023, 12:49:15 AM »
I use a 4lb hammer, no messin around, get er done. And yes, all the red foxes here in Iowa are native. They have the typical Iowan accent when speaking.
NEW WEBSITE! www.mikebrooksflintlocks.com
Say, any of you boys smithies? Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?

Offline Panzerschwein

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Re: Sitting Fox Stamping?
« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2023, 02:01:53 AM »
Thanks, gang. The lock is flat faced, an L&R trade gun lock.

I think it would be best to send it to someone more experienced. Perhaps along with the stamp itself. What would be a fair price to pay for the work?

Offline smylee grouch

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Re: Sitting Fox Stamping?
« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2023, 04:23:35 AM »
Yes, Red Fox had a special accent.  ;D

Offline JTR

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Re: Sitting Fox Stamping?
« Reply #8 on: June 08, 2023, 05:24:10 AM »
Yes, Red Fox had a special accent.  ;D

That he did! :-)
John Robbins

Online Frozen Run

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Re: Sitting Fox Stamping?
« Reply #9 on: June 08, 2023, 07:41:16 AM »
Don't you need a mandrel to stamp a barrel, lest you risk dimpling the bore?

Offline Panzerschwein

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Re: Sitting Fox Stamping?
« Reply #10 on: June 08, 2023, 08:22:20 AM »
Good catch, Frozen Run.

Iím thinking just stamping the lock place will suffice.

Iím thinking I might be able to do this job myself. I am a bit nervous though. Hereís an original:



Either way Iím going to order the stamp to have it ready, plus a bottle of aqua fortis to stain some spare ramrods and maybe a tomahawk handle or two.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2023, 08:44:05 AM by Panzerschwein »

Offline Panzerschwein

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Re: Sitting Fox Stamping?
« Reply #11 on: June 08, 2023, 08:49:51 AM »
Green River Forge used the sitting fox on their tradeguns. I have two old Lott lock that they removed the Lott signature and added the sitting fox. One is acid etched, and the other is engraved. Stamping a lock plate is tricky at best.
 As the red fox being your spirit animal, you do realize the red fox is an introduced species to America not native.

Hungry Horse

Hungry, I actually realized this whilst living in Germany. I was walking on a path one night and a small red fox appeared and gently sat. We locked eyes and I felt a spiritual calm very difficult to describe.

Anyway, here is my lock plate that I plan to add the sitting fox symbol to:



As you can see itís quite flat. Iím hoping I can accomplish it properly. Iíll use the huge bench vise at work as an anvil and will practice on scrap mild steel.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2023, 08:55:36 AM by Panzerschwein »

Offline Hudnut

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Re: Sitting Fox Stamping?
« Reply #12 on: June 09, 2023, 11:27:26 PM »
Here are photos of a lock with cast in tombstone fox, an unmarked lock, and one stamped with a circle fox and Barnett.
The circle fox and the name were stamped using a press.  I found it just about impossible to get a usable impression hand striking with a hammer.  The plates were mild steel.  Be very careful stamping something like a lightweight trade gun barrel.  A dimpled bore could result.  NorthStar barrels were stamped over the breech plug.  Good idea - the barrel wall is well supported.







Offline Mike Brooks

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Re: Sitting Fox Stamping?
« Reply #13 on: June 10, 2023, 12:45:55 AM »
If you stamp a barrel over the breech plug threads you knock it out of round. With the plug in or out it doesn't matter. Look at originals, they are done just ahead of the plug.
NEW WEBSITE! www.mikebrooksflintlocks.com
Say, any of you boys smithies? Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?

Offline Panzerschwein

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Re: Sitting Fox Stamping?
« Reply #14 on: June 10, 2023, 05:54:12 PM »
Here are photos of a lock with cast in tombstone fox, an unmarked lock, and one stamped with a circle fox and Barnett.
The circle fox and the name were stamped using a press.  I found it just about impossible to get a usable impression hand striking with a hammer.  The plates were mild steel.  Be very careful stamping something like a lightweight trade gun barrel.  A dimpled bore could result.  NorthStar barrels were stamped over the breech plug.  Good idea - the barrel wall is well supported.







Thank you. Do you mean something like a hydraulic press? We have one of those at workÖ

Iím going to leave the barrel as is and just tackle the lock.

Online davec2

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Re: Sitting Fox Stamping?
« Reply #15 on: June 13, 2023, 04:06:46 PM »
I do a lot of stamping but there are circumstances when I know the hammer method does not work well for me.....so I built this.....

https://americanlongrifles.org/forum/index.php?topic=1138.msg11556#msg11556
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