Author Topic: George Eister  (Read 1469 times)

Offline Ezra

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George Eister
« on: July 16, 2019, 08:24:50 PM »
I have read numerous times about gunsmith George Eister on this forum.  Unanimously, all speak highly of his gun building skills.  I searched my Schumway books last night but could not find any examples of his work, or indeed, anything about the man.  Can someone here help me out?  I would very much appreciate help with the following:

Did George Eister specialize in a particular school of rifles?

Are there examples of his work somewhere that can be reviewed, whether book(s), online or museum?

Did he have particular characteristics specific to his style?

I gather from how well Mr. Eister is thought of around here that his gun building skills were considerable, on par, or close to the very best we are aware of.  I look forward to your responses.


Ez
"Rules are for the obedience of fools and guidance of wise men"

Offline rich pierce

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2019, 08:39:03 PM »
See Kindig’s book on golden age Kentuckies
St. Louis, Missouri

Offline smart dog

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2019, 09:31:07 PM »
Hi Ezra,
Eister was after the period Shumway tried to cover.  As Rich mentioned, he is well represented in Kindig's book. I believe Eister divided his time between farming and gun making.  He represents what Kindig called the York school, which included the Altlands, Zorger, Welshanz, Ernst, and others.  We have an example in our virtual library.  His rifles were beautiful and his carving was light and strongly suggested motion because of the distorted way he made volutes.  He definitely stretched the rules of the "golden mean".  I am sure some other folks here can suggest museums and other resources with Eister rifles.

dave   
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Offline Ezra

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2019, 09:33:46 PM »
Thank you Rich.  I may actually have that, have to check.

Ez
"Rules are for the obedience of fools and guidance of wise men"

Offline Shreckmeister

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Rightful liberty is unobstructed action according to our will within limits drawn around us by the equal rights of others. I do not add 'within the limits of the law' because law is often but the tyrant's will, and always so when it violates the rights of the individual.

Offline Joey R

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2019, 11:56:00 PM »
Maybe check with J. Talbert here on this forum. He built a beauty and knowing him it was thoroughly researched. Good luck.
Joey

Offline Ky-Flinter

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2019, 12:21:08 AM »
Eister's work is pictured in the books Thoughts on the Kentucky Rifle in Its Golden Age and Masterpieces of the American Longrifle; The Joe Kindig, Jr. Collection.

-Ron
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Offline Elnathan

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2019, 05:27:36 AM »
Shumway illustrates one of the same Eister pieces shown in Kindig in Longrifles of Note, also, if anyone happens to have that and not Kindig.
A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying...cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects. -Robert A. Heinlein

Offline J. Talbert

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2019, 04:38:50 AM »
You picked one of my favorites.
Here's a link to some pictures of my interpretation of Eister.

http://americanlongrifles.org/forum/index.php?topic=50468.msg500458#msg500458


Jeff

PS  Thanks Joey
"When the people find that they can vote themselves money, that will herald the end of the republic"  Benjamin Franklin

Offline Joey R

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2019, 03:33:09 PM »
You're welcome Jeff.  A fantastic rifle. Joey.
Joey

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #10 on: July 19, 2019, 06:17:36 PM »
Should you have an interest in reproducing an Eister, Jim Kibler has excellent casting of Butt Plate, Trigger Guard and Ramrod pipes.   Eister's rifles have a number of unique features and provide plenty of decorative explorations.

Offline J. Talbert

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2019, 09:16:07 PM »
Eister had several unique features that he used repeatedly.  A number of his elements are seen in the work of other smiths who were obviously somehow connected with him, but despite that his work is instantly recognizable.
From his unique patch box design with liberal use of screws, to his sideplate, his slightly different take on the traditional entry thimble, to his fanciful, carefree carving and engraving, all of which captured my attention years ago.

If I could own a single original golden age rifle of my choosing, it would certainly be one of his.

Jeff
"When the people find that they can vote themselves money, that will herald the end of the republic"  Benjamin Franklin

Offline Ezra

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2019, 11:19:04 PM »
Should you have an interest in reproducing an Eister, Jim Kibler has excellent casting of Butt Plate, Trigger Guard and Ramrod pipes.   Eister's rifles have a number of unique features and provide plenty of decorative explorations.


Thanks for the tip Ron, the Eister inspired castings from Jim Kibler just arrived in the mail.  ;D
And thanks to everyone else for all the guidance, links and photos.  You guys are alright.

I neglected to say that dealing with Kibler Longrifles was easy peasy.  Katherine was a pleasure to speak with and the castings are very nice.

Ez


« Last Edit: July 22, 2019, 01:12:27 AM by Ezra »
"Rules are for the obedience of fools and guidance of wise men"

Offline Brent English

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #13 on: July 22, 2019, 05:25:08 PM »
I have an Eister copy that Ron Scott made using Mr. Kibler's castings.  A few photos are attached.   Ron, if you have more, please feel free to post. 






Done right is better than done fast.

Offline D. Taylor Sapergia

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #14 on: July 22, 2019, 07:13:55 PM »
Pretty rifle Brent!  Any more photos?
D. Taylor Sapergia
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Art is not an object.  It is the excitement inspired by the object.

Offline Shreckmeister

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #15 on: July 22, 2019, 11:51:43 PM »
I’d sure like to see the cheek side of that
Rightful liberty is unobstructed action according to our will within limits drawn around us by the equal rights of others. I do not add 'within the limits of the law' because law is often but the tyrant's will, and always so when it violates the rights of the individual.

Offline Brent English

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #16 on: July 23, 2019, 04:27:31 AM »
I’ll try to get a few more tomorrow night.
Done right is better than done fast.

Offline D. Taylor Sapergia

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #17 on: July 23, 2019, 07:02:19 PM »
Looking at the image above, of the off side of the rifle, it occurred to me that to a novice builder's eye, there is a cove cut all the way around the lock, and that may be why we sometimes see that treatment on rifles posted here for critique.

This is of course, not the case at all.  As an explanation, what you are seeing is a relief carved panel, likely less than 1/32" deep/high, outlining the lock panel. The width of the panel varies - there are hardly two places where it is the same width, and that adds much interest to the rifle.

I hope that makes sense...
D. Taylor Sapergia
www.sapergia.blogspot.com

Art is not an object.  It is the excitement inspired by the object.

Offline Ezra

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #18 on: July 23, 2019, 07:52:39 PM »
it occurred to me that to a novice builder's eye, there is a cove cut all the way around the lock...

Taylor,

It must be me, but you lost me with the term “cove”.  Can you explain at the 3rd grade level? :D


Ez
"Rules are for the obedience of fools and guidance of wise men"

Offline D. Taylor Sapergia

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #19 on: July 23, 2019, 11:20:27 PM »
I'm referring to the sometimes hollowed wood from the lock panel to the tang, and from the lock panel to the trigger guard/plate.  Often that plane is flat, but sometimes it is hollowed out or 'cove' in shape, as opposed to 'bead'.  The first is CONCAVE, while the second is CONVEX.  I think those later two words would have been more descriptive than my first effort.  I used the word 'cove' because I have seen the lock panels defined by the use of a rat tailed file, which cuts a serious 'cove' around the panel, and by my measure, is incorrect.
D. Taylor Sapergia
www.sapergia.blogspot.com

Art is not an object.  It is the excitement inspired by the object.

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2019, 03:57:32 PM »
A few more photos:











Offline J. Talbert

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Re: George Eister
« Reply #21 on: July 27, 2019, 08:53:42 PM »
Great work Ron.

Very nice rifle,

Jeff
"When the people find that they can vote themselves money, that will herald the end of the republic"  Benjamin Franklin