Author Topic: Hammer repair  (Read 809 times)

Offline Mattox Forge

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Hammer repair
« on: June 07, 2023, 11:30:18 PM »
I have a hammer in need of repair. What are some ideas on the best way to go about it.





Thanks,
Mike

Offline rich pierce

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Re: Hammer repair
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2023, 01:48:02 AM »
One period repair would be to braze it, possibly with that area of break enlarged by filing and a wedge of iron fitted then brazed in place. Of course replacement was often done.
Andover, Vermont

Offline LynnC

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Re: Hammer repair
« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2023, 02:28:29 AM »
Thanks for the Restoration 101 lesson JTR as it is really appreciated. I never would have thought to use bailing wire as a close composition match to the old original metal. I suspect a coat hanger would have similar qualities.

As always, Im here to learn.
The price of eggs got so darn high, I bought chickens......

Online Hungry Horse

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Re: Hammer repair
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2023, 02:30:06 AM »
 This looks like you will be repairing an old repair so you won’t know what you’re working on or what time frame the old repair was done. If you’re going to make it functional with any degree of reliability, you should replace the cock.

Hungry Horse

Offline WESTbury

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Re: Hammer repair
« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2023, 04:58:49 AM »
Mike,

Is this cock an old original?

Kent
"We are not about to send American Boys 9 to 10 thousand miles away from home to do what Asian Boys ought to be doing for themselves."
President Lyndon B. Johnson October 21, 1964

Offline Mattox Forge

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Re: Hammer repair
« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2023, 06:21:58 AM »
All,

Thanks for the insights. I think I'll make a replacement.

Kent,
Yes. This cock is an original that is on a Nock Cobham Yeomanry Cavalry carbine I won in the recent Poulin auction.

Mike
« Last Edit: June 08, 2023, 02:20:50 PM by Mattox Forge »

Offline WESTbury

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Re: Hammer repair
« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2023, 03:06:40 PM »
Kent,
Yes. This cock is an original that is on a Nock Cobham Yeomanry Cavalry carbine I won in the recent Poulin auction.
Mike

Mike,

I looked at your new addition on Poulin's website. The carbine looks to be all original and in great condition. I agree with you that making a new cock is the best approach.
 
Although, I'm kind of psychotic about leaving these old military arms alone, especially a nice original like this carbine. Were it mine, I would leave the damaged cock alone and not replace it.

As you know, these original condition antique military arms lose their collector value if "fudged". They are not Longrifles which can be restored, in some cases in major ways like the worshipped Albrecht rifle and keep their collector value.

What are your thoughts on the "C/YC" on the Guardbow?

Kent
 
"We are not about to send American Boys 9 to 10 thousand miles away from home to do what Asian Boys ought to be doing for themselves."
President Lyndon B. Johnson October 21, 1964

Offline snapper

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Re: Hammer repair
« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2023, 03:43:06 PM »
i had a hammer repaired on a Rigby a few years ago. After a bit of use, the hammer started to crack again.  I had it welded up again and I also was able to find a replacement hammer that was made from casting of a similar Rigby hammer.   I use the rifle with the replacement hammer, and no one knows the difference.   In the gun safe is the original hammer in a little baggie with a note of what rifle it belongs to so if my wife/kids are selling off my toys they will know what the original hammer is.


Fleener

My taste are simple:  I am easily satisfied with the best.  Winston Churchill

Offline Mattox Forge

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Re: Hammer repair
« Reply #8 on: June 08, 2023, 03:57:46 PM »
Kent,

The main reason for me deciding to make new cock is to avoid messing with the original. The input I got is excellent, however an repair, no matter how well done, is a permanent irevocable change. I did have to repair some cracks in the forearm that I suspect were caused by stock shrinkage.

I think the main reason I will make a replacement is because the cock is easy to take off and put back on. I will probably make the whole assembly and keep the entire original assembly intact. A new cock will allow the lock to function properly with out being further damaged.

I would like to shoot this rifle, as it should give me a good idea of the accuracy of this class of rifle. It has an interesting bore configuration in the the muzzle is smooth bored for 3.75 inches before the rifling starts.

The C/YC is the marking for the Cobham Yeomanry Cavalry, which was a volunteer cavalry unit raised in the 1790s by the Earl of Darnley. The Earl bought rifled carbines from Nock in 1799. This particular rifle was sold off when the Earl of Darnley sold Cobam Hall in 1957. There are 4 of these carbines I have come across evidence of. The gun is very similar to the 1796 Heavy Dragoon carbine that Nock designed and are very similar to the original configuration of the screwless lock rifled carbine version that the London & Westminster Light Horse Volunteers contracted from him for their rifle unit.

Mike

Offline Mattox Forge

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Re: Hammer repair
« Reply #9 on: June 08, 2023, 03:59:24 PM »
i had a hammer repaired on a Rigby a few years ago. After a bit of use, the hammer started to crack again.  I had it welded up again and I also was able to find a replacement hammer that was made from casting of a similar Rigby hammer.   I use the rifle with the replacement hammer, and no one knows the difference.   In the gun safe is the original hammer in a little baggie with a note of what rifle it belongs to so if my wife/kids are selling off my toys they will know what the original hammer is.


Fleener

I suspect I would be in the same boat if I repair it.

Mike

Offline WESTbury

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Re: Hammer repair
« Reply #10 on: June 08, 2023, 05:23:37 PM »

The C/YC is the marking for the Cobham Yeomanry Cavalry, which was a volunteer cavalry unit raised in the 1790s by the Earl of Darnley. The Earl bought rifled carbines from Nock in 1799. This particular rifle was sold off when the Earl of Darnley sold Cobam Hall in 1957. There are 4 of these carbines I have come across evidence of. The gun is very similar to the 1796 Heavy Dragoon carbine that Nock designed and are very similar to the original configuration of the screwless lock rifled carbine version that the London & Westminster Light Horse Volunteers contracted from him for their rifle unit.

Mike

Mike,
Sounds like you have a good plan. I'm glad to hear that the original cock can be dismounted easily.

My question on the "YC" markings is related to a group of muskets that closely resemble the Short Land Patterns of the mid 1770's, made by Robert Watkins circa 1745 for the City of York during the Jacobite Rebellion. This is all per an article in Arms Collecting Magazine Vol. 33, No. 1 Feb 1995. I do not know if there has been further research since then. The extant Watkins muskets are branded on the left side of the buttstock "Y + C". The locks are engraved "R. Watkin". I had an opportunity to acquire one of those muskets close to 20 years ago but ended up buying a 1799 dated Springfield. I should of bought both, but unfortunately, I was born handsome not rich. ::)

Kent
"We are not about to send American Boys 9 to 10 thousand miles away from home to do what Asian Boys ought to be doing for themselves."
President Lyndon B. Johnson October 21, 1964