Author Topic: Augustine, S. 100810-1  (Read 6020 times)

Offline nord

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Augustine, S. 100810-1
« on: August 20, 2010, 03:42:22 PM »
A tiger stripe maple full stock percussion long rifle signed by Southeast Ohio gun maker Samuel Augustine (1815 1894). Samuel was active as a gunsmith and farmer near Athens, Ohio from 1838 through the 1880s. His most active period of manufacture was probably in the 1840s-60s. There is an excellent biography of him written by his gg-grandson located at the Association of Ohio Long Rifle Collectors Association web site (https://www.aolrc.org/home/ ) .

This rifle has the following dimensions:

Total Length: 56.5 in.
Barrel length: 40 in.
Weight: 10 lbs.
Caliber: .36
Length of Pull: 14 in.
Drop at heel: 4.0 in.

Straight barrel / No swamp: .9 in

Barrel flats: .5 in

 

As you can see the lock, which I believe to be original to this gun, is converted from flint. Its possible that the gun was originally flintlock however I believe that the rifle was always percussion and that the lock was converted before ever being used.

She does appear to have some more southerly features. The trigger guard would seem to reflect some Louisville Kentucky influence and the barrel tang is quite long, pointed and secured by two screws.






















Comments:

Though a late gun of not great artistic merit, it seems to me, a worthy addition to the Museum as a signed piece from a documented maker for all to be able to view.

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This is a great example of a low cost 'working gun', probably much like the one Annie Oakley used as a girl. There do not seem to be many examples of this maker's work around and for that reason alone it should be included in the library. The gun is well made and is somewhat like the guns made in the 'Mad River School' in Ohio. Nice rifle!

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Any signed gun, particularly if examples are limited and the gun is reasonably intact and original, is worthy of being in the museum. The long 2-screw tang and guard with a "square shoulder" above the rear spur are details often found on Louisville guns, as well as guns made on up the river that were influenced by Louisville, or their makers purchased mountings and other parts in Louisville. Good example for the museum. 
   
« Last Edit: December 02, 2019, 07:30:53 PM by Dennis Glazener »
In Memory of Lt. Catherine Hauptman Miller 6/1/21 - 10/1/00 & Capt. Raymond A. Miller 12/26/13 - 5/15/03...  They served proudly.