Author Topic: Japanese files  (Read 5584 times)

Offline Jerry V Lape

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Japanese files
« on: February 08, 2014, 12:29:05 AM »
Bought a 200mm" Iwasaki fine cut file from Woodcraft.  Wish I had known about these files before buying the Nicholson 49 and 50 rasps.  Going back later today to get a half round super fine.  These are really interesting.  Tooth pattern is different and they are super aggressive in that you don't apply any significant pressure on them to cut.  If you try to apply pressure the file just stalls.   I was cutting the end grain for the butt plate in a piece of very curly sugar maple.  Not a problem, takes it off nice and easy.  The Nicholsens kind of chew at it by comparison.  I hope the promise they show works out on the rest of the stock as well.  Going with the grain it was cutting nice clean surface.  They come in medium cut, fine and superfine.  

Anyone else tried these and know how they wear?
« Last Edit: February 08, 2014, 07:26:21 AM by Jerry V Lape »

Offline gwill

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Re: Japanese files
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2014, 01:25:33 AM »
I agree with your comments - I've used these files on a couple of builds and really like them.  Much better than the Nicolson rasps I started with. 

Offline Acer Saccharum

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Re: Japanese files
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2014, 01:43:47 AM »
It's good to hear of another tool that works well.

here is previous discussion about rasps: http://americanlongrifles.org/forum/index.php?topic=27762.0
Tom Curran's web site : http://monstermachineshop.net
Ramrod scrapers are all sold out.

Thom

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Re: Japanese files
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2014, 02:44:43 AM »
You don't mean Iwasaki?

Offline PPatch

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Re: Japanese files
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2014, 02:53:55 AM »
The 10 inch flat and half-round Iwasaki are my go-to files for rapid hardwood removal / shaping. They cut fast with not a lot of effort and they cut smooth. Great rasps.

dp
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Okefinokee Outlaw

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Re: Japanese files
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2014, 03:22:41 AM »
I'm looking in the Woodcraft catalog and see the Iwasaki carving files in lengths up to 200mm(almost 8") in medium, fine, and extra fine.  I also see what they call cabinet files in a 10"  length in bastard cut, flat and half round, 8" round in fine cut, and 6" half round in fine cut.  Which of these files are being discussed?

Offline sdilts

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Re: Japanese files
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2014, 04:41:15 AM »
I have the 8" and 10" as well as the half round. I've built 3 rifles with these and am really impressed with the way they cut - fast and smooth without chipping. The half round is really good for cutting out the buttplate profile.

Thom

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Re: Japanese files
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2014, 04:56:02 AM »
Most people do not realise that the Japanese make some of the finest woodworking tools and kitchen cutlery in the world. Handsaws and cutlery are produced, maintained, and used much differently than we are used to in the west.

Offline Clark Badgett

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Re: Japanese files
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2014, 06:18:32 AM »
Most people do not realise that the Japanese make some of the finest woodworking tools and kitchen cutlery in the world. Handsaws and cutlery are produced, maintained, and used much differently than we are used to in the west.

Thom is correct. The Japanese know how to work metals. I have a set of their hand forged chisels that refuse to get dull.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2014, 07:09:55 PM by Clark B »
Psalms 144

Offline Jerry V Lape

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Re: Japanese files
« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2014, 07:24:32 AM »
Thom, yes I mean Iwasaki.  The one I bought is the 200mm flat fine. 

Offline Habu

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Re: Japanese files
« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2014, 10:17:50 PM »
Anyone else tried these and know how they wear?

I had one in the kit of tools I took to jobsites for cabinet installs.  Cutting oak/cherry/walnut (and the occasional maple ply), it lasted for 2 years before I left that job and gave the rasp to one of my co-workers.  A few years later, he was still using it.  Just remember to protect  the teeth from other hardened tools, and don't loan it to idiots who think a rasp is intended to cut metal.  (That may just be a cabinet shop problem.)