Author Topic: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox  (Read 25633 times)

Offline David Rase

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Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« on: September 05, 2015, 02:49:51 AM »
Since I need to make the patchbox for the rifle I am currently commissioned to build, I thought I would try and document the process.  The box I decide on is a captured lid box with a hidden hinge.  The box design was inspired from an original Jaeger sliding wooden box with a decorative surround that just screamed metal box surround to me.  The mechanics of the box come from an original cast brass box.  Unique to this box is that it is self contained.  The springs and the release are all mounted to the box.  Anyway, here goes.  Hope you enjoy.
David


This first picture is the pattern.  I normally draw a pattern on a sheet of copy paper then I glue it to my sheet of brass or steel using regular old carpenters glue.  The steel I chose for this box has a thickness of .047" (18 gage).


Once the pattern has been cut out, I form the patchbox to the contour of the stock.  This is a time consuming step that is essential to avoid low and high spots after inletting.  If the patchbox does not match the contour of the stock you risk having thin spots when you file and sand the patchbox flush with the stock.  Now is the time to clean up and draft the edges with a file.  Once the prep work is completed, I locate and drill the holes in the patchbox for the wood screws.  I then transfer the hole locations to the stock and  lightly center punch them.   For this box I used 1/2" x 5 flat head wood screws.


This is an end view of the curve in the patchbox.  Notice that the curve is smooth with no humps, bends or ridges.  You should strive for smooth bends and contours.  This will aid in maintaining even thickness during the final filing, sanding and polishing.


This picture shows the use of the gimlet for drilling pilot holes.  I prefer using gimlets to twist drills because I can make corrections as I am drilling to ensure the pilot hole is perpendicular to the surface of the gunstock.


With the patchbox screwed into place, I trace around the inside and outside perimeter of the box with a sharp pencil.  At this time I also start to remove some of the bulk wood where the patchbox cavity will be.  I use a 1" drill  and drill each of the 3 holes to final depth in 1/4" deep increments.  Drilling in increments helps to keep the drill bit from grabbing at the overlap.


This is the tool I use to ensure the inlet follows the contour of the buttstock.  Using a 1/16" drill with a drill stop, I set the drill depth to the thickness of the patchbox.


Using the drill and drill stop, I pepper the area to be inlet with 1/16" holes .047" deep.  These holes will be used during wood removal to ensure that the inlet follows the contour of the stock. Once I have peppered the area with holes, I erase the pencil lines and reinstall the patchbox.  Next I lightly trace around the outside of the patchbox with a sharp X-acto knife to mark the exterior of the inlet.  I then remove the patchbox and  remove all the wood inside the scribed lines.  I continue deepening the inlet until I have reached the bottom of the drilled holes.       


This picture shows the completed inlet.  As you can see, all the holes I previously drilled have disappeared and the inlet follows the stock profile perfectly.


At this time I clean up the patchbox cavity.  I leave about 1/16" of wood around the patchbox for the lid to rest on.  More wood will have to be removed later on for the hinges, springs and door catch.






These 3 photos show the patchbox lid.  The lid curve matches the patchbox.  The front of the lid and the mating surface have a 45 degree bevel filed on both pieces. The other 3 sides of the lid have a slight draft filed in them.


This is a picture of the hinge assembly.  The hinges were bent from the same 18 gage mild steel as the box  surround and lid.  I made a 90 degree bend in a 2"long x 5/8" wide strip of steel.  I then laid out the locations for and drilled the hinge pin and rivet holes.   I drilled these holes prior to cutting off the individual pieces so I had a bigger piece of material to hold.  The individual hinges are approximately 3/8" wide by 5/16" tall.  After tinning the joints, I soft soldered the hinges to the door first ensuring the hinge  was perpendicular to the edge of the lid.  I then positioned and clamped the door to the box.  I slid the hinge pin through the lid hinges and slid the box hinges over the hinge pin.  Due to the curve of the box and lid, I had to tweak the 90 degree hinge bends to get a good alignment for the hinge pin and a tight solder joint.  The 2 hinges were then soldered to the patchbox.  With all 4 hinges secure with no fear of losing alignment, I was able to complete drilling and riveting the hinges to the patchbox and patchbox lid.  After countering the holes, I filed the round holes square, leaving the outside diameter of the countersink round.  After making some square pins up for the rivets, I riveted the hinges to the box and lid and filed them flush.  The reason for using square stock was for added security in maintaining alignment of the hinges should the soft solder joint fail.  With the hinge assembly complete, my next step was to provide clearance for the hinges and lid in the stock.


This is a picture of all the components used in making this captured lid hidden hinged patchbox.  A total of  18 individual pieces were required to be made for this project.


A picture of the underside of the assembled patchbox unit.  The springs were made from 1084 steel.  Since I do not make a lot of springs, I like using 1084.  It is very forgiving compared to 1095.  Screws are made from 12L14 round stock.  The thread pitch is 5-40. 


A picture of the completed inlet.


The completed patchbox assembly in the gun.  A bit more polishing and adjusting the depth of the countersinks and this patchox is done.








« Last Edit: May 22, 2018, 10:08:15 PM by David Rase »

Offline Whetrock (PLB)

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2015, 03:06:30 AM »

Great tutorial, Dave! We all appreciate the hard work that you put into making this!
Whet

Offline acorn20

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2015, 03:35:08 AM »
Dave, Fantastic job on the patchbox and tutorial.  The simplistic design of this patchbox really strikes my fancy.  It looks quite fitting for a Jaeger. I like it!
Dan Akers

Offline Nate McKenzie

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2015, 03:39:11 AM »
Beautiful work and fantastic pictures. Great tutorial. Thanks, Dave.

Offline Acer Saccharum

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2015, 03:50:31 AM »
Love your work, Dave, and this is no exception!

May I move this to tutorial section after a while? This is a keeper.
Tom Curran's web site : http://monstermachineshop.net
Ramrod scrapers are all sold out.

Offline Curtis

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2015, 06:01:40 AM »
Very nice tutorial Dave!  Great job on the patch box as well!  Thanks for posting it.

Curtis
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Offline Willbarq

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2015, 09:17:16 AM »
Super nice tutorial, Thank you.

Offline Rolf

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2015, 03:14:56 PM »
Great tutorial!!! A big help for anyone making a patch box.
Thank you for taking the time.

Best regards
Rolf

Online Tim Crosby

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2015, 03:51:47 PM »
 Dave That is a Great tutorial, very well photographed and the text is very clear.
Thanks for taking the time to make it up, I know it is time consuming.
 Reminds me of the earlier days of the ALR.

  Tim C.
    
« Last Edit: September 05, 2015, 09:10:48 PM by Tim Crosby »

Offline t.caster

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2015, 05:28:45 PM »
Great tutorial all right! This will come in handy on a future build, I am sure ;)
I am thinking about a captured lid box on the Bethabara (RCA#42) rifle, similar to other N.C. patchboxes.
Thanks!
Tom C.

Offline J. Talbert

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2015, 05:38:09 PM »
Dave,
That's some super neat work and great documentation.

Great job!  Love your work.

Jeff
There are no solutions.  There are only trade-offs.
Thomas Sowell

Offline Dennis Glazener

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2015, 05:58:21 PM »
David,
Beautiful work and I want to thank you for the extra time you spent documenting your work. Most people aren't aware how much time it takes to document a tutorial. Also want to thank you for your willingness to share your knowledge with others, it means a lot to new builders and us old timers as well. I love the drill stop you made and its use here is so obvious (at least it is now that we have seen it!).
Dennis
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Offline Bob Roller

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2015, 06:18:53 PM »
Here is something I have never seen posted on any forum written by W.Foster.I don't know if this person was/is a man or a woman but it makes no difference and I think it goes with this tutorial on the patch box.

                                                  QUALITY
 QUALITY IS NEVER ACCIDENTAL, IT IS ALWAYS THE RESULT OF HIGH INTENTION,SINCERE EFFORT, INTELLIGENT DIRECTION AND SKILLFUL EXECUTION.  IT REPRESENTS THE WISEST CHOICE OF MANY ALTERNATIVES; THE CUMULATIVE EXPERIENCE OF MANY MASTERS OF CRAFTSMANSHIP.  QUALITY ALSO MARKS THE SEARCH FOR THE IDEAL AFTER MERE NECESSITY HAS BEEN SATISFIED AND MERE USEFULNESS ACHIEVED.

Years ago I quoted this to a knucklehead that wanted me to give him a dealers price on a lock and he acted as if
it was something from Bob Hope or Red Skelton and thought it was funny. I also told him I didn't pay anyone to buy this stuff and was too busy with Europeans to consider it.

Bob Roller

« Last Edit: September 05, 2015, 06:44:42 PM by Ky-Flinter »

Offline P.W.Berkuta

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #13 on: September 05, 2015, 07:00:49 PM »
VERY nicely done Dave, great tutorial and I like your attention to the detials. Your workmanship is first rate ;).
"The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person who is doing it." - Chinese proverb

Offline wpalongrifle

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #14 on: September 05, 2015, 07:14:33 PM »
Great Job, David!!! I've used the depth stop method for inletting patchbox for years. i like the engraved letters.

mike karkalla
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Offline BOB HILL

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #15 on: September 05, 2015, 10:06:24 PM »
Very Weilldone, both the box and tutorial. I'm sure it will be used and appreciated long after we are gone. Thanks Dave.            Bob
South Carolina Lowcountry

Offline PPatch

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #16 on: September 06, 2015, 02:07:19 AM »
Your fine craftsmanship, your explanations and documentation are first rate here Dave. I learned from this presentation, thank you sir!

dave
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Offline tallbear

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #17 on: September 06, 2015, 05:41:56 AM »
Great stuff Dave!!!

Mitch

Offline J. Talbert

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #18 on: September 06, 2015, 11:31:09 PM »
Dave, 
I like your depth stop, but another method that I have used to achieve the same goal, is a twist on Gary Brumfield's method of removing the background from relief carving.

I use a small gouge such as a 3mm #9 and cut a bunch of parallel troughs in the field of the patchbox inlet.  These serve as reference cuts just as your depth holes.  I find these easy and speedy to cut, as well as removing significant waste while providing good carving practice at the same time.

Just throwing that out as alternative,  but sure can't argue with your results,   ;D

Jeff
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Thomas Sowell

Offline Robby

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #19 on: September 07, 2015, 02:04:56 AM »
I always enjoy seeing your work, now I enjoy seeing how you do it, great stuff!!!
Robby
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Offline Marcruger

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #20 on: September 07, 2015, 04:00:16 AM »
At first I didn't note the author of the topic.  Once I got to reading, I scrolled back up to see who'd made such a great tutorial.  I saw David's name and thought, "Oh.  Okay.  No wonder it is so good."   :-)  Mighty fine work on both the box and the crisp tutorial.  Many thanks,   Marc

Offline James Rogers

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #21 on: September 07, 2015, 04:19:19 AM »
The box work is highly impressive as expected of you....the tutorial is unbelievably amazing.

Offline flatsguide

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #22 on: September 07, 2015, 04:37:22 AM »
Thank you very much for taking the time to document and share your talented work. It is always nice, not only what was done, but HOW it was done.
Regards, Richard

Offline Daryl

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #23 on: September 08, 2015, 12:30:42 AM »
Great tutorial Dave.
Daryl

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Offline Swampwalker

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Re: Captured Lid Hidden Hinge Patchbox
« Reply #24 on: September 08, 2015, 05:41:45 PM »
Thanks, Dave, that was a fun tutorial.  Nice job on the springs.  I like your square rivet idea to maintain alignment.