Author Topic: 32 caliber cleaning...how tough is it?  (Read 4371 times)

Offline Skychief

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 650
32 caliber cleaning...how tough is it?
« on: March 27, 2010, 04:30:38 AM »
I am considering building/buying a 32 caliber for a squirrel rifle.   I hear from time to time that they are hard to clean.   I have a 36 caliber that is harder to clean than my 45s and 50s, yet, I don't consider it that challenging to clean.

My friend has a 29 and reports that it is a bear to clean.   So, what about the 32's?  I don't want to build a rifle only to find that it's maintenance takes away from its fun.   

What say you about cleaning the 32 caliber bores?   Many thanks for your experiences!

Black Jaque Janaviac

  • Guest
Re: 32 caliber cleaning...how tough is it?
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2010, 05:32:55 AM »
I've owned a .32 in the past, a Pedersoli, and it was not difficult to clean.

I currently own one but haven't gotten to dirty it yet.  Tomorrow I'll report to the board.

The only thing about a .32 is that the 5/16" ramrod fits so snugly that there is no room to use a muzzle cone.  Of course the .32 is so cheap and fun to shoot you'll shoot it often.  Which means cleaning often.  Which means there is a realistic chance of wearing out the muzzle.

But, you can always use a 1/4" brass rod for cleaning purposes.

ol vern

  • Guest
Re: 32 caliber cleaning...how tough is it?
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2010, 05:53:18 AM »
My 32 isn't much harder to clean than my 50.

I use a 22cal jag on a one peice stainless steel rod
plug the vent with a toothpick pour some windex  down the barrel
let it soak for a few minutes while I clean the lock then blast the windex out the
touch hole with a tight patch on my cleaning rod. Follow that up with some wd40
and I am good to go.

Offline wvmtnman

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 546
Re: 32 caliber cleaning...how tough is it?
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2010, 06:01:50 AM »
Having the proper equipment is key to cleaning any muzzleloader.  When cleaning small (and large)bore rifles I use a 1/4 inch steel cleaning rod with a bore guide.  It is 44 inches in length and has a handle that will rotate.   Proper size and type cleaning jage and cleaning patches are also important.  I have never experienced and dificulty using that set up.
                                                                            Brian
B. Lakatos

ironsights1

  • Guest
Re: 32 caliber cleaning...how tough is it?
« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2010, 05:08:51 PM »
I've got a .25, .29, .30, and .32 and find they are no harder to clean than my larger bores. After shooting or hunting, I wet a patch with a cleaning solution, even spit, and run it down the bore to start the cleaning process. When I get home, I use cold water with just a drop or two of Dawn dishwashing liquid in the solution to finish up. Usually, 4-5 more patches will finish cleaning the bore. I use WD-40 after that and then RIG if I don't plan to use it for a while. I clean my rifles upside down in a cradle with the stock end higher than the muzzle. This allows any water to run out the bore plus any water exiting the flash hole will run down the barrel and drip off the muzzle or front sight rather than back under the stock. With my .25, I've gone to a brass ramrod for shooting and cleaning since wood is too small at this diameter and can easily break with too much pressure on it. I use either a brass or steel rod with bore guides to clean all of my muzzleloaders.

Daryl

  • Guest
Re: 32 caliber cleaning...how tough is it?
« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2010, 05:11:04 PM »
I also have a .32. It's cleaning regime is the same as all my other guns and it's just as easy.  It just needs a smaller jag and smaller patches.  That's the only difference.

eagle24

  • Guest
Re: 32 caliber cleaning...how tough is it?
« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2010, 06:59:06 PM »
Mine is no different than cleaning my .50's.  I do have to use smaller patches though. :D

northmn

  • Guest
Re: 32 caliber cleaning...how tough is it?
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2010, 01:43:43 AM »
Agree with those saying its no harder to clean.  My 25 also cleans as easy as a 45.

DP

Daryl

  • Guest
Re: 32 caliber cleaning...how tough is it?
« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2010, 07:05:44 AM »
Some time ago, someone mentioned about the little ones, the 28's, .30's and .32's fouling more than the bigger guns, ie: haivng trouble loading due to fouling buildup.  It could be people having this problem, are having trouble cleaning due to excessive fouling they seem to be getting.
Personally, I find the .32 the easiest to load (least amount of pressure) of all my guns.  this might be due to the wide lands and narrow grooves.  The narrow grooves seem to allow a thinner patch than my guns with wider grooves.

Offline trentOH

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 591
Re: 32 caliber cleaning...how tough is it?
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2010, 04:16:23 AM »
A small funnel will come in REAL handy when trying to pour water or windex or whatever through that incredibly tiny hole when you start to clean her.  Or to load her if you try a powder measure designed to feed a 50 caliber.

Daryl

  • Guest
Re: 32 caliber cleaning...how tough is it?
« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2010, 05:27:17 PM »
About powder measures - I've found, in test-weighing thrown charges, the smaller the measure's inside diameter, the more consistant the charge thrown.  With 3/8" inside diameter, even 100gr. charges for large bores can be thrown or stricken that vary no more than 1/2gr. 

The little calibres also add the problem of a small hole in the bore to pour the powder into and the more consistant the charge thrown, the more consistantly they hold accuracy - in a graduated degree, that is, as mentioned on the other small bore thread. 

The smaller the bore, the more exact everything must be to maintain accuracy.  Perfection in the ball cast and consistancy in the material used for patching.  What this means, is a .50 or .54 might allow powder charges to vary 1 to 3gr. & very small defects in the ball yet still cut small groups, whereas a smaller calibre gun, like a .30 or .32 will not reward you with such slopiness.

For my .32 powder measure, I use 5/16" tubing, or trimmed down (lathe) .223 cases along with a reduced diameter pouring spout on the horn.  The small hole makes pouring the powder charge into the small measure more exacting along with hitting the small bore with the charge an easier task.  Due to my rifle preferring 35gr., the turned .223 case is too small, ie; too low in capacity, so I use brass tubing with a wooden plug in one end for a measure.  They are very easy to make and very consistant in thrown charges.

Offline hanshi

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5314
  • My passion is longrifles!
    • martialartsusa.com
Re: 32 caliber cleaning...how tough is it?
« Reply #11 on: March 29, 2010, 08:01:21 PM »
Small bores, .32 & .36, are no harder to clean than a .50 or .54.  You'll need a small funnel if you pour a liquid into the tiny bores but that's about it.

I have a Remington "Friendship" flask I bought back about 1967 and have several spouts for it.  The 20 grain and the 30 grain spouts seldom vary much more than about 1/2 grain + or -.   I pour this into an antler measure made for the rifles.  This gives very consistent velocities.
!Jozai Senjo! "always present on the battlefield"
Young guys should hang out with old guys; old guys know stuff.