Author Topic: Investing in tools  (Read 3310 times)

Offline Jamie Hurley

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Investing in tools
« on: November 25, 2023, 05:42:09 PM »
I've worked as a house framer and a mechanic. I've worked with tools my whole life. But power tools in a fast and aggressive environment. I have no background with woodworking, and it's clear I need to work on precision and patience, but I also know my old chisels aren't cutting it (pun intended.)

Is there a good resource detailing the must-have tools I should be investing in?

I'm currently learning by building from kits, but would like to be moving on to building from a blank.

I already have a very good carver's vise, and a collection of pretty good files. Other than that, everything I have is probably inadequate or incorrect.

Online Stoner creek

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2023, 05:52:43 PM »
Watch some videos or the YouTube stuff. You’ll get a general idea. Tools seem to be a very personal thing. What one guy uses inlet with, I’m uncomfortable with, that type of thing. You may actually find yourself making a particular tool for a specific task.
W
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Offline JLayne

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2023, 05:57:02 PM »
I would start with some Pfeil chisels from Woodcraft. Single bevel 2mm, 4mm, and 6mm along with a good set of sharpening stones will get you through most of your kit building needs for basic inletting. You’ll want to then get some gouges with different degrees of sweep if you plane on doing carving. Also, buy the chisels individually, not as a set. That way you’ll spend only on the ones you need.

Happy building.
Jay

Online Eric Kettenburg

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2023, 06:03:21 PM »
IMHO, the old American Pioneer vids with Herschel House are impossible to beat.  Down to earth and gets right to the point.  Building these things is not a rocket science.
Strange women lying in ponds, distributing swords, is no basis for a system of government!

Offline Bob Roller

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2023, 06:54:23 PM »
Good tools are a treasure and it is rare that anyone gets too many.My interests are/were metal working and close measuring and I have
a good accumulation.I  have few wood working tools and a few rasps and two draw knives plus a set of miniature wood rasps.
On the last two rifles i made over 20 years ago those little rasps were just the "thing"for detailing around the lock mortise.
There are some world class,over the top wood workers here that can give you solid advise on ant tool in the catalogs for wood
or metal.
Bob Roller

Offline Bill Raby

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Offline JPK

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2023, 06:56:09 PM »
An Optivisor and more lights than you think you need! Close work can only be done if you can see.
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Offline Karl Kunkel

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2023, 04:51:43 AM »
From this site:

https://www.americanlongrifles.com/WorkShop_frame.htm

See "Tool List" in the left hand menu.

Kunk

Offline bptactical

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2023, 06:03:41 AM »
You can’t afford to buy cheap tools.
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Offline mikeyfirelock

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2023, 04:46:09 PM »
Some of the best tools have not been mentioned……books.   The classic is The time honored “ Recreating the American Longrifle” by Wm. Buchele.   There are several others which give a very thorough stepwise explanation of the process, but also some
Of the history and procedures the old timers used.   You can wear out tools, but knowledge never gets dull.
Mike Mullins

Offline 44-henry

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #10 on: November 26, 2023, 06:12:59 PM »
I have found some good deals at antique stores and flea markets in the area. Usually older is better when it comes to hand tools. In addition to basic chisels and gouges,  I would keep an eye out for a good vintage Stanley #5 plane, a good condition wood bodied spokeshave, and a smaller draw knife. Also, purchase any standard screwdriver you can find. These can be reground to fit  the many different screws you encounter, and in a pinch can also be sharpened to be used as tiny wood chisels. Also, if you find decent files and rasps in your hunt, these can be resharpened by Boggs at a very reasonable price.

Online Daryl

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #11 on: November 26, 2023, 06:58:23 PM »
I had 3 chisels, seems to me. One I made from a screw driver. The results were not stellar. That was in the 70's. I've not done such a thing since,
except for modern stuff. Built a bunch of those, that's easy. I only need the two chisels for those.(just kidding.
 I have a cheap set, most of which have never been used.
Daryl

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Offline J. Talbert

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #12 on: November 26, 2023, 08:08:50 PM »
You mention your old chisels aren’t getting the job done.
Don’t underestimate the importance of sharpening.  Sharpening for carving will require a much finer edge than you are likely used to in your carpentry back round.

Jeff
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Offline Bob Roller

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #13 on: November 26, 2023, 08:37:03 PM »
An Optivisor and more lights than you think you need! Close work can only be done if you can see.

I installed LED tubes and then decided to stop working in the shop (or anywhere else) :)
Bob Roller.

Offline Hungry Horse

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #14 on: November 26, 2023, 10:24:13 PM »
 I got my workbench from Harbor Freight. It’s their wood working bench, and it works fine. I also bought a bench light there that swivels,has a magnifier, and clamps right to the bench top.
 I couldn’t agree more about getting Hershel’s videos they really show you how few tools it takes to make a quality rifle. Remember this is building an old time rifle, not a remake of tool time. You’ll get plenty of opportunities to spend money when you start buying quality parts. Good luck.

Hungry Horse

Offline JasonR

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #15 on: November 27, 2023, 01:58:36 AM »
1) solid work bench anchored in wall/floor with island to work around
2) good lighting/magnification
3) good chiropractor

To your hand tool question...you'll learn fast what hand tools do and dont suit you. It is wise to buy individually and avoid cheap steel. Perhaps trying others' gouges, chisels, or planes before you commit.

Offline BOB HILL

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #16 on: November 27, 2023, 07:10:50 AM »
Books aren’t over rated for sure. Many of us on here started building long before the internet. It is a great tool today.   Buchele’s “Recreating the American longrifle” and Dixon’s “ Building the Pa . Longrifle” will answer many of the questions often asked on this forum.
 Bob
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Offline Bsharp

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #17 on: November 27, 2023, 07:17:24 AM »
Quality and price of a tool can be based upon your age and how much you will use it.

The younger that you are, the more you should spend.
Get Close and Wack'em Hard!

Offline Bill Raby

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #18 on: November 27, 2023, 08:01:31 AM »
Quality and price of a tool can be based upon your age and how much you will use it.

The younger that you are, the more you should spend.

I disagree!The older I get the more I realize how much cheap tools are a waste of time. As you get short on time it becomes even more important to enjoy using the tools instead of just getting the job done.

Offline BOB HILL

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #19 on: November 27, 2023, 08:17:46 AM »
An older friend, many years ago told me that the shame about good tools was that by the time he could buy the ones he had always wanted, he was too old to use them. The older I get the more I realize what he meant.
South Carolina Lowcountry

Offline M. E. Pering

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #20 on: November 27, 2023, 08:45:20 AM »
It is great to have quality tools, and lots of them.  But as others have mentioned, it isn't always necessary.  For instance, today, I do the majority of my barrel inletting with an inexpensive Irwin 1/4" chisel that cost around $14 at my local Menards, IIRC.  I do also have a few chisels that are of higher quality, but they are more specialized, and certainly don't remove as much wood as that Irwin.  I have a couple of gouges of differing sweeps, and a straight dog-leg chisel I use for lock inletting.  I have a couple very small chisel that I made myself for detail carving, and a couple made by Dock Yard Models that work well for me.  I am not a production shop, so I don't need the exact chisel for that exact cut.

Most importantly, is keeping the chisels you do have razor sharp, and knowing how to use them.  All of my chisels are mirror polished, and of shaving quality.  If I had to guess, I think I could make an entire plain rifle with only a few chisels.  But if they aren't razor sharp, then my task will be much harder.  Sharpen well, and sharpen often.

Offline Beaverman

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #21 on: November 27, 2023, 09:23:37 AM »
An older friend, many years ago told me that the shame about good tools was that by the time he could buy the ones he had always wanted, he was too old to use them. The older I get the more I realize what he meant.

AMEN!

Offline alacran

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #22 on: November 27, 2023, 12:53:16 PM »
When you look at inventories of deceased gunsmiths from the 18th century. I find it amazing how very few tools they had.
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Offline Cory Joe Stewart

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #23 on: November 27, 2023, 05:12:18 PM »
You may also be able to work with what tools you have.  It could be that the chisels you have just need some tlc depending on their condition. 

Cory Joe

Offline Mike Brooks

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Re: Investing in tools
« Reply #24 on: November 27, 2023, 05:36:31 PM »
I made a fulltime living making flintlock rifles with very few tools. Don't go crazy think more tools are going to make your work better.
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Say, any of you boys smithies? Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?