Author Topic: The "Great Pacific North West" rasp-off (A test of French hand stitched rasps)  (Read 9064 times)

Offline David Rase

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It finally happened.  The 2014 Oregon Gunmakers Fair has come and went.  With that said I must report on the results of the French hand stitched rasp-off.  Not to be outdone, we had not one but 7 hand stitched rasps in the lineup.  They consisted of an Auriou #5 and #10, and Liogier rasps in #12, 8, 7, 4 and the covenanted 49 prototype.   

Since the original objective was to test drive the #49 prototype, we lead off with that rasp.  The first thing the group of volunteers noticed was how sharp the tool is.  My God, that thing is scary sharp.  While rasping on a stock blank of sugar maple the general conscientious was that if you tried to remove wood with the same amount of pressure that you would apply to the venerable Nicholson #49 rasp, the Liogier would stall out.  Heaven forbid if your forward hand keep moving when the rasp dug in.  In other words, there was a learning curve to using this rasp.  Once one learned to use a lighter touch, the rasp performed as designed.  You can remove the same amount of material with the Liogier as with the Nicholson but with a lot less effort.  One note of reference, most of our users felt that the #49 Liogier prototype was one stitch too course when compared to the Nicholson. 

We noted no difference in using either the Sapphire line, which we had 2 of, or the standard finish.  The #10 Auriou was a very desirable stitch for finishing a surface.  You could go directly to a scraper after using the #10.

The overall favorite was the #7 stitched Modellers rasp.  Most felt that this rasp was a lot easier to use.  Due to its narrower design, our operators felt less resistance and more control.  Being narrower also made the rasp more versatile. 

From top to bottom:
Liogier #12
Auriou #10
Liogier #8
Liogier #7 The hands down favorite
Auriou #5
Liogier #4
Liogier #49

David



« Last Edit: July 25, 2017, 02:49:24 AM by David Rase »

Offline Kermit

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Re: The "Great Pacific North West" rasp comparison
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2014, 11:35:38 PM »
You folks have done quite a service for us wood butchers out here. Thanks. Looking forward to your pix.
"Anything worth doing is worth doing slowly." Mae West

kaintuck

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Re: The "Great Pacific North West" rasp comparison
« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2014, 03:05:07 AM »
Yes, thank you...I intend to purchase a couple of these fine tools.....just don't know which one...as they are expensive tools!!!!...I can only get one for now!
Looking forward for more info, and pictures...
Marc

Offline Ky-Flinter

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Wow! Dave, you all finished off the traveling rasp review in fine fashion.  Good job!

This was the final review of the Liogier Prototype 49 rasp.  Here's a link to the odyssey of reviews that preceded the "Great Pacific North West" rasp-off.

http://americanlongrifles.org/forum/index.php?topic=30280.0

-Ron
Ron Winfield

Life is too short to hunt with an ugly gun. -Nate McKenzie

Offline stoneke

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Let me say, as one of the Great Pacific North West participants, that the Liogier #7 is a true gem in the world of rasps. It is useful in tighter areas, as well as working larger areas. The added length is quite useful in its use. I plan to buy one.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2014, 03:52:12 AM by stoneke »

Offline Acer Saccharum

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The long narrow is my preference, too.

If you don't like your fingers getting torn up on your left hand, wear a glove, grind the teeth off, or tape it up.

I hate it when the rasp suddenly stops and your hand keeps moving.  ;D
Tom Curran's web site : http://monstermachineshop.net
Ramrod scrapers are all sold out.

Offline Jim Kibler

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Interesting that the modellers rasp was the favorite.  I have a smaller Auriou modellers rasp and while I sometimes use it, I much prefer a full size cabinet rasp.  My thoughts are that it's best to use as big of a tool that can practically be used for an operation.  Wider surfaces yield flatter finished surfaces etc.  Along those lines is the approach to use as flat of a radius as possible when working a contour.  Bigger tools tend to perform an operation quicker as well.  All this is just my preference now of course.  Might have to try one of these sometime since it has such a good feel to so many.

Offline Acer Saccharum

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I use a tool similar to #4, the long half-round coarse tool for shaping, an Ariou #5 finer tooth for finishing, and a couple of smaller tools for detail shaping, 6" half-rounds.

A fine tooth rasp saves me a lot of work, as I can go right to scraping after rasping.


Tom


Tom Curran's web site : http://monstermachineshop.net
Ramrod scrapers are all sold out.

Offline Acer Saccharum

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Ah, and a coarse tooth rasp removes a lot of wood, but it also does considerable tearing of the grain, so it's a good plan to switch to a finer rasp to remove the tearing.

A dull rasp requires considerable pressure to cut, and it also compresses the wood, which can show up when you raise the grain. Another reason to switch to finer finishing rasps before scraping.
Tom Curran's web site : http://monstermachineshop.net
Ramrod scrapers are all sold out.

SuperCracker

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I love my Liogier rasps. I have the Gunsmiths and a modelers in a 7 (I think). I also have a big #3.  That thing goes through hard maple like it was styrofoam. It will also do that to the palm of your hand. Gloves are a must, those things are SHARP!

Offline Dphariss

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Good test Dave. Thanks.

Dan
He who dares not offend cannot be honest. Thomas Paine